WELCOME TO 
DREW CENTRAL MIDDLE SCHOOL 
2016-2017 
Parent-Student Handbook 
 Fifth, Sixth, Seventh & Eighth Grades 
 
 
 The policies and procedures in this handbook are the result of extensive collaboration 
between administration, faculty, staff, parents, community members, school board, the Arkansas 
Department of Education, and the Arkansas Legislature. This information has been carefully 
organized and presented in an effort to help you as parents to understand the policies of Drew 
Central Middle School. You are an important part of our school and we want you to feel 
welcome as an equal partner in your child’s education. As your child enters our doors each day, 
we will strive to provide the very best educational opportunities possible. 
It is my hope that these policies will guide and direct you in helping your child have a 
successful year at school. I would encourage you to read, explain, and discuss these policies 
with your children so that they have a clear understanding of the expectations of our school. 
Becoming familiar with the policies of Drew Central Middle School will assist you in making 
decisions that will affect your child’s education. It is very important that teachers, parents, and 
administrators communicate openly and frequently in order to monitor the progress of your 
children. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me or your child’s 
teacher at 870-367-5235. 
 
Sincerely, 
 
Patti A. Smith 
 
Patti A. Smith, Principal 
Drew Central Middle School 
 

Board of Education 
 
Rene’ Knowles, President 
renesc13@yahoo.com 
 
Jason Cater, Vice-President 
jcaterdvm@yahoo.com 
 
Laura Whitaker, Secretary 
lauraowhitaker@gmail.com 
 
 Curley Jackson, Member 
 curley.jackson@yahoo.com 
 
Mike Pennington, Member 
mpennington@ccc-cable.net 
 
 
 
Administration 
 
Billy Williams, Superintendent of Schools - 367-5369 
billy.williams@drewcentral.org 
 
Kimbraly Barnes, Director of Instruction – 367-5369 
kimbraly.barnes@drewcentral.org 
 
Patti Smith, Principal – 367-5235 
patti.smith@drewcentral.org 
 
Michael Goad, Dean of Students – 367-5235 
michael.goad@drewcentral.org 
 
 http://www.drewcentral.org 
 
 
 
Telephone Numbers/Fax: 
(Area Code 870) 
 
 Elementary School Principal - 367-6893/fax 460-5500 Elementary Counselor - 367-8285 
 Middle School Principal - 367-5235/fax 460-5502 Middle School Counselor - 367-5235 
 Gym & Cafeteria - 367-6011 Vocational Building - 367-8411 
 High School Principal - 367-6076/fax 460-5501 High School Counselor - 367-5511 
 Superintendent - 367-5369/fax 367-1932 Bus Shop - 367-3266 

Drew Central Middle School Faculty & Staff 
Name 
Position 
Email 
Atkins, Latanza 
7-12 Gr Literacy Facilitator 
Latanza.atkins@drewcentral.org 
Bayless, Chris 
5-12 Gr Band 
Chris.bayless@drewcentral.org 
Borse, Sheila 
8th Gr English/ESL 
Sheila.borse@drewcentral.org 
Briggs, Stephanie 
School Nurse 
Stephanie.briggs@drewcentral.org 
Cater, Meranda 
5th Gr Science/Social Studies 
Meranda.cater@drewcentral.org 
Campagna, Dawn 
LEA Supervisor/Sp Ed Coordinator 
Dawn.campagna@drewcentral.org 
Cox, Rob 
Football Coach/ MS History 
Rob.Cox@drewcentral.org 
Deen, Violet 
7th Gr Info & Communication Technology 
Violet.deen@drewcentral.org 
Eubanks, Janine 
7-8th Gr Choir & 5-6th Gr Input Technology 
Janine.eubanks@drewcentral.org 
Eubanks, Stephanie 
Alg I & GT Coordinator 
Stephanie.eubanks@drewcentral.org 
Flemister, Hannah 
Speech & Language Pathologist 
Hannah.flemister@drewcentral.org 
Forrest, Jessica 
8th Gr Science 
Jessica.forrest@drewcentral.org 
Gardner, Sheila 
Media Specialist & Tools for Learning 
Sheila.gardner@drewcentral.org 
Goad, Michael 
Girls Basketball Coach & Dean of Students 
Michael.goad@drewcentral.org 
Goodding, Alan 
8th Gr Math & Alg I 
Alan.goodding@drewcentral.org 
Graham, Joy 
Special Programs/Testing Coord./504 Prog 
Joy.graham@drewcentral.org 
Greenwood, Becca 
7th & 8th Gr Sp Ed Intervention 
Becca.greenwood@drewcentral.org 
Griffin, Kami 
School Nurse 
Kami.griffin@drewcentral.org 
Lindsay Harper 
5th, 6th & 8th Gr Art 
Lindsay.harper@drewcentral.org 
Hewitt, Sarah 
5th Gr Math 
Sarah.hewitt@drewcentral.org 
Hobbs, Mary 
K-6 Literacy Facilitator 
Mary.hobbs@drewcentral.org 
Hood, Amanda 
Admin. Assistant 
Amanda.hood@drewcentral.org 
Horn, Connie 
In School Suspension Parapro 
Connie.horn@drewcentral.org 
Jones, Anna 
Parent Center Coordinator 
Anna.jones@drewcentral.org 
Jones, Kohl 
Counselor 
Kohl.jones@drewcentral.org 
King, Belinda 
6TH Gr Literacy 
Belinda.king@drewcentral.org 
Leek, Brittany 
Agriculture 
Brittany.leek@drewcentral.org 
Lloyd, Michell 
7th & 8th Gr Parapro 
Michell.lloyd@drewcentral.org 
Luper, Cindy 
Math Facilitator 
Cindy.luper@drewcentral.org 
Meier, Katie 
7th Gr Art 
Katie.meier@drewcentral.org 
McKay, Jessica 
5th – 7th Gr Sp Ed Intervention 
Jessica.mckay@drewcentral.org 
McMahon, Randi 
5th & 6th Gr Physical Education 
Randi.mcmahon@drewcentral.org 
Moore, Steve 
Football Coach 
Steve.moore@drewcentral.org 
Nolen, Bonita 
Sp Ed Parapro 
Bonita.harden@drewcentral.org 
Norris, Jo Ann 
5th & 6th Gr Parapro 
joann.norris@drewcentral.org 
Outlaw, Amy 
7th Gr English, Debate & Jr Cheer Sponsor 
Amy.outlaw@drewcentral.org 
Pace, Becky 
Library Parapro 
Becky.pace@drewcentral.org 
Piper, Karen 
7th Gr Science 
Karen.piper@drewcentral.org 
Sanderlin, Rhonda 
8th Gr Social Studies 
Rhonda.sanderlin@drewcentral.org 
Smith, Amanda 
6th Gr Math 
Amanda.smith@drewcentral.org 
Smith, Pam 
K-6 Music Teacher 
Pam.smith@drewcentral.org 
Smith, Patti 
Principal 
Patti.smith@drewcentral.org 
Tucker, Kelsey 
7th Gr Teacher, EAST & Robotics 
Kelsey.tucker@drewcentral.org 
Vance, Penny 
Career Development 
Penny.vance@drewcentral.org 
Watson, CJ 
Boys Basketball Coach 
Charles.watson@drewcentral.org 
Watson, Sara 
5th Gr Literacy 
Sara.watson@drewcentral.org 
Werb, Andy 
7th Gr Social Studies 
Andy.werb@drewcentral.org 
Wilmoth, Leigh Anne 
6th Gr Science/Social Studies 
Leighanne.wilmoth@drewcentral.org 

 
 

 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
ABSENCES…………………………………………………………………………….…… .. .20 
ACADEMIC RECOGNITON…………………………………………………………… ... ...99 
ACCIDENT INSURANCE FOR STUDENTS…………………………………………..… .. 10 
ACT ASPIRE EXAM………………………………………………………………………….95 
ALE-ALTERNATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT……………………………………. 40 
ALMA MATER……………………………………………………………………………… .. .9 
ADMINISTRATION OF MEDICINE………………………………………………………. 64 
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CLASSES……………………………………………… .... ….76 
ARSON…………………………………………………………………………………….…... 41 
ATTENDANCE AWARDS…………………………………………………………………... 99 
BEHAVIOR NOT COVERED……………………………………………………………… .42 
BELL SCHEDULE (7TH/8TH)……………………………………………………..……………………….………… .. .23 
BOARD OF EDUCATION MEMBERS……………………………………………… ...... ….2 
BULLYING……………………………………………………………………………....... . ....66 
BUS DISCIPLINE……………………………………………………………………… ...... ...44 
CAFETERIA POLICY…………………………………………………………………… .. ...82 
CELL PHONES…………………………………………………………………………… .. ...76 
CHRONIC DISCIPLINE POLICY……………………………………………………… .. ...40 
CLOSED CAMPUS………………………………………………………………………........24 
CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT……………………………………………………… .. …38 
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND PARASITES………………………………......... .....56 
COMPULSORY ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS……………………………..... ... ......15 
CONTACT WITH STUDENTS WHILE AT SCHOOL…………………………… .. …….29 
CORPORAL PUNISHMENT…………………………………………………….......... .........60 
COUNSELING/SCHOOL BASED MEMTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS………..... . ..........94 
CURRICULUM……………………………………………………………………… .. …….100 
DEFINITIONS ABOUT DISCIPLINE……………………………………………..... ...........34 
DETENTION…………………………………………………………………………... ...........40 
DISCIPLINE FOR THE DISABLED…………………………………………… .. …………79 
DISCIPLINE POLICY STATEMENT……………………………………………... …….…44 
DISRUPTION OF SCHOOL…………………………………………………… .. ………..…44 
DREW CENTRAL MISSION AND MOTTO………………………………… .. …………....8 
DREW CENTRAL/MONTICELLO FREEDOM OF CHOICE…………… .. …................19 
DREW CENTRAL DISTRICT PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT PLAN…… .. …………..107 
DRUGS AND ALCOHOL…………………………………………………… .. ……………..47 
DUE PROCESS……………………………………………………………… ... .......................79 
EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY………………………………………… .. ……………......11 
ELIGIBILITY FOR 504……………………………………………………... …….................80 
EMAIL ADDRESSES FOR ADMINISTRATORS……………………… .. ……….......…….2 
EMERGENCY DRILLS…………………………………………………… .. …….................59 
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS………………………………………… .. ……………..….12 
EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY…………………………… .. ……………...….25 
EQUITY POLICY………………………………………………………… .. ……….................7 
EXPULSION……………………………………………………………… .. …........................54 
EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES………………………………… .. ………..................86 

FACULTY & STAFF INFORMATION……………………………… .. ………………….....3 
FIGHT SONG…………………………………………………………… .. ………………...….9 
FIGHTING……………………………………………………………… .. ………………...…45 
FIREWORKS…………………………………………………………… .. ……………...……41 
FOSTER STUDENTS………………………………………………… .. ………………….…82 
FOOD SHARING IN THE CAFETERIA…………………………… .. …………………….91 
GAMBLING…………………………………………………………… .. …………………….41 
GANGS AND GANG ACTIVITY…………………………………… .. ………………..……49 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FOOD AND BEVERAGES... ……………………....80 
GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION……………………… .. ………………………..97 
GRADING POLICY………………………………………...…… ... ………………………....99 
HISTORY OF DREW CENTRAL………………………………... ……………….………...11 
HOME ACCESS CENTER-HAC……………………………… .. …………………………..98 
HOMELESS STUDENTS……………………………………… .. …………………..……….61 
HOME SCHOOLED STUDENTS INTENT TO PARCIPATE IN ACTIVITIES … .. …...88 
HOME SCHOOLING……………………………….………………………………… .. ……20 
HOMEWORK POLICY……………………………………………………………… .. …….97 
IDENTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS…………………………………………… ... ……..37 
IMMORALITY……………………………………………………………………… .. ……....37 
IMMUNIZATIONS………………………………………………………………… .. ……65,89 
IN-SCHOOL SUSPENSIONS…...………………………………………………… .. ……….54 
INTERNET SAFETY/ELECTRONIC DEVICE USE…………………………… .. ………51 
INSULT OR ABUSE OF A TEACHER…………………………………………… ………..43 
LASER POINTERS……………………………………………………………… .. ……….....51 
LETTER FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT………………………………… .. …………….7 
LOCKERS……………………………………………………………………… .. …………..100 
LOST BOOKS………………………………………………………………… .. ……………100 
MAKE-UP WORK…………………………………………………………… .. ……..………22 
MASCOT……………………………………………………………………… .. ……………....8 
MISSION & MOTTO…………………………………………………………... ……………...8 
MONEY BROUGHT TO SCHOOL/STUDENT PROPERTY…………… .. …………….100 
OFF CAMPUS EVENTS…………………………………………………… .. ……………....38 
OFFICE REFERRALS……………………………………………………… .. ………..…….39 
PARENT CENTER………………………………………………………… .. ………….…..100 
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT PLAN…………………………………… .. ………….…...101 
PARENT TEACHER ORGANIZATION/PTO………………………… .. ………………..100 
PERMANENT RECORDS……………………………………………… .. ……………..…...60 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION……………………………………………… .. ………….……..103 
PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS AND SCREENINGS………………… .. …….………...63,66 
PLACEMENT OF MULTIPLE BIRTH SIBLINGS………………… .. ………………..… 83 
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE………………………………………… .. ……………...……. 76 
PRIVACY OF STUDENTS’ RECORDS……………………………... …………..…………26 
PROHIBITED CONDUCT………………………………………… .. ……………………….33 
PTO: PARENT TEACHER ORGANIZATION…………………... ………………………101 
PUBLIC DISPLAYS OF AFFECTION…………………………... …………………………41 
RACIAL OR ETHNIC SLURS………………………………… .. …………………….…….42 
REASONABLE FORCE………………………………………… .. …………………….……38 
RELEASE OF PUPILS………………………………………… .. …………………………...24 
REPORTING PROGRESS TO PARENTS…………………… .. ……………………….….98 
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS……………………………… .. …………………………..12 

REPONSIBILTY OF SUPERINTENDENT, PRINCIPAL & TEACHERS .. …………….32 
RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS & PARENTS………………………… .. …………….33 
SCHOOL CALENDAR……………………………………………………… .. BACK COVER 
SCHOOL CHOICE………………………………………………………… .. ……………….16 
SCHOOL COLORS…………………………………………………………... ………………..8 
SCHOOL LUNCH SUBSTITUTIONS…………………………………… .. ………………..80 
SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT………………………………………… .. …………….…104 
SCHOOL TELEPHONE………………………………………………… .. ………………..103 
SEARCH, SEIZURE, AND INTERROGATIONS…………………… .. …………………..55 
SELECTION/INSPECTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS .. ……………..……..94 
SELLING PERSONAL ITEMS AT SCHOOL……...……………… .. …………………….38 
SMART CORE CURRICULUM (2017)………..…………………… .. ………...…………...69 
SMART CORE CURRICULUM (2018 and thereafter)…………… .. …………...………...72 
SPECIAL EDUCATION…………………………………………… .. ………...……………..78 
STUDENT ACCELERATION…………………………………… .. ………...………………84 
STUDENT ASSAULT OR BATTERY………………………… .. ………………...………...45 
STUDENT DISCIPLINE……………………………………… .. …………………………....31 
STUDENT DRESS AND GROOMING………………………... ……………..……………..47 
STUDENT HANDBOOK……………………………………… .. …………………...……….66 
STUDENT MEDICATIONS………………………………… .. …………………..…………57 
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS/EQUAL ACCESS………… .. ……………………...……..25 
STUDENT PROMOTION/RETENTION…………………… .. ………………………...…..84 
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF LITERATURE.. …….28,37 
STUDENT SEXUAL HARASSMENT…………………………………………… .. ……......50 
STUDENTS SICK DURING RECESS…………………………………………… .. …...…...38 
STUDENT TRANSFERS………………………………………………………… ...... ………15 
STUDENT VISITORS………………………………………………………………... ……....30 
SUSPENSION FROM SCHOOL…………………………………………………… .. ..…….53 
TARDIES……………………………………………………………………..……… .. ………23 
TEACHER REMOVAL OF STUDENTS FROM CLASS……………………… .. ………..94 
TERRORISTIC THREATENING……………………………………………… .. …..……..42 
THEFT…………………………………………………………………………… .. ……..……42 
TITLE ONE SCHOOL WIDE………………………………………………… .. …...……..104 
TOBACCO AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS………………………………… .. …….………47 
TRANSPORTATION ELIGIBILITY/RULES..…………………………… .. …..………….43 
TRUANCY…………………………………………………………………….. ……………....42 
VALENTINE’S DAY HOLIDAY………………………………………… .. …………….….38 
VIDEO SURVEILLANCE AND OTHER STUDENT MONITORING .. …………….…...78 
VISITORS TO THE SCHOOL………………………………………… .. ………………......93 
WEAPONS AND DANGEROUS INSTRUMENTS………………… .. ………….…………46 
WELCOME BY PATTI SMITH…………………………………… .. ………………..………1 
WELLNESS POLICY……………………………………………… .................. ………….…91 
WINTER/SUMMER PLAYGROUND POLICY……………………………………… .. ...104 
WITHDRAWAL OF STUDENTS……………………………………………………….….104 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Drew Central Schools 
250 University Drive 
(870) 367-5369 
Fax (870) 367-1932 
 
C:\Documents and Settings\tjackson\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\U6WR7DSQ\MC900330433[1].wmf
C:\Documents and Settings\tjackson\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\U6WR7DSQ\MC900330433[1].wmf 
 
 
To: All Parents/Guardians 
 
From: Billy Williams, Superintendent of Schools 
 
Ref: Signature on student documents 
 
State Law (80-1629.6-80-1629.8) requires documentation of student and parent receipt of student 
discipline policies. The student handbook contains pertinent information from Drew Central 
Middle School and both you and your child should read the handbook and keep it handy for 
future reference. 
 
In order for us to be sure that you received your copy, it is essential that we have your signature 
to that effect on file in the middle school office. Please sign and return all signature and 
appendix pages that apply to your child(ren). These pages will be inserted into the back of the 
student handbook. 
 
Because of past problems in getting these returned in a timely manner, the district has established 
the following policy. Any student who does not return these signed pages within thirty (30) days 
after school starts, will be placed on a call list in order to provide assistance to parents in 
completing the signature forms. 
 
Thank you for your cooperation in this matter. 
 
****************************************************************************** 
 
EQUITY POLICY 
 
It is the policy of the Drew Central School District to provide equal opportunities without regard 
to race, color, national origin, sex, age, qualifying disability or veteran status in its educational 
programs and activities in accordance with state and federal laws. This includes, but is not 
limited to, admissions, educational services, financial services, financial aid and/or employment. 
Inquiries concerning this policy should be directed to: 
 
 Kim Greer, Equity Coordinator 
 250 University Drive 
 Monticello, Arkansas 71655 
 (870) 367-6076 Ext. 106 
 

MISSION: 
Drew Central Middle School believes all 
students can learn. 
Our school is committed to preparing 
students to become responsible, productive 
citizens. 
 
 
 
 
MOTTO: 
 “Academic Achievement and Well-Being” 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 DISTRICT COLORS AND MASCOT 
 
Pirate Head1
The school colors shall be red and white and the Pirate shall be the 
mascot. 

 
 
 
DREW CENTRAL ALMA MATER 
Sing we the praises of old Drew Central 
Thank thee for worthy goals; 
Gladly we cheer thee with voices ringing, 
School with comrades old. 
Fill every heart with the loyal spirit 
Be ever brave and true; 
Filled with the love of Drew Central High School 
We'll stand up for you. 
 
Alma Mater, on with thee, 
Face defeat or victory. 
We'll sing your praise 
Where'er we be, 
Drew Central High School on with thee! 
 
 
 
 

 
 DREW CENTRAL FIGHT SONG 
 Oh when the DCH team falls in line 
 We’re gonna win this game another time 
 and for the DCH team we love so well 
 we're gonna yell and yell and yell and 
yell and yell 
 We're gonna fight, fight, fight for every score 
 We're gonna circle in and score some more 
We're gonna boost those Pirates 
 to the sky, 
through the sky, 
 fight, fight, fight! 
 
 
 
 
 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE MESSAGE 
 
TO: Parents and Guardians of Drew Central School District 
FROM: Billy Williams, Superintendent 
DATE: August 1, 2016 
SUBJECT: Accident Insurance for Students 
1. The following facts should be fully understood by the parents and guardians of all Drew Central School 
District athletes and students who participate in school sponsored activities in grades PK-12. Drew Central 
School District has entered into a contractual agreement with United HealthCare Student Resources for 
athletic and extracurricular insurance underwritten by United HealthCare Insurance Company for all 
students in grades PK-12. This coverage is for AAA sponsored activities, including all AAA athletic 
events. Your child will be covered while participating in, practicing for, and traveling to and from such an 
activity in a school furnished vehicle. 
2. Drew Central School District assumes no responsibility as a result of injuries that occur at school or during 
a school sponsored event including athletic events, however this insurance is provided at school expense. 
This is a SECONDARY INSURANCE to whatever health insurance the parent or guardian has for their 
children and all claims should be filed with the primary health insurance company and with United 
HealthCare. You will need to indicate on the claim form the name and address of your regular insurance 
carrier. 
3. If the student has no other insurance coverage, United HealthCare will become the primary carrier and will 
pay accordingly. The parent or guardian should indicate on the claim form if they have no other health 
insurance. 
4. All policies have limitations. United HealthCare will pay up to the amounts that are listed on the student 
brochure. The brochure will be sent out in the Parent Kits. Parents will be responsible for any amounts 
remaining after both the primary health insurance and United HealthCare limitations have been reached. 
5. The Drew Central School District and its employees are NOT responsible for any costs for treatment to 
your child by any doctor. 
6. In case of an injury, it is the responsibility of the parent to file a claim form. These forms are available in 
the Superintendent’s office. They can also be printed from United HealthCare Student Resources’ website 
at www.k12studentinsurance.com. The coaches, sponsors, and administrative personnel will be happy to 
assist you in completing the form; however no Drew Central School District employee is responsible for 
filing your claim. 
7. As with any policy, there are policy exclusions. Please review the Policy Limitations that are listed in the 
brochure. 
8. Treatment must begin within 30 days from the injury and claims must be filed within 90 days of the 
injury. Benefits will be paid for covered expenses incurred within 52 weeks from the date of the accident. 
9. The At School Coverage is provided for your child by the district at no cost to the parent or guardian. It 
provides coverage for injuries that occur at school or during school-sponsored activities during the regular 
school year. You are eligible to purchase the 24 hour coverage if you wish from the Student Brochure. 
Please understand that the coverage provided by the Drew Central School District has certain limitations and is 
considered primary coverage only if you have no other coverage for your child(ren). The Drew Central School District 
is NOT responsible for payment of any medical expenses not paid by United HealthCare. If you have any questions 
please feel free to call at 367-5369. 
 
 

 
GENERAL HISTORY OF DREW CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
DISTRICT 
 
 
The Drew Central School District, established in 1927 by the Drew County School Board, was named A 
& M Training School #5 because of its affiliation with Arkansas A & M College in Monticello. The 
purpose of establishing the school was to provide training for teachers. The name of the school was 
changed to Drew Central School District #5 in 1934 and remained a part of the college until 1936. 
 
At that time, the college and the school had grown to the point that the two needed to be separate entities. 
Other factors, such as a fire that destroyed the school buildings, created a necessity for separate 
institutions. 
 
The college leased 20 acres of land to Drew Central for 99 years for the site of the current campus of 
Drew Central. An additional eleven acres was leased in 1983, making a total of 31 acres at the present 
time. 
 
The Drew Central School District contains 570 square miles. The entire district is in rural Drew County 
with all students being bused from this area to the campus in grades Pre-Kindergarten – 12. Several 
consolidated/annexed districts have been incorporated into Drew Central over the years to make it what it 
is today. In the early 1900’s, Drew County had over 80 small schools; today there are only two school 
districts within the county boundaries, Monticello School District and Drew Central School District. In 
1990, Wilmar was the last school to be annexed with Drew Central and the high school students were 
transported to the Drew Central Campus. In 1992, the Wilmar Elementary School campus was closed and 
all students from the former Wilmar School were housed on the Drew Central Campus. 
 
 
 
EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY 
 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School District assumes the responsibility of providing students attending its schools a 
high quality education that challenges each student to achieve to their maximum potential. The District 
shall endeavor to create the environment within the schools that is necessary to attain this goal. The 
creation of a positive learning climate shall be based on the following core beliefs:* 
 
1. All students can be successful learners. 
2. Students learn at different rates and in different ways. 
3. A primary goal shall be to give students the skills they need to be life-long learners. 
4. The education of all citizens is basic to our community’s well-being. 
5. Student achievement is affected positively by the involvement of parents and the community in 
the schools. 
6. The District is responsible for helping cultivate good citizenship skills in its students. 
7. Students reflect the moral and ethical values of their environment. 
8. All people have a right to a safe environment. 
9. Each person is responsible for his/her own actions. 
10. Innovation involves taking risks. 
11. Schools are responsible for creating the conditions that promote success. 
12. Each person is entitled to retain his/her dignity. 
13. All people have the right to be treated with respect and the responsibility to treat others 
respectfully. 
14. For teachers to succeed in cultivating high student achievement, they need to be provided with the 
materials, training, and environment necessary to produce such results. 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 
Last Revised: 06/30/2013 
 
 

 
4.1—RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 
 
 
 
 
Definitions: 
 
“Reside” means to be physically present and to maintain a permanent place of abode for an average of no 
fewer than four (4) calendar days and nights per week for a primary purpose other than school attendance. 
 
“Resident” means a student whose parents, legal guardians, persons having legal, lawful control of the 
student under order of a court, or persons standing in loco parentis reside in the school district. 
 
“Residential address” means the physical location where the student’s parents, legal guardians, persons 
having legal, lawful control of the student under order of a court, or persons standing in loco parentis 
reside. A student may use the residential address of a legal guardian, person having legal, lawful control 
of the student under order of a court, or person standing in loco parentis only if the student resides at the 
same residential address and if the guardianship or other legal authority is not granted solely for 
educational needs or school attendance purposes. 
 
The schools of the District shall be open and free through the completion of the secondary program to all 
persons between the ages of five (5) and twenty one (21) years whose parents, legal guardians, or other 
persons having lawful control of the person under an order of a court reside within the District1 and to all 
persons between those ages who have been legally transferred to the District for educational purposes. 
 
Any person eighteen (18) years of age or older may establish a residence separate and apart from his or 
her parents or guardians for school attendance purposes. 
 
In order for a person under the age of eighteen (18) years to establish a residence for the purpose of 
attending the District’s schools separate and apart from his or her parents, guardians, or other persons 
having lawful control of him or her under an order of a court, the person must actually reside in the 
District for a primary purpose other than that of school attendance. However, a student previously 
enrolled in the district who is placed under the legal guardianship of a noncustodial parent living outside 
the district by a custodial parent on active military duty may continue to attend district schools. A foster 
child who was previously enrolled in a District school and who has had a change in placement to a 
residence outside the District, may continue to remain enrolled in his/her current school unless the 
presiding court rules otherwise. 
 
Under instances prescribed in A.C.A. § 6-18-203, a child or ward of an employee of the district or of the 
education coop to which the district belongs may enroll in the district even though the employee and 
his/her child or ward reside outside the district. 
Cross References: Policy 4.40—HOMELESS STUDENTS 
 Policy 4.52—STUDENTS WHO ARE FOSTER CHILDREN 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
A.C.A. § 6-18-202 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-203 
 A.C.A. § 9-28-113 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/30/2013 
 
 
4.2—ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 
 
 
 
To enroll in a school in the District, the child must be a resident of the District as defined in District 
policy (4.1—RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS), meet the criteria outlined in policy 4.40—HOMELESS 
STUDENTS or in policy 4.52—STUDENTS WHO ARE FOSTER CHILDREN, be accepted as a transfer 

student under the provisions of policy 4.4, or participate under a school choice option and submit the 
required paperwork as required by the choice option. 
 
Students may enter kindergarten if they will attain the age of five (5) on or before August 1 of the year in 
which they are seeking initial enrollment. Any student who has been enrolled in a state-accredited or 
state-approved kindergarten program in another state for at least sixty (60) days, who will become five (5) 
years old during the year in which he/she is enrolled in kindergarten, and who meets the basic residency 
requirement for school attendance may be enrolled in kindergarten upon written request to the District. 
 
Any child who will be six (6) years of age on or before October 1 of the school year of enrollment and 
who has not completed a state-accredited kindergarten program shall be evaluated by the district and may 
be placed in the first grade if the results of the evaluation justify placement in the first grade and the 
child’s parent or legal guardian agrees with placement in the first grade; otherwise the child shall be 
placed in kindergarten. 
 
Any child may enter first grade in a District school if the child will attain the age of six (6) years during 
the school year in which the child is seeking enrollment and the child has successfully completed a 
kindergarten program in a public school in Arkansas. 
 
Any child who has been enrolled in the first grade in a state-accredited or state-approved elementary 
school in another state for a period of at least sixty (60) days, who will become age six (6) years during 
the school year in which he/she is enrolled in grade one (1), and who meets the basic residency 
requirements for school attendance may be enrolled in the first grade. 
 
Students who move into the District from an accredited school shall be assigned to the same grade as they 
were attending in their previous school (mid-year transfers) or as they would have been assigned in their 
previous school. Home-schooled and private school students shall be evaluated by the District to 
determine their appropriate grade placement. 
 
The district shall make no attempt to ascertain the immigration status, legal or illegal, of any student or 
his/her parent or legal guardian presenting for enrollment.1 
 
Prior to the child’s admission to a District school: 
1. The parent, guardian, or other responsible person shall furnish the child’s social security number, or if 
they request, the district will assign the child a nine (9) digit number designated by the department of 
education. 
 
2. The parent, guardian, or other responsible person shall provide the district with one (1) of the 
following documents indicating the child’s age: 
a. A birth certificate; 
b. A statement by the local registrar or a county recorder certifying the child’s date of birth; 
c. An attested baptismal certificate; 
d. A passport; 
e. An affidavit of the date and place of birth by the child’s parent or guardian; 
f. United States military identification; or 
g. Previous school records. 
 
3. The parent, guardian, or other responsible person shall indicate on school registration forms whether 
the child has been expelled from school in any other school district or is a party to an expulsion 
proceeding. The Board of Education reserves the right, after a hearing before the Board, not to allow 
any person who has been expelled from another school district to enroll as a student until the time of 
the person's expulsion has expired. 
 
4. In accordance with Policy 4.57—IMMUNIZATIONS, the child shall be age appropriately immunized 
or have an exemption issued by the Arkansas Department of Health. 

Uniformed Services Member's Children 
 
For the purposes of this policy: 
1. Active duty members of the uniformed services includes members of the National Guard and 
Reserve on active duty orders pursuant to 10 U.S.C. Section 1209 and 1211; 
2. Uniformed services means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard as well as the 
Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Public 
Health Services; 
3. Veteran means: a person who served in the uniformed services and who was discharged or 
released there from under conditions other than dishonorable. 
 
 Eligible child means the children of: 
1. Active duty members of the uniformed services; 
2. Members or veterans of the uniformed services who are severely injured and medically 
discharged or retired for a period of one (1) year after medical discharge or retirement; and 
3. Members of the uniformed services who die on active duty or as a result of injuries sustained on 
active duty for a period of one (1) year after death. 
 
An eligible child as defined in this policy shall: 
1. Be allowed to continue his/her enrollment at the grade level commensurate with his/her grade level 
he/she was in at the time of transition from his/her previous school, regardless of age; 
2. Be eligible for enrollment in the next highest grade level, regardless of age if the student has 
satisfactorily completed the prerequisite grade level in his/her previous school; 
3. Enter the District's school on the validated level from his/her previous accredited school when 
transferring into the District after the start of the school year; 
4. Be enrolled in courses and programs the same as or similar to the ones the student was enrolled in 
his/her previous school to the extent that space is available. This does not prohibit the District from 
performing subsequent evaluations to ensure appropriate placement and continued enrollment of the 
student in the courses/and/or programs; 
5. Be provided services comparable to those the student with disabilities received in his/her previous 
school based on his/her previous Individualized Education Program (IEP). This does not preclude the 
District school from performing subsequent evaluations to ensure appropriate placement of the 
student; 
6. Make reasonable accommodations and modifications to address the needs of an incoming student 
with disabilities, subject to an existing 504 or Title II Plan, necessary to provide the student with 
equal access to education. This does not preclude the District school from performing subsequent 
evaluations to ensure appropriate placement of the student; 
7. Be enrolled by an individual who has been given the special power of attorney for the student's 
guardianship. The individual shall have the power to take all other actions requiring parental 
participation and/or consent; 
8. Be eligible to continue attending District schools if he/she has been placed under the legal 
guardianship of a noncustodial parent living outside the district by a custodial parent on active 
military duty. 
Cross References: 4.1—RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 
4.4—STUDENT TRANSFERS 
 4.5—SCHOOL CHOICE 
 4.34—COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND PARASITES 
4.40—HOMELESS STUDENTS 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
A.C.A. § 6-18-201 (c) 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-207 
A.C.A. § 6-18-208 
A.C.A. § 6-18-510 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-702 
 A.C.A. § 6-15-504 (f) 
A.C.A. § 9-28-113 
Plyler v Doe 457 US 202,221 (1982) 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: June 2016 

 
 
4.3 – COMPULSORY ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 
 
 
 
Every parent, guardian, or other person having custody or charge of any child age five (5) through seventeen (17) 
years on or before August 1 of that year who resides, as defined by policy (4.1 -- RESIDENCE 
REQUIREMENTS), within the District shall enroll and send the child to a District school with the following 
exceptions. 
 
1. The child is enrolled in private or parochial school. 
2. The child is being home-schooled and the conditions of policy (4.6 -- HOME SCHOOLING) have been 
met. 
3. The child will not be age six (6) on or before August 1 of that particular school year and the parent, 
guardian, or other person having custody or charge of the child elects not to have him/her attend 
kindergarten. A kindergarten wavier form prescribed by regulation of the Department of Education must be 
signed and on file with the District administrative office. 
4. The child has received a high school diploma or its equivalent as determined by the State Board of 
Education. 
 
5. The child is age sixteen (16) or above and is enrolled in a post-secondary vocational-technical institution, a 
community college, or a two-year or four-year institution of higher education. 
6. The child is age sixteen (16) or seventeen (17) and has met the requirements to enroll in an adult education 
program as defined by A.C.A. § 6-18-201 (b). 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-201 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-207 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 06/30/2011 
 
 
4.4 – STUDENT TRANSFERS 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School District shall review and accept or reject requests for transfers, both into and 
out of the district, on a case by case basis at the July and December regularly scheduled board meetings. 
 
The District may reject a nonresident’s application for admission if its acceptance would necessitate the 
addition of staff or classrooms, exceed the capacity of a program, class, grade level, or school building, or 
cause the District to provide educational services not currently provided in the affected school. The 
District shall reject applications that would cause it to be out of compliance with applicable laws and 
regulations regarding desegregation. 
 
Any student transferring from a school accredited by the Department of Education to a school in this 
district shall be placed into the same grade the student would have been in had the student remained at the 
former school. Any grades, course credits, and/or promotions received by a student while enrolled in the 
Division of Youth Services system of education shall be considered transferable in the same manner as 
those grades, course credits, and promotions from other accredited Arkansas public educational entities. 
 
Any student transferring from home school or a school that is not accredited by the Department of 
Education to a District school shall be evaluated by District staff to determine the student’s appropriate 
grade placement. 
 
The Board of Education reserves the right, after a hearing before the Board, not to allow any person who 
has been expelled from another district to enroll as a student until the time of the person’s expulsion has 
expired. 
 

Except as otherwise required or permitted by law, the responsibility for transportation of any nonresident 
student admitted to a school in this District shall be borne by the student or the student’s parents. The 
District and the resident district may enter into a written agreement with the student or student’s parents 
to provide transportation to or from the District, or both. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-316 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-317 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-318 
A.C.A. § 6-18-510 
 A.C.A. § 6-15-504 
 A.C.A. § 9-28-113(b)(4) 
 A.C.A. § 9-28-205 
State Board of Education Standards of Accreditation 12.05 
Date Adopted: August 9, 2007 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
4.5 – SCHOOL CHOICE 
 
 
 
 
. Standard School Choice 
 
Definition 
"Sibling" means each of two (2) or more children having a common parent in common by blood, 
adoption, marriage, or foster care. 
 
Transfers Into the District 
Capacity Determination and Public Pronouncement 
The Board of Directors adopted a resolution containing the capacity standards for the District. The 
resolution contains the acceptance determination criteria identified by academic program, class, grade 
level, and individual school. The school is not obligated to add any teachers, other staff, or classrooms to 
accommodate choice applications. The District may only deny a Standard School Choice application if 
the District has a lack of capacity by the District having reached ninety percent (90%) of the maximum 
student population in a program, class, grade level, or school building authorized by the Standards or 
other State/Federal law. 
 
The District shall advertise in appropriate broadcast media and either print media or on the Internet to 
inform students and parents in adjoining districts of the range of possible openings available under the 
School Choice program. The public pronouncements shall state the application deadline and the 
requirements and procedures for participation in the program. Such pronouncements shall be made in the 
spring, but in no case later than March 1. 
 
Application Process 
The student's parent shall submit a school choice application on a form approved by ADE to this district. 
The transfer application must be postmarked or hand delivered on or before May 1 of the year preceding 
the fall semester the applicant would begin school in the District. The District shall date and time stamp 
all applications as they are received in the District's central office. It is the District’s responsibility to send 
a copy of the application that includes the date and time stamp to the student’s resident district. 
Applications postmarked or hand delivered on or after May 2 will not be accepted. Statutorily, preference 
is required to be given to siblings of students who are already enrolled in the District. Therefore, siblings 
whose applications fit the capacity standards approved by the Board of Directors may be approved ahead 
of an otherwise qualified non-sibling applicant who submitted an earlier application as identified by the 
application's date and time stamp. 
 
The approval of any application for a choice transfer into the District is potentially limited by the 
applicant's resident district's statutory limitation of losing no more than three percent (3%) of its past 
year's student enrollment due to Standard School Choice. As such, any District approval of a choice 

application prior to July 1 is provisional pending a determination that the resident district's three percent 
(3%) cap has not been reached. 
 
The Superintendent will consider all properly submitted applications for School Choice. By July 1, the 
Superintendent shall notify the parent and the student’s resident district, in writing, of the decision to 
accept or reject the application. 
 
Accepted Applications 
Applications which fit within the District's stated capacity standards shall be provisionally accepted, in 
writing, with the notification letter stating a reasonable timeline by which the student shall enroll in the 
District by taking the steps detailed in the letter, including submission of all required documents. If the 
student fails to enroll within the stated timeline, or if all necessary steps to complete the enrollment are 
not taken, or examination of the documentation indicates the applicant does not meet the District's stated 
capacity standards, the acceptance shall be null and void. 
 
A student, whose application has been accepted and who has enrolled in the District, is eligible to 
continue enrollment until completing his/her secondary education. Continued enrollment is conditioned 
upon the student meeting applicable statutory and District policy requirements. Any student who has been 
accepted under choice and who either fails to initially enroll under the timelines and provisions provided 
in this policy or who chooses to return to his/her resident district voids the transfer and must reapply if, in 
the future, the student seeks another school choice transfer. A subsequent transfer application will be 
subject to the capacity standards applicable to the year in which the application is considered by the 
District. 
 
A present or future sibling of a student who continues enrollment in this District may enroll in the District 
by submitting a Standard School Choice application. Applications of siblings of presently enrolled choice 
students are subject to the provisions of this policy including the capacity standards applicable to the year 
in which the sibling's application is considered by the District. A sibling who enrolls in the District 
through Standard School choice is eligible to remain in the District until completing his/her secondary 
education. 
 
Students whose applications have been accepted and who have enrolled in the district shall not be 
discriminated against on the basis of gender, national origin, race, ethnicity, religion, or disability. 
 
Rejected Applications 
The District may reject an application for a transfer into the District under Standard School Choice due to 
a lack of capacity. However, the decision to accept or reject an application may not be based on the 
student’s previous academic achievement, athletic or other extracurricular ability, English proficiency 
level, or previous disciplinary proceedings other than a current expulsion. 
 
An application may be provisionally rejected if it is for an opening that was included in the District's 
capacity resolution, but was provisionally filled by an earlier applicant. If the provisionally approved 
applicant subsequently does not enroll in the District, the provisionally rejected applicant could be 
provisionally approved and would have to meet the acceptance requirements to be eligible to enroll in the 
district. 
 
Rejection of applications shall be in writing and shall state the reason(s) for the rejection. A student 
whose application was rejected may request a hearing before the State Board of Education to reconsider 
the application which must be done, in writing to the State Board within ten (10) days of receiving the 
rejection letter from the District. 
 
Any applications that are denied due to the student’s resident district reaching the three percent (3%) 
limitation cap shall be given priority for a choice transfer the following year in the order that the District 
received the original applications. 

 
Transfers Out of the District 
All Standard School Choice applications shall be granted unless the approval would cause the District to 
have a net enrollment loss (students transferring out minus those transferring in) of more than three 
percent (3%) of the average daily membership on October 15 of the immediately preceding year. By 
December 15 of each year, ADE shall determine and notify the District of the net number of allowable 
choice transfers. For the purpose of determining the three percent (3%) cap, siblings are counted as one 
student, and students are not counted if the student transfers from a school or district in: 
. Academic Distress under either A.C.A. § 6-15-430(c)(1) or A.C.A. § 6-18-227; or 
. Facilities Distress under A.C.A. § 6-21-812. 
 
If, prior to July 1, the District receives sufficient copies of requests from other districts for its students to 
transfer to other districts to trigger the three percent (3%) cap, it shall notify each district the District 
received Standard School Choice applications from that it has tentatively reached the limitation cap. The 
District will use confirmations of approved choice applications from receiving districts to make a final 
determination of which applications it received that exceeded the limitation cap and notify each district 
that was the recipient of an application to that effect. 
 
Facilities Distress School Choice Applications 
There are a few exceptions from the provisions of the rest of this policy that govern choice transfers 
triggered by facilities distress. Any student attending a school district that has been identified as being in 
facilities distress may transfer under the provisions of this policy, but with the following four (4) 
differences. 
. The receiving district cannot be in facilities distress; 
. The transfer is only available for the duration of the time the student's resident district remains in 
distress; 
. The student is not required to meet the June 1 application deadline; and 
. The student's resident district is responsible for the cost of transporting the student to this District's 
school. 
 
. Opportunity School Choice 
Transfers Into or Within the District 
For the purposes of this section of the policy, a “lack of capacity” is defined as when the receiving school 
has reached the maximum student-to-teacher ratio allowed under federal or state law, the ADE Rules for 
the Standards of Accreditation, or other applicable rules. There is a lack of capacity if, as of the date of 
the application for Opportunity School Choice, ninety-five percent (95%) or more of the seats at the grade 
level at the nonresident school are filled. 
 
Unless there is a lack of capacity at the District’s school or the transfer conflicts with the provisions of a 
federal desegregation order applicable to the District, a student who is enrolled in or assigned to a school 
classified by the ADE to be in academic distress is eligible to transfer to the school closest to the student’s 
legal residence that is not in academic distress. The student’s parent or guardian, or the student if over the 
age of eighteen (18), must successfully complete the necessary application process by July 30 preceding 
the initial year of desired enrollment. 
 
Within thirty (30) days from receipt of an application from a student seeking admission under this section 
of the policy, the Superintendent shall notify in writing the parent or guardian, or the student if the student 
is over eighteen (18) years of age, whether the Opportunity School Choice application has been accepted 
or rejected. The notification shall be sent via First-Class Mail to the address on the application. 
 
If the application is accepted, the notification letter shall state the deadline by which the student must 
enroll in the receiving school or the transfer will be null and void. 
 

If the District rejects the application, the District shall state in the notification letter the specific reasons 
for the rejection. A parent or guardian, or the student if the student is over eighteen (18) years of age, 
may appeal the District’s decision to deny the application to the State Board of Education. The appeal 
must be in writing to the State Board of Education via certified mail, return receipt requested, no later 
than ten (10) calendar days, excluding weekends and legal holidays, after the notice of rejection was 
received from the District. 
 
A student’s enrollment under Opportunity School Choice is irrevocable for the duration of the school year 
and is renewable until the student completes high school or is beyond the legal age of enrollment. This 
provision for continuing eligibility under Opportunity Choice does not negate the student's right to apply 
for transfer to a district other than the student's assigned school or resident district under the Standard 
School Choice provisions of this policy. 
 
The District may, but is not obligated to provide transportation to and from the transferring district. 
 
Transfers out of, or within, the District 
If a District school or the District has been classified by the ADE as being in academic distress the 
District shall timely notify the parent, guardian, or student, if the student is over eighteen (18) years of 
age, as soon as practicable after the academic distress designation is made of all options available under 
Opportunity Choice. The District shall offer the parent or guardian, or the student if the student is over 
eighteen (18) years of age, an opportunity to enroll the student in any public school or school district that 
has not been classified by the ADE as a public school or school district in academic distress. 
 
Additionally, the District shall request public service announcements to be made over the broadcast media 
and in the print media at such times and in such a manner as to inform parents or guardians of students in 
adjoining districts of the availability of the program, the application deadline, and the requirements and 
procedure for nonresident students to participate in the program. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-1-106 
A.C.A. § 6-13-113 
A.C.A. § 6-15-430(b) 
A.C.A. § 6-18-227 
A.C.A. § 6-18-510 
A.C.A. § 6-18-1901 et seq. 
A.C.A. § 6-21-812 
ADE Rules Governing the Guidelines, Procedures and Enforcement of the Arkansas Opportunity 
Public School Choice Act 
Date Adopted: April 16, 2013 Last Revised: April 17, 2015 
 
 
DREW CENTRAL/MONTICELLO FREEDOM OF CHOICE GUIDELINES 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Any student in the Monticello School District may choose to attend Drew Central Schools on a 
Freedom of Choice form completed by May 1 for the following school term. 
 
2. Students moving into the Monticello District or the Drew Central District after May 1 can choose 
their place of attendance on a Freedom of Choice form before enrolling in any school. 
 
3. Students who live in the Monticello School District and have been attending Monticello cannot 
transfer to the Drew Central District during the year unless they receive a legal transfer or their 
family moves to the Drew Central District. 
 
4. Students living in the Drew Central District and attending Monticello Schools on a Freedom of 
Choice or transfer can return at any time to the Drew Central Schools. 

 
5. Students who live in the Drew Central District and are attending the Drew Central Schools will be 
allowed to stay in Drew Central on a Freedom of Choice form if their parents move to the 
Monticello District. 
 
 
4.6 – HOME SCHOOLING 
 
 
Parents or legal guardians desiring to provide a home school for their children must give written notice to the 
Superintendent of their intent to do so and sign a waiver acknowledging that the State of Arkansas is not liable for 
the education of their children during the time the parents choose to home school. Notice shall be given: 
1. At the beginning of each school year, but no later than August 15; 
2. By December 15 for parents who decide to start home schooling at the beginning of the spring semester; or 
3. Fourteen (14) calendar days prior to withdrawing the child (provided the student is not currently under 
disciplinary action for violation of any written school policy, including, but not limited to, excessive 
absences) and at the beginning of each school year thereafter. 
 
The parents or legal guardians shall deliver written notice in person to the Superintendent the first time such notice is 
given and the notice must include: 
1. The name, date of birth, grade level, and the name and address of the school last attended, if any; 
2. The location of the home school; 
3. The basic core curriculum to be offered; 
4. The proposed schedule of instruction; and 
5. The qualifications of the parent-teacher. 
 
To aid the District in providing a free and appropriate public education to students in need of special education 
services, the parents or legal guardians home-schooling their children shall provide information which might 
indicate the need for special education services. 
Any student transferring from home school to a District school shall be evaluated by District staff to determine the 
student’s appropriate grade placement. The District specifically reserves the right to utilize various assessment 
techniques to determine appropriate grade placement. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-15-503 
 A.C.A. § 6-41-206 
Adopted: Revised: 4-1-12 
 
 
4.7—ABSENCES 
 
 
 
If any student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan conflicts with this policy, the 
requirements of the student’s IEP or 504 Plan take precedence. 
 
Education is more than the grades students receive in their courses. Important as that is, students’ regular 
attendance at school is essential to their social and cultural development and helps prepare them to accept 
responsibilities they will face as an adult. Interactions with other students and participation in the 
instruction within the classroom enrich the learning environment and promote a continuity of instruction 
which results in higher student achievement. 
 
Absences for students enrolled in digital courses shall be determined by the online attendance and time 
the student is working on the course rather than the student’s physical presence at school. Students who 
are scheduled to have a dedicated period for a digital class shall not be considered absent if the student 
logs the correct amount of time and completes any required assignments; however, a student who fails to 
be physically present for an assigned period may be disciplined in accordance with the District’s truancy 
policy. 
 
 

Excused Absences 
Excused absences are those where the student was on official school business or when the absence was 
due to one of the following reasons and the student brings a written statement to the principal or designee 
upon his/her return to school from the parent or legal guardian stating such reason. 
1. The student’s illness or when attendance could jeopardize the health of other students. A maximum of 
six (6) such days are allowed per semester unless the condition(s) causing such absences is of a 
chronic or recurring nature, is medically documented, and approved by the principal. 
2. Death or serious illness in their immediate family; 
3. Observance of recognized holidays observed by the student's faith; 
4. Attendance at an appointment with a government agency; 
5. Attendance at a medical appointment; 
6. Exceptional circumstances with prior approval of the principal; 
7. Participation in an FFA, FHA, or 4-H sanctioned activity; 
8. Participation in the election poll workers program for high school students. 
9. Absences granted to allow a student to visit his/her parent or legal guardian who is a member of the 
military and been called to active duty, is on leave from active duty, or has returned from deployment 
to a combat zone or combat support posting. The number of additional excused absences shall be at 
the discretion of the superintendent or designee. 
10. Absences granted, at the Superintendent's discretion, to seventeen (17) year-old students who join the 
Arkansas National Guard while in eleventh grade to complete basic combat training between grades 
eleven (11) and (12). 
11. Absences for students excluded from school by the Arkansas Department of Health during a disease 
outbreak because the student has an immunization waiver or whose immunizations are not up to date.3 
 
Students who serve as pages for a member of the General Assembly shall be considered on instructional 
assignment and shall not be considered absent from school for the day the student is serving as a page.4 
 
Unexcused Absences 
Absences not defined above or not having an accompanying note from the parent or legal guardian, 
presented in the timeline required by this policy, shall be considered as unexcused absences. Students 
with ten (10) unexcused absences in a course in a semester may not receive credit for that course. At the 
discretion of the principal after consultation with persons having knowledge of the circumstances of the 
unexcused absences, the student may be denied promotion or graduation. Excessive absences shall not be 
a reason for expulsion or dismissal of a student. 
 
When a student has five (5) unexcused absences, his/her parents, guardians, or persons in loco parentis 
shall be notified. Notification shall be by telephone by the end of the school day in which such absence 
occurred or by regular mail with a return address sent no later than the following school day. 
 
A second letter will be sent to parents, guardians, or persons in loco parentis when the student has eight 
(8) unexcused absences. Notification may be by telephone by the end of the school day in which such 
absence occurred or by regular mail with a return address sent no later than the following school day. 
 
Whenever a student exceeds ten (10) unexcused absences in a semester, the District shall notify the 
prosecuting authority and the parent, guardian, or persons in loco parentis shall be subject to a civil 
penalty as prescribed by law. 
 
It is the Arkansas General Assembly’s intention that students having excessive absences be given 
assistance in obtaining credit for their courses. Therefore, at any time prior to when a student exceeds the 
number of unexcused absences permitted by this policy, the student, or his/her parent, guardian, or person 
in loco parentis may petition the school or district’s administration for special arrangements to address the 
student’s unexcused absences. If formal arrangements are granted, they shall be formalized into a written 
agreement which will include the conditions of the agreement and the consequences for failing to fulfill 

the agreement’s requirements. The agreement shall be signed by the student, the student’s parent, 
guardian, or person in loco parentis, and the school or district administrator or designee. 
 
Students who attend in-school suspension shall not be counted absent for those days. 
 
Days missed due to out-of-school suspension or expulsion shall be unexcused absences. 
 
The District shall notify the Department of Finance and Administration whenever a student fourteen (14) 
years of age or older is no longer in school. The Department of Finance and Administration is required to 
suspend the former student’s operator’s license unless he/she meets certain requirements specified in the 
statute. 
 
Applicants for an instruction permit or for a driver's license by persons less than eighteen (18) years old 
on October 1 of any year are required to provide proof of a high school diploma or enrollment and regular 
attendance in an adult education program or a public, private, or parochial school prior to receiving an 
instruction permit. To be issued a driver's license, a student enrolled in school shall present proof of a “C” 
average for the previous semester or similar equivalent grading period for which grades are reported as 
part of the student’s permanent record. 
Cross References: 4.8—MAKE-UP WORK 
4.57—IMMUNIZATIONS 
5.11—DIGITAL LEARNING COURSES 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
A.C.A. § 6-18-209 
A.C.A. § 6-18-220 
A.C.A. § 6-18-222 
A.C.A. § 6-18-229 
A.C.A. § 6-18-231 
A.C.A. § 6-18-507(g) 
A.C.A. § 6-18-702 
A.C.A. § 7-4-116 
A.C.A. § 9-28-113(f) 
A.C.A. § 27-16-701 
Arkansas Department of Education Rules Governing Distance and Digital Learning 
 
Date Adopted: June 30, 2011 Last Revised: April 2016 
 
 
4.8 – MAKE-UP WORK 
 
 
 
Students who miss school due to an excused absence shall be allowed to make up the work they missed 
during their absence under the following rules. 
1. Students are responsible for asking the teachers of the classes they missed what assignments they 
need to make up. 
2. Teachers are responsible for providing the missed assignments when asked by a returning 
student. 
3. Students are required to ask for their assignments on their first day back at school or their first 
class day after their return. 
4. Make-up tests are to be rescheduled at the discretion of the teacher, but must be aligned with the 
schedule of the missed work to be made up. 
5. Students shall have three class days to make up their work when they are absent. 
6. Make-up work which is not turned in within the make-up schedule for that assignment shall 
receive a zero. 
7. Students are responsible for turning in their make-up work without the teacher having to ask for 
it. 
8. Students who are absent on the day their make-up work is due must turn in their work the day 
they return to school whether or not the class for which the work is due meets the day of their 
return. 
9. Work may not be made up for credit for unexcused absences unless the unexcused absences are 
part of a signed agreement as permitted by policy 4.7—ABSENCES. Out-of-school suspensions 

are unexcused absences. Work missed while a student is expelled from school may not be made 
up for credit and students shall receive a zero for missed assignments. In lieu of the timeline 
above, assignments for students who are excluded from school by the Arkansas Department of 
Health during a disease outbreak are to be made up as set forth in Policy 4.57— 
IMMUNIZATIONS. 
(Exception: As required/permitted by the student’s Individual Education Program or 504 
Plan) 
Cross References: 4.7—ABSENCES, 4.57—IMMUNIZATIONS 
Date Adopted: November 10, 2005 Last Revised: January 23, 2015 
 
 
4.9 – TARDIES 
 
 
 
POLICY REGARDING TARDINESS AND EARLY CHECK OUT 
Prompt arrival at school is expected of all students. Late arrival disrupts class and causes loss of 
instructional time. Students arriving after the tardy bell will be marked tardy. 
A student will not be counted tardy due to the arrival of a late bus on which the student is riding. 
Students who arrive late must come by the Middle School Office to check-in and pick up a tardy slip to 
present to their teacher. 
Students will be counted present a full day if they are in attendance the whole school day session, 7:50 
a.m. – 3:15 p.m. One-half day is counted present from 7:50 a.m. – 11:46 a.m. or 11:47 a.m. – 3:15 p.m. 
Half-days will count toward excessive absences. 
A student’s parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis will be notified when the student has been tardy 
three (3), four (4), five (5), six (6) and nine (9) times. 
 
TARDY POLICY 
Students are expected to be present for class on time and prepared with all necessary materials to 
participate in class. Tardies start over every nine weeks. 
Violation of this policy within a nine-week grading period will result in: 
o 3 Tardies: Issued Warning 
o 4th & 5th Tardies: Detention Hall or student may take corporal punishment for the first 
detention assignment in a nine-week period. 
o 6 Tardies: 3 days In School Suspension 
o 9 Tardies: Will be referred to the Truancy Officer 
* A student who accumulates more than 9 tardies in a nine-week grading period will be placed under 
administrative review of their placement in school through a parent conference. 
 
7th & 8th Grade Bell Schedule 
7:50 
First Bell 
7:54 – 8:46 
1st Period (tardy bell 7:55) 
8:50 – 9:42 
2nd Period 
9:46 – 10:38 
3rd Period 
10:42 – 11:34 
4th Period 
11:34 – 12:06 7 – 8 Lunch 
12:10 – 1:24 5th Period 
1:28 – 2:20 
6th Period 
2:24 – 3:15 
7th Period 
 
 
 
 
 

 
4.10 – CLOSED CAMPUS 
 
 
 
 
Drew Central Middle School is a closed campus. In order to insure the safety of our students, all parents 
and other visitors must report to the office upon arrival, sign in, and pick up a visitor’s pass before going 
to any area of the campus. Upon leaving, the visitor must return to the office and check out. Students are 
to remain on campus and to leave only with the permission of the principal and the student’s parents. 
Students are not to be in the parking lot at any time or to visit with persons in parked cars in the 
parking lots or on the streets. Detention assignments and possible suspension will result for students 
choosing to violate this regulation. 
Students are not to invite, encourage, or bring visitors/pets to school for any reason without permission 
from the principal or his/her designee. Any person needing to see a student during the school day must 
check through the principal’s office for permission to be on campus. No loitering on campus by 
unauthorized visitors. 
Notice: The back doors to the Middle School will be locked between 8:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. each 
day to help ensure the safety of our students and staff. Please enter the middle school at the front 
entrance and sign in at the office anytime you visit our school. We would also love for you to come 
to eat lunch with your child(ren). Safety of our students is our first and foremost concern! 
 
 RELEASE OF PUPILS 
 
 
 
 
 
Definite procedures are followed to assure the safety of children who are released during the day. 
1. Parent permission in writing or by telephone is required before a child will be allowed to leave 
during the day. 
2. The parent (or other named adult in the note or telephone conversation) should come to the 
office and sign for the child. All students MUST be signed out in the office. 
 Students will remain with the teacher until notified by the office that they have been checked out. 
The student will then report to the designated office to be picked up by the authorized person. 
3. If your plans change during the day, please call the school no later than 2:30 p.m. to assure that 
your child receives the message. NO ONE will be permitted to check out a child directly from the 
classroom. 
4. If any person other than the parent or guardian is to pick up the child, the school MUST 
HAVE a statement from the parent specifying necessary information. 
 
 
 TRANSFERRING CHILDREN BETWEEN CUSTODIAL AND NON-CUSTODIAL PARENTS: ACT 660 of 1993 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SECTION 1. (a) In order to avoid continuing child custody controversies from involving public school 
personnel, and to avoid disruptions to the educational atmosphere in our public schools, the transfer of a 
child between the child’s custodial parent and non-custodial parent, when both parents are present, is 
prohibited from taking place on the property of a public elementary or secondary school on normal school 
days during normal hours of school operations. 
 
SECTION 1. (b) The provisions of this act shall not prohibit one parent (custodial or non-custodial) from 
picking the child up from school at pre-arranged times on pre-arranged days if prior approval has been 
made with the school’s principal. 
 
Come to school, meet us, talk to us and volunteer your time and energy. Your involvement will show 
your children that you value their education. 
Parents count! Let’s work together! 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/14/2012 
 

 
 
4.11 – EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
 
 
 
 
No student in the Drew Central School District shall, on the grounds of race, color, religion, national 
origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, or disability be excluded from participation in, or 
denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity sponsored 
by the District. The District has a limited open forum granting equal access to the Boy Scouts of America 
and other youth groups.1 
Inquiries on non discrimination may be directed to Kim Barnes2, who may be reached at 367-53693. 
For further information on notice of non-discrimination or to file a complaint, visit 
http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/contactus.cfm; for the address and phone number of the office 
that serves your area, or call 1-800-421-3481Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-514 
28 C.F.R. § 35.106 
 34 C.F.R. § 100.6 
 34 C.F.R. § 104.8 
 34 C.F.R. § 106.9 
 34 C.F.R. § 108.9 
 34 C.F.R. § 110.25 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
4.12 – STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS/EQUAL ACCESS 
 
 
 
 
Non-curriculum-related secondary school student organizations wishing to conduct meetings on school 
premises during non-instructional time shall not be denied equal access on the basis of the religious, 
political, philosophical, or other content of the speech at such meetings. Such meetings must meet the 
following criteria. 
1. The meeting is to be voluntary and student initiated; 
2. There is no sponsorship of the meeting by the school, the government, or its agents or employees; 
3. The meeting must occur during non-instructional time; 
4. Employees or agents of the school are present at religious meetings only in a non-participatory 
capacity; 
5. The meeting does not materially and substantially interfere with the orderly conduct of educational 
activities within the school; and 
6. Non-school persons may not direct, conduct, control, or regularly attend activities of student groups. 
 
All meetings held on school premises must be scheduled and approved by the principal. The school, its 
agents, and employees retain the authority to maintain order and discipline, to protect the well-being of 
students and faculty, and to assure that attendance of students at meetings is voluntary. 
 
Fraternities, sororities, and secret societies are forbidden in the District’s schools. Membership to student 
organizations shall not be by a vote of the organization’s members, nor be restricted by the student’s race, 
religion, sex, national origin, or other arbitrary criteria. Hazing, as defined by law, is forbidden in 
connection with initiation into, or affiliation with, any student organization, extracurricular activity or 
sport program. Students who are convicted of participation in hazing or the failure to report hazing shall 
be expelled. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-5-201 et seq. 
 A.C.A. § 6-21-201 et seq. 
 20 U.S.C. 4071 Equal Access Act 
Board of Education of the Westside Community Schools v. Mergens, 496 U.S. 226 (1990) 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-601 et seq. 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: January 7, 2016 
 
 
 
 

 
4.13 – PRIVACY OF STUDENTS’ RECORDS/DIRECTORY INFORMATION 
 
 
 
 
Except when a court order regarding a student has been presented to the district to the contrary, all 
students’ education records are available for inspection and copying by the parent of his/her student who 
is under the age of eighteen (18). At the age of eighteen (18), the right to inspect and copy a student’s 
records transfers to the student. A student’s parent or the student, if over the age of 18, requesting to 
review the student’s education records will be allowed to do so within no more than forty five (45) days 
of the request. The district forwards education records, including disciplinary records, to schools that 
have requested them and in which the student seeks or intends to enroll, or is already enrolled so long as 
the disclosure is for purposes related to the student's enrollment or transfer. 
 
The district shall receive written permission before releasing education records to any agency or 
individual not authorized by law to receive and/or view the education records without prior parental 
permission. The District shall maintain a record of requests by such agencies or individuals for access to, 
and each disclosure of, personally identifiable information (PII) from the education records of each 
student. Disclosure of education records is authorized by law to school officials with legitimate 
educational interests. A personal record kept by a school staff member is not considered an education 
record if it meets the following tests. 
1. It is in the sole possession of the individual who made it; 
2. It is used only as a personal memory aid; and 
3. Information contained in it has never been revealed or made available to any other person, except 
the maker’s temporary substitute. 
 
For the purposes of this policy a school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, 
supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement 
unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has 
contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a 
parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or 
assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. 
For the purposes of this policy a school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to 
review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility, contracted duty, or 
duty of elected office. 
 
In addition to releasing PII to school officials without permission, the District may disclose PII from the 
education records of students in foster care placement to the student’s caseworker or to the caseworker’s 
representative without getting prior consent of the parent (or the student if the student is over eighteen 
(18)). For the District to release the student’s PII without getting permission: 
1. The student must be in foster care; 
2. The individual to whom the PII will be released must have legal access to the student’s case plan; 
and 
3. The Arkansas Department of Human Services, or a sub-agency of the Department, must be 
legally responsible for the care and protection of the student. 
 
The District discloses PII from an education record to appropriate parties, including parents, in connection 
with an emergency if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the 
student or other individuals. The superintendent or designee shall determine who will have access to and 
the responsibility for disclosing information in emergency situations. 
 
When deciding whether to release PII in a health or safety emergency, the District may take into account 
the totality of the circumstances pertaining to a threat to the health or safety of a student or other 
individuals. If the District determines that there is an articulable and significant threat to the health or 
safety of a student or other individuals, it may disclose information from education records to any person 

whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other 
individuals. 
 
For purposes of this policy, the Drew Central School District does not distinguish between a custodial and 
noncustodial parent, or a non-parent such as a person acting in loco parentis or a foster parent with respect 
to gaining access to a student’s records. Unless a court order restricting such access has been presented to 
the district to the contrary, the fact of a person’s status as parent or guardian, alone, enables that parent or 
guardian to review and copy his child’s records. 
 
If there exists a court order which directs that a parent not have access to a student or his/her records, the 
parent, guardian, person acting in loco parentis, or an agent of the Department of Human Services must 
present a file-marked copy of such order to the building principal and the superintendent. The school will 
make good-faith efforts to act in accordance with such court order, but the failure to do so does not 
impose legal liability upon the school. The actual responsibility for enforcement of such court orders rests 
with the parents or guardians, their attorneys and the court which issued the order. 
 
A parent or guardian does not have the right to remove any material from a student’s records, but such 
parent or guardian may challenge the accuracy of a record. The right to challenge the accuracy of a record 
does not include the right to dispute a grade, disciplinary rulings, disability placements, or other such 
determinations, which must be done only through the appropriate teacher and/or administrator, the 
decision of whom is final. A challenge to the accuracy of material contained in a student’s file must be 
initiated with the building principal, with an appeal available to the Superintendent or his/her designee. 
The challenge shall clearly identify the part of the student’s record the parent wants changed and specify 
why he/she believes it is inaccurate or misleading. If the school determines not to amend the record as 
requested, the school will notify the requesting parent or student of the decision and inform them of their 
right to a hearing regarding the request for amending the record. The parent or eligible student will be 
provided information regarding the hearing procedure when notified of the right to a hearing. 
 
Unless the parent or guardian of a student (or student, if above the age of eighteen [18]) objects, 
"directory information" about a student may be made available to the public, military recruiters, post-
secondary educational institutions, prospective employers of those students, as well as school publications 
such as annual yearbooks and graduation announcements. “Directory information” includes, but is not 
limited to, a student’s name, address, telephone number, electronic mail address, photograph, date and 
place of birth, dates of attendance, his/her placement on the honor roll (or the receipt of other types of 
honors), as well as his/her participation in school clubs and extracurricular activities, among others. If the 
student participates in inherently public activities (for example, basketball, football, or other 
interscholastic activities), the publication of such information will be beyond the control of the District. 
"Directory information" also includes a student identification (ID) number, user ID, or other unique 
personal identifier used by a student for purposes of accessing or communicating in electronic systems 
and a student ID number or other unique personal identifier that is displayed on a student's ID badge, 
provided the ID cannot be used to gain access to education records except when used in conjunction with 
one or more factors that authenticate the user's identity, such as a personal identification number (PIN), 
password or other factor known or possessed only by the authorized user. 
 
A student’s name and photograph will only be displayed on the district or school’s web page(s) after 
receiving the written permission from the student’s parent or student if over the age of 18. 
 
The form for objecting to making directory information available is located in the back of the student 
handbook and must be completed and signed by the parent or age-eligible student and filed with the 
building principal’s office no later than ten (10) school days after the beginning of each school year or the 
date the student is enrolled for school. Failure to file an objection by that time is considered a specific 
grant of permission. The district is required to continue to honor any signed-opt out form for any student 
no longer in attendance at the district. 
 

The right to opt out of the disclosure of directory information under Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act (FERPA) does not prevent the District from disclosing or requiring a student to disclose the 
student's name, identifier, or institutional email address in a class in which the student is enrolled. 
 
Parents and students over the age of 18 who believe the district has failed to comply with the 
requirements for the lawful release of student records may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of 
Education (DOE) at: 
Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202 
Cross References: Policy 4.34—Communicable Diseases and Parasites 
 Policy 5.20—District Web Site 
 Policy 5.20.1—Web Site Privacy Policy 
 Policy 5.20F1—Permission to Display Photo of Student on Web Site 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 9-28 -113(b)(6) 
20 U.S.C. § 1232g 
20 U.S.C. § 7908 
34 CFR 99.3, 99.7, 99.21, 99.22, 99.30, 99.31, 99.32, 99.33, 99.34, 99.35, 99.36, 99.37, 99.63, 99.64 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
4.14 – STUDENT PUBLICATIONS & THE DISTRIBUTION OF LITERATURE 
 
 
 
 
 
Student Publications 
All publications that are supported financially by the school or by use of school facilities, or are produced in 
conjunction with a class shall be considered school-sponsored publications. School publications do not provide a 
forum for public expression. Such publications, as well as the content of student expression in school-sponsored 
activities, shall be subject to the editorial control of the District’s administration whose actions shall be reasonably 
related to legitimate pedagogical concerns and adhere to the following limitations. 
 
1. Advertising may be accepted for publications that does not condone or promote products that are 
inappropriate for the age and maturity of the audience or that endorses such things as tobacco, alcohol, or 
drugs. 
2. Publications may be regulated to prohibit writings which are, in the opinion of the appropriate teacher 
and/or administrator, ungrammatical, poorly written, inadequately researched, biased or prejudiced, vulgar 
or profane, or unsuitable for immature audiences. 
3. Publications may be regulated to refuse to publish material which might reasonably be perceived to 
advocate drug or alcohol use, irresponsible sex, or conduct otherwise inconsistent with the shared values of 
a civilized social order, or to associate the school with any position other than neutrality on matters of 
political controversy. 
4. Prohibited publications include: 
a. Those that are obscene as to minors; 
b. Those that are libelous or slanderous, including material containing defamatory falsehoods about 
public figures or governmental officials, which are made with knowledge of their falsity or reckless 
disregard of the truth; 
c. Those that constitute an unwarranted invasion of privacy as defined by state law, 
d. Publications that suggest or urge the commission of unlawful acts on the school premises; 
e. Publications which suggest or urge the violation of lawful school regulations; 
f. Hate literature that scurrilously attacks ethnic, religious, or racial groups. 
 
Student Publications on School Web Pages 
Student publications that are displayed on school web pages shall follow the same guidelines as listed above plus 
they shall: 
1. Not contain any non-educational advertisements. Additionally, student web publications shall; 

2. Adhere to the restrictions regarding use of Directory Information as prescribed in Policy 4.13 including not 
using a student’s photograph when associated with the student’s name unless written permission has been 
received from the student’s parent or student if over the age of 18. 
3. State that the views expressed are not necessarily those of the School Board or the employees of the district. 
 
Student Distribution of Non-school Literature, Publications, and Materials 
A student or group of students who distribute ten (10) or fewer copies of the same non-school literature, 
publications, or materials (hereinafter “non-school materials”), shall do so in a time, place, and manner that does not 
cause a substantial disruption of the orderly education environment. A student or group of students wishing to 
distribute more than ten (10) copies of non-school materials shall have school authorities review their non-school 
materials at least three (3) school days in advance of their desired time of dissemination. School authorities shall 
review the non-school materials, prior to their distribution and will bar from distribution those non-school materials 
that are obscene, libelous, pervasively indecent, or advertise unlawful products or services. Material may also be 
barred from distribution if there is evidence that reasonably supports a forecast that a substantial disruption of the 
orderly operation of the school or educational environment will likely result from the distribution. Concerns related 
to any denial of distribution by the principal shall be heard by the superintendent, whose decision shall be final. 
 
The school principal or designee shall establish reasonable regulations governing the time, place, and manner of 
student distribution of non-school materials. 
 
The regulations shall: 
1. Be narrowly drawn to promote orderly administration of school activities by preventing disruption and may 
not be designed to stifle expression; 
2. Be uniformly applied to all forms of non-school materials; 
3. Allow no interference with classes or school activities; 
4. Specify times, places, and manner where distribution may and may not occur; and 
5. Not inhibit a person’s right to accept or reject any literature distributed in accordance with the regulations. 
6. Students shall be responsible for the removal of excess literature that is left at the distribution point for more 
than 10 days. 
 
The Superintendent, along with the student publications advisors, shall develop administrative regulations for the 
implementation of this policy. The regulations shall include definitions of terms and timelines for the review of 
materials. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-1202, 1203, & 1204 
 Tinker v. Des Moines ISD, 393 U.S. 503 (1969) 
 Bethel School District No. 403 v. Fraser, 478 U.S. 675 (1986) 
 Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, 484 U.S. 260 (1988) 
Date Adopted: 08/09/2007 Last Revised: 08/14/2008 
 
 
4.15 – CONTACT WITH STUDENTS WHILE AT SCHOOL 
 
 
 
 
CONTACT BY PARENTS 
Parents wishing to speak to their children during the school day shall register first with the office. 
 
CONTACT BY NON-CUSTODIAL PARENTS 
If there is any question concerning the legal custody of the student, the custodial parent shall present 
documentation to the principal or the principal’s designee establishing the parent’s custody of the student. 
It shall be the responsibility of the custodial parent to make any court ordered “no contact” or other 
restrictions regarding the non-custodial parent known to the principal by presenting a copy of a file-
marked court order. Without such a court order on file, the school will release the child to either of his/her 
parents. Non-custodial parents who file with the principal a date-stamped copy of current court orders 
granting visitation may eat lunch, volunteer in their child’s classroom, or otherwise have contact with 
their child during school hours and the prior approval of the school’s principal. Such contact is subject to 
the limitations outlined in Policy 4.16, Policy 6.5, and any other policies that may apply. 
 

Arkansas law provides that, In order to avoid continuing child custody controversies from involving 
school personnel and to avoid disruptions to the educational atmosphere in the District’s schools, the 
transfer of a child between his/her custodial parent and non-custodial parent, when both parents are 
present, shall not take place on the school’s property on normal school days during normal hours of 
school operation. The custodial or non-custodial parent may send to/drop off the student at school to be 
sent to/picked up by the other parent on predetermined days in accordance with any court order provided 
by the custodial parent or by a signed agreement between both the custodial and non-custodial parents 
that was witnessed by the student’s building principal.1 Unless a valid no-contact order has been filed with 
the student’s principal or the principal’s designee, district employees shall not become involved in 
disputes concerning whether or not that parent was supposed to pick up the student on any given day. 
 
CONTACT BY LAW ENFORCEMENT, SOCIAL SERVICES, OR BY COURT ORDER 
State Law requires that Department of Human Services employees, local law enforcement, or agents of 
the Crimes Against Children Division of the Department of Arkansas State Police, may interview students 
without a court order for the purpose of investigating suspected child abuse. In instances where the 
interviewers deem it necessary, they may exercise a “72-hour hold” without first obtaining a court order. 
Except as provided below, other questioning of students by non-school personnel shall be granted only 
with a court order directing such questioning, with permission of the parents of a student (or the student if 
above eighteen [18] years of age), or in response to a subpoena or arrest warrant. 
 
If the District makes a report to any law enforcement agency concerning student misconduct or if access 
to a student is granted to a law enforcement agency due to a court order, the principal or the principal’s 
designee shall make a good faith effort to contact the student’s parent, legal guardian, or other person 
having lawful control by court order, or person acting in loco parentis identified on student enrollment 
forms. The principal or the principal's designee shall not attempt to make such contact if presented 
documentation by the investigator that notification is prohibited because a parent, guardian, custodian, or 
person standing in loco parentis is named as an alleged offender of the suspected child maltreatment. This 
exception applies only to interview requests made by a law enforcement officer, an investigator of the 
Crimes Against Children Division of the Department of Arkansas State Police, or an investigator or 
employee of the Department of Human Services. 
 
In instances other than those related to cases of suspected child abuse, principals must release a student to 
either a police officer who presents a subpoena for the student, or a warrant for arrest, or to an agent of 
state social services or an agent of a court with jurisdiction over a child with a court order signed by a 
judge. Upon release of the student, the principal or designee shall give the student’s parent, legal 
guardian, or other person having lawful control by court order, or person acting in loco parentis notice 
that the student has been taken into custody by law enforcement personnel or a state’s social services 
agency. If the principal or designee is unable to reach the parent, he or she shall make a reasonable, good 
faith effort to get a message to the parent to call the principal or designee, and leave both a day and an 
after-hours telephone number. 
 
Contact by Professional Licensure Standards Board Investigators 
Investigators for the Professional Licensure Standards Board may meet with students during the school 
day to carry out the investigation of an ethics complaint. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-513 
A.C.A. § 9-13-104 
 A.C.A. § 12-18-609, 610, 613 
A.C.A. § 12-18-1001, 1005 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: April 2016 
 
 
4.16 – STUDENT VISITORS 
 
 
 
The board strongly believes that the purpose of school is for learning. Social visitors, generally, disrupt the 
classroom and interfere with learning that should be taking place. Therefore, visiting with students at school is 

strongly discouraged, unless approved by the principal and scheduled in advance. This includes visits made by 
former students, friends, and/or relatives of teachers or students. Any visitation to the classroom shall be allowed 
only with the permission of the school principal and all visitors must first register at the office. 
Cross References: For adult visits see Policy 4.15—CONTACT WITH STUDENTS WHILE AT SCHOOL and Policy 6.5—
VISITORS TO THE SCHOOLS 
 
Date Adopted: 11/10/2005 
 
 
4.17 – STUDENT DISCIPLINE 
 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School Board of Education has a responsibility to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the 
District’s students and employees. To help maintain a safe environment conducive to high student achievement, the 
Board establishes policies necessary to regulate student behavior to promote an orderly school environment that is 
respectful of the rights of others and ensures the uniform enforcement of student discipline. Students are responsible 
for their conduct that occurs: at any time on the school grounds; off school grounds at a school sponsored function, 
activity, or event; going to and from school or a school activity. 
 
The District’s administrators may also take disciplinary action against a student for off-campus conduct occurring at 
any time that would have a detrimental impact on school discipline, the educational environment, or the welfare of 
the students and/or staff. A student who has committed a criminal act while off campus and whose presence on 
campus could cause a substantial disruption to school or endanger the welfare of other students or staff is subject to 
disciplinary action up to and including expulsion. Such acts could include, but are not limited to a felony or an act 
that would be considered a felony if committed by an adult, an assault or battery, drug law violations, or sexual 
misconduct of a serious nature. Any disciplinary action pursued by the District shall be in accordance with the 
student’s appropriate due process rights. 
 
The District’s personnel policy committee shall review the student discipline policies annually and may recommend 
changes in the policies to the Drew Central School Board. The Board shall approve any changes to student 
discipline policies. 
 
The District’s student discipline policies shall be distributed to each student during the first week of school each year 
and to new students upon their enrollment. Each student’s parent or legal guardian shall sign and return to the school 
an acknowledgement form documenting that they have received the policies. 
 
It is required by law that the principal or the person in charge report to the police any incidents the person has 
personal knowledge of or has received information leading to a reasonable belief that a person has committed or 
threatened to commit an act of violence or any crime involving a deadly weapon on school property or while under 
school supervision. If the person making the report is not the Superintendent, that personal shall also inform the 
Superintendent of the incident. Additionally, the principal shall inform any school employee or other person who 
initially reported the incident that a report has been made to the appropriate law enforcement agency. The 
Superintendent or designee shall inform the Board of Directors of any such report made to law enforcement. 
Legal References: 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-502 
 A.C.A. § 6-17-113 
Date Adopted: 11/10/2005 Last Revised: 6/14/2012 
 
 
 
DISCIPLINE: INTRODUCTION & PURPOSE 
 
STUDENT DISCIPLINE – GENERAL STATEMENT OF JURISDICTION 
The primary objective of Drew Central Middle School Student Discipline Policy is to teach students to be 
responsible for their own behavior. We believe all students can behave appropriately while at school. 
We will not allow students to stop the teacher from teaching or prevent the other students from 
learning. The choice of behavior is the student’s. The school staff has the authority and responsibility to 

take fair and reasonable measures to maintain proper control and discipline among students placed in their 
care. Due process shall be given to all students prior to punishment. The rules listed should not be 
thought of as all inclusive. Any conduct that tends to disrupt the educational programs will be grounds 
for disciplinary actions. All students in the Drew Central Middle School shall comply with the policies in 
this handbook and any other reasonable instructions while on the school campus, on or off school 
grounds, at a school-sponsored event, or in route to and from school. 
The Drew Central School District Board of Education, administration, and staff are committed to 
maintaining a school climate of mutual respect in which all students can learn and one which ensures the 
safety and welfare of everyone in the school environment. 
 
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
The superintendent is responsible for exercising leadership in establishing all necessary procedures, rules, 
and regulations so that the Board of Education’s policies relating to standards of student behavior will be 
effective. 
 
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PRINCIPALS 
The building principal of each school is expected to disseminate to all students at the beginning of the 
school year and to each new student(s) upon registration, the rules, and regulations currently in effect for 
that school. In developing rules and regulations, the principal is expected to involve representatives of the 
teaching staff, the student body, and the patrons of the school. 
 Each principal, or the principal’s designee, is authorized to assign students to detention and to suspend or 
recommend the expulsion of students. The principal is expected to inform the parent/guardian of any 
student whose behavior is in serious conflict with established procedures, rules, and laws. The principal 
of each school is responsible for conducting continued in-service education for all personnel on a regular 
basis to interpret and implement established policies. 
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TEACHERS 
The Drew Central School District Board of Education, acting through the Superintendent, holds all school 
employees responsible for the supervision of the behavior of students during the time the students are 
legally under the supervision of the school. The Board believes that teachers are critical to the learning 
process and further believes that teachers must have the authority necessary to manage the classroom in a 
manner that results in an effective learning climate. However, the responsibility for establishing and 
maintaining a positive school climate must be shared by all - students, teachers, administrators, support 
staff, and parents. 
Consequently, teachers, as well as all other school staff, must confront, intervene, and report 
inappropriate student behavior whenever and wherever it occurs within the school environment. This 
document serves as notification to students and parents that the Drew Central School Board authorizes 
teachers and other certified staff to use appropriate disciplinary measures to the degree necessary to 
maintain order and student control. This authority includes, but is not limited to the following: 
1. The removal of certain privileges that are normally associated with school, such as recess, field 
trips, school assemblies, and participation in classroom/building activities designed as a reward for 
appropriate behavior. 
2. The requirement of a conference with parents as a step in an overall plan of interventions. 
3. A referral to an administrator and exclusion from class when the student’s behavior is intolerable to 
the learning process and the utilization of In-School Suspensions where conditions permit. 
4. The right to file criminal charges when physically or verbally abused. 
 
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS 
 
1. Attend school daily, arrive on time, and participate fully in all classes. 
2. Obtain all the education and training necessary to become a contributing member of society. 
3. Express opinions and ideas in a respectful manner so as not to offend or slander others. 

4. Respect others rights to a distraction free learning environment which includes, but not limited to, 
such things as waiting to be called upon before speaking or staying seated unless given permission 
otherwise. 
5. Know all school rules and regulations that govern student behavior and conduct himself/herself in 
accordance with the rules and regulations. Be willing to abide by the decision reached through the 
appeal process. 
6. Meet standard of decency, safety, health, and good taste in dress and appearance. 
7. Bring needed materials/school supplies to and from school. 
8. No loitering is allowed in the hallways or restroom. 
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF PARENTS 
 
1. Provide for the physical needs of the child. 
2. Prepare the child emotionally and socially to be receptive to learning and discipline. 
3. Have the child attend school regularly and on time. 
4. Assist the child in developing proper personal and social habits. 
5. Know school requirements and procedures. 
6. Discuss problems with the appropriate persons to prevent misunderstandings. 
7. Work for the success and improvement of public education in the Drew Central School District. 
 
 
4.18 – PROHIBITED CONDUCT 
 
 
 
Students and staff require a safe and orderly learning environment that is conducive to high student 
achievement. Certain student behaviors are unacceptable in such an environment and are hereby 
prohibited by the Board. Prohibited behaviors include, but shall not be limited to the following: 
1. Disrespect for school employees and failing to comply with their reasonable directions or otherwise 
demonstrating insubordination; 
2. Disruptive behavior that interferes with orderly school operations; 
3. Willfully and intentionally assaulting or threatening to assault or physically abusing any student or 
school employee; 
4. Possession of any weapon that can reasonably be considered capable of causing bodily harm to 
another individual; 
5. Possession or use of tobacco in any form on any property owned or leased by any public school; 
6. Willfully or intentionally damaging, destroying, or stealing school property; 
7. Possession of any paging device, beeper, or similar electronic communication devices on the school 
campus during normal school hours unless specifically exempted by the administration for health or 
other compelling reasons; 
8. Possession, selling, distributing, or being under the influence of an alcoholic beverage, any illegal 
drug, unauthorized inhalants, or the inappropriate use or sharing of prescription or over the counter 
drugs, or other intoxicants, or anything represented to be a drug; 
9. Sharing, diverting, transferring, applying to others (such as needles or lancets), or in any way 
misusing medication or any medical supplies in their possession; 
10. Inappropriate public displays of affection; 
11. Cheating, copying, or claiming another person's work to be his/her own; 
12. Gambling; 
13. Inappropriate student dress; 
14. Use of vulgar, profane, or obscene language or gestures; 
15. Truancy; 
16. Excessive tardiness; 
17. Engaging in behavior designed to taunt, degrade, or ridicule another person on the basis of race, 
ethnicity, national origin, sex, or disability; 
18. Possess, view, distribute or electronically transmit sexually explicit or vulgar images or 
representations, whether electronically, on a data storage device, or in hard copy form; 
19. Hazing, or aiding in the hazing of another student; 

20. Gangs or gang-related activities, including belonging to secret societies of any kind, are forbidden on 
school property. Gang insignias, clothing, “throwing signs” or other gestures associated with gangs 
are prohibited; 
21. Sexual harassment; 
22. Bullying; and 
23. Operating a vehicle on school grounds while using a wireless communication device. 
The Board directs each school in the District to develop implementation regulations for prohibited student 
conduct consistent with applicable Board policy, State and Federal laws, and judicial decisions. 
 Cross References: Prohibited Conduct #1—Policy # 3.17 
 Prohibited Conduct #2— Policy # 4.20 
Prohibited Conduct #3— Policy # 4.21, 4.26 
 Prohibited Conduct #4— Policy # 4.22 
 Prohibited Conduct #5— Policy # 4.23 
 Prohibited Conduct #7—Policy 4.47 
 Prohibited Conduct #8— Policy # 4.24 
 Prohibited Conduct # 13— Policy # 4.25 
 Prohibited Conduct # 14— Policy # 4.21 
 Prohibited Conduct # 15— Policy # 4.7 
 Prohibited Conduct # 16 — Policy # 4.9 
 Prohibited Conduct # 17— Policy # 4.43 
 Prohibited Conduct # 19— Policy # 4.12 
 Prohibited Conduct # 20— Policy # 4.26 
 Prohibited Conduct # 21—Policy # 4.27 
 Prohibited Conduct # 22— Policy # 4.43 
 Prohibited Conduct # 23— Policy # 4.47 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-5-201 
A.C.A. § 6-15-1005 
A.C.A. § 6-18-222 
A.C.A. § 5-73-133 
A.C.A. § 6-18-502 
A.C.A. § 6-18-506 
A.C.A. § 6-18-514 
A.C.A. § 6-18-707 
A.C.A. § 6-21-609 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1602 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1603 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1609 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
 Definitions 
 
 
 
 
Abuse: Abuse means to wrong in speech, reproach coarsely, disparage, revile, or malign. Use of 
profanity or vulgar expressions directed at another person is considered abuse. 
 
Act of Violence: Any violation of Arkansas law where a person purposely or knowingly causes, 
or threatens to cause death or serious physical injury to another person. (Act 1520 of 1999) 
 
ALE: Alternative Learning Environment: A student intervention program in compliance with 
AR code: 6-18-508 and 6-18-509 that seeks to eliminate traditional barriers to student learning. 
 
Assault: The willful attempt or threat to inflict injury upon the person of another, coupled with 
apparent present ability to do so. Any display of force that would give the victim reason to fear 
bodily harm is assault, even if touching or striking does not occur. 
 
Battery: A person commits battery if he purposely makes physical contact with another person 
and causes bodily injury. Battery is a Class A misdemeanor. If the injury is to a law 
enforcement officer or a school employee, it is a Class D felony. Battery, which causes 
permanent disfigurement or disability, is a Class B felony. (A.C.A. 5-13-201-203) 
 

Bullying: The intentional harassment, intimidation, humiliation, ridicule, defamation, or threat 
or incitement of violence by a student against another student or public school employee by a 
written, verbal, electronic, or physical act that causes or creates a clear and present danger. 
 
Contraband: Any articles which are illegal or articles which a student possesses illegally. 
(Example: Things stolen from the Book Fair, drugs) 
 
Corporal Punishment: Corporal punishment as used in the schools refers to paddling a student 
for breaking a school rule. 
 
Deadly Weapon: A) A firearm or anything manifestly designed, made, or adapted for the 
purpose of inflicting death or serious injury; or B) Anything that in the manner of its use or 
intended use is capable of causing death or serious injury. (Act 1520 of 1999) 
 
Detention: Loss of a student’s free time after school. 
 
Disruptive Conduct: Behavior which includes defiant and hostile acts; acts involving moral 
turpitude; and disrespect for authority in the school buildings, on school grounds, or at school-
sponsored events. 
 
Due Process: To guarantee that a student will not have his/her rights taken away unfairly, there 
are established procedures which school personnel must follow. (For example, when suspended 
from school, the principal must notify the student and his/her parent/guardian of the reason and 
explain the appeal procedures.) 
 
Equal Educational Opportunity: The Board of Education believes that every child, regardless of 
race, creed, color, sex, cultural, or economic background, or disability, should be given the 
opportunity to develop and achieve to the maximum extent possible. To provide equal 
educational opportunity, all programs offered by school within the District will be open to all 
students. 
 
Extended Time-Out (ETO): A principal may assign ETO for a portion of the day as a 
consequence. During ETO, the student completes regular class assignments and is monitored by 
a district employee. 
 
Fighting: Any action by one or more students to another for the purpose of inflicting bodily 
harm. Fighting includes throwing punches, slapping, throwing one to the ground intentionally, 
kicking or hitting with an object or provoking a fight by name calling. 
 
Firearm: Any device designed, made, or adapted to expel a projectile by the action of an 
explosive or any device readily convertible to that use, including such a device that is not loaded 
or lacks a clip or other component to render it immediately operable, and components that can 
readily be assembled into such a device. (Act 1520 of 1999) 
 
Expulsion: Principals may recommend to the Superintendent that a student be prohibited from 
entering the school or school grounds until the end of the year, or permanently, depending upon 
the severity of the offense. Expulsion must be approved by the Board of Education. 
 

In-School Suspension (ISS): Rather than suspending students from the school campus for 
infractions of rules, a principal may assign students to In-School Suspension. During ISS, the 
student completes regular class assignments and is monitored by a district employee. 
While in ISS, a student may not participate in or attend any school activities involving Drew 
Central Schools at home or away. If a student attempts to do so, he/she will be asked to leave 
and will be assigned one extra day of ISS. 
 
Insubordination: The term is used to describe a state of being disobedient, resistant to authority, 
or unwilling to follow directions. 
 
Parent: Refers to the person or persons who, by blood relationship or through custody or 
guardianship proceedings, have control or charge of any student in attendance in District schools 
until age 18 or independent status is attained. 
 
Probation: School personnel may suspend punishment for a rule violation and notify the parent 
and student in writing, at a parent conference that the student must obey the rules for the 
remainder of the year under penalty of recommendation for expulsion. 
 
Reasonable Force: School personnel may apply the minimum amount of force necessary to stop 
or restrain a student form conducting himself/herself in such a way that could result in physical 
injury to himself/herself or to others. 
 
Reasonable Suspicion: School personnel who have reason to believe that a search will produce 
evidence that a student has violated or is violating the school rules or the law may conduct a 
search. 
 
Rights and Responsibilities: Students, as well as parents and school personnel, are guaranteed 
full rights of citizenship by the United States Constitution; and those rights cannot be denied 
except through due process of law. In order for others to enjoy citizenship rights, it is necessary 
for students to behave in such a way that others are treated equally and with respect. 
 
Suspension: The principal may prohibit a student from entering the school or school grounds for 
a period of time set by the principal or superintendent. Suspensions will be no longer than ten 
school days, including the day on which the violation occurred, unless it is meant to be 
determined by the Board of Education. 
Even though credit for daily work will not be allowed, makeup work may be permitted for 
exams. Students who accumulate 15 total days or four assignments of suspension may be 
expelled for the remainder of the semester. 
 
Terroristic Threatening: (Act 1046 of 2001) Threatening to cause death, serious injury, or 
substantial property damage with the intent to scare or intensely frighten another person. This 
offence is a Class D felony, unless the threat is to merely cause physical harm or property 
damage; which is a class A misdemeanor. If a threat that would otherwise be a Class A 
misdemeanor is made to a school employee, then it is a Class D felony. 
 
Truancy: If students do not attend class and have no bona fide permission to be absent from 
class, they will be considered truant from class. 
 
Writing Skills: Writing Skills can be used for a variety of writing tasks and assignments. 
Students learn the concepts of organization, topic sentences, transitions, and conclusions. They 

are in the process of becoming independent writers and learn to make good decisions about the 
examples and explanations they include in their paragraphs. 
 
*General Rules* 
THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS ARE DESIGNED TO PROTECT ALL MEMBERS OF THE EDUCATIONAL 
COMMUNITY IN THE EXERCISE OF THEIR RIGHTS AND DUTIES 
STUDENTS MUST OBEY THE REASONABLE INSTRUCTIONS 
OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES. 
 
1.Freedom of Publication and Distribution: Students are entitled to publish and distribute 
materials, provided that the students assume the responsibility for the contents. They are 
responsible for cleaning up any litter that may result. (ACT 1109) 
 
2. Freedom of Speech and Assembly: 
Students are entitled to verbal expressions of their personal opinions as long as the rights of 
others are not violated and the expression does not cause disruption of the educational process. 
Students are allowed to assemble peaceably. To avoid disruption of the educational 
process all student meetings must function as a part of the educational process or as authorized 
by the principal. Meetings that interfere with the operation of the school are prohibited. 
Demonstrations and disorderly activities on the part of the students at any time on school 
grounds will not be tolerated. Participation in such demonstration activities, no matter how well 
intended, shall bring suspension. 
 
3.Identification Requirements: Upon request, all persons must identify themselves to school 
employees. 
 
4. Immorality 
A student will abstain from indecent and immoral acts. (Act 1150 of 1999) 
 
5. Off Campus Events: Students at school-sponsored events shall be governed by school district 
rules, regulations, and personnel. Violation of the rules or refusal to obey reasonable instructions 
of school personnel may result in the loss of privilege to attend the events and may result in 
disciplinary action applicable under the regular school program. 
 
6.Students Sick During Recess 
Students may not stay inside during recess unless they are sick. 
If you wish for your child to stay in at recess due to sickness, write a note stating the nature of 
the illness. Unless a note is sent, the child will be sent outside to play when weather permits. 
 
7 .Personal Search: Personal searches are discouraged, however, in the event that there is reason 
to believe that a student has stolen property, contraband, or a weapon on his/her person, a 
personal search by a faculty member of the same sex is authorized. By law, school officials need 
not obtain a warrant before searching a student who is under their authority. The search of a 
student by a school official will be justified where there is reasonable suspicion that the search 
will turn up evidence that the student has violated the law or rules of the school and is reasonably 
related to the objective of the search and not excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of 
the students and the nature of the infraction. 
 
 

 The following guidelines will be followed: 
A. A student will be asked to empty his/her pockets and possibly remove his/her shoes 
and socks. 
B. A pat down search of a student shall be done by a school official of the same sex. 
C. An adult witness shall be present when a personal search is conducted. 
 
8.Reasonable Force: Drew Central authorizes the use of reasonable force by any certified 
employee in the exercise of lawful authority to restrain a student, to protect a student from harm, 
or to maintain order at any school-sponsored event. 
 
9.Search and Seizure: School personnel may legally search desks, backpacks, and students 
 The following guidelines will be followed: 
1. A search shall be conducted upon receipt of information that the search would produce 
evidence indicating the student has violated the law or school rules. 
2. Students should be so informed that school authorities have equal access to backpacks 
and/or desks and may inspect them at any time. 
3. Items that may be reasonably determined to be a threat to the safety to others, or that are 
used to disrupt the educational process, may be removed from the student’s possession. 
 
10.Selling Personal Items at School 
There will be no buying, selling, or trading of personal items at school. Students should be 
encouraged not to share personal items such as chap stick, brushes or drinks. 
 
11. Valentine’s Day Holiday 
No “special” deliveries are accepted at school during the week of Valentine’s Day. 
 
 
DISCIPLINE POLICY STATEMENT 
A student shall comply with reasonable directions or commands of teachers, student teachers, 
teacher aides, principals, administrative personnel, superintendents, school bus drivers, school 
security officers or other authorized school personnel. Students are expected to treat teachers 
and fellow students with respect and courtesy. Horseplay and physical teasing as well as 
shoving, striking, fighting, or threatening others constitute battery and/or assault and are 
forbidden. All threats of violence, bullying or property damage will be taken seriously. Students 
should be aware that uttering or writing threatening remarks can not only lead to disciplinary 
action but may also lead to criminal penalties. Violations of the Discipline Policy could result in 
the minimum punishment of a reprimand or as much as the maximum disciplinary action of 
recommendation of expulsion from school. Further, by law, local law enforcement must be 
notified whenever an act of violence is committed on school property. 
 
CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 
Drew Central Middle School will operate fully within the frame work of the following Code of 
Student Conduct. 
 
. Class Conduct - Each classroom teacher will establish rules to govern the behavior 
within his/her individual classroom. Your child’s teacher will provide you with his/her 
individual rules. 
 
. Transition Conduct - All students will be quiet and orderly when in the hallway. 
Students are not to roam the hallways during lunch period. 

 
. Cafeteria Conduct - Eating in the cafeteria should be a pleasant experience for students. 
Students are expected to enter and exit quietly and orderly, and to keep their space clean. 
Talking at a soft level will be permitted. However, if the noise level exceeds the 
acceptable level, duty teachers may request silence until orderly conduct is resumed. 
Students must ask permission before leaving his/her seat. Students playing with their 
food, throwing food , yelling, fighting, etc. will be considered inappropriate behavior and 
will result in disciplinary action such as clean-up time, D-Hall, In-School Suspension, or 
corporal punishment based on the severity of the infraction and the number of times the 
student has exhibited the unacceptable behavior. 
 
. Food Policy- Students are not allowed to eat in the classroom after breakfast except on 
designated snack days. 
 
. Outside Conduct and Rules - Each grade will play in his/her assigned areas. To ensure 
safety for all students, all playground equipment must be used correctly. No tackle 
football, skateboarding, wrestling or Karate type activities are allowed. All students are to 
begin lining up immediately after the bell rings. Students choosing to play after the recess 
bell rings or failing to line up properly will be penalized one recess. 
 
. School Rules - Keep hands, feet and unkind comments to yourself. Respect others, no 
bullying, respect school and personal property. CD players, game boys, Pokémon or Yu-
gi-oh cards, skateboards, MP 3 players, IPODS, roller skate shoes (heelies) and other toys 
will be left at home. No Sunflower Seeds or drinks that are red in color are allowed 
at school. Students are allowed to bring bottled water to drink while in the classroom but 
it must be in the original container or a clear container with no additives. 
 
Office Referrals 
Drew Central Middle School students will go through the handbook and policies with their 
homeroom teachers so that they understand the expectations set before them. Teachers will 
utilize their professional development training to create a warm, welcoming, safe, and inviting 
environment in which students can learn and be successful. All attempts will be made to engage 
a student so that distractions and misconduct will be kept to a minimum. However, if the 
learning environment is not conducive to learning, teachers will use the following guidelines 
when correcting inappropriate behavior: 
 
. Upon the first infraction of school rules, a demerit will be given and documented 
by the teacher including the infraction and the date. 
. On the second infraction of school rules, a second demerit will be given and 
parents will be contacted by the teacher. Parent contact will be made by email, 
phone call, text message, or regular mail. Parents are strongly encouraged to 
correct the behavior from home. If the student’s behavior is corrected and 
learning can continue, no other school action will be taken. The administration 
reserves all rights to issue discipline depending on the severity of the 
infraction. 
. If a third demerit occurs detention hall, or ISS (depending upon the severity), 
will be assigned. The teacher will also keep up with the date, type of infraction, 
and method used to contact the parents. 

. If a fourth demerit or subsequent demerit is given ISS will be assigned. Each 
subsequent punishment will build upon previous occurring consequences. The 
teacher will also keep up with the date, type of infraction, and method used to 
contact the parent. 
Each subsequent punishment will build upon previous occurring consequences. 
 
CHRONIC DISCIPLINE POLICY 
A student who is disruptive in the instructional and/or non/instructional area and hindering the other 
student’s right to be educated on a regular basis shall be considered a chronic discipline problem. This 
student may be removed from the classroom by the teacher. (Act 1281) Disciplinary procedures will 
follow set policies for chronic behavior problems. 
. If the same student is removed from class twice in a nine week period, a conference must be held 
with the following attendees: 
Principal or Designee, the Teacher, Counselor, Parent/Guardians/or persons in loco parentis, and 
the student, if appropriate. 
. Failure of the parent or guardian to attend does not prevent the conference from being held or 
action being taken. 
The instructional area would include the regular classroom, activity and ancillary classes such as Special 
Education, ESL class, Gifted and Talented, Music, P.E., Computer Lab, Art and Library. 
The non-instructional area would include the playground, cafeteria, in school vehicles, on school buses, at 
designated school bus stops, at school sponsored activities, at school sanctioned events, or other school 
property. 
 
DETENTION HALL 
 
 
 
 
 Detention is the loss of a student’s free time before school. 
. Detention will be held in the Middle School Library before school 
. Parents/guardians are responsible for providing transportation to morning d-hall. The bus will 
NOT provide transportation to detention hall. 
. Siblings of students assigned detention hall are not allowed to be dropped off at the library with 
the student that is serving the assigned detention hall. 
. Students who have been assigned detention should report to Mrs. Gardner in the library between 
6:55 and 7:00 a.m. 
. Any student that is late to detention or misses an assigned detention will serve an extra day. 
. Any student that does not cooperate with Mrs. Gardner (or her substitute) will be assigned extra 
day(s). 
. Parents/Guardians will be notified of their student’s detention assignment. 
. Students will not be excused from detention for extracurricular activities, appointments, etc. 
. If the student is absent from school on the day his/her detention is due, unless a professional 
excuse is provided to verify the absence, the student will be assigned to ISS. 
. A student may substitute only 1 detention hall for corporal punishment per semester. 
. After 5 detention hall assignments, In School Suspension will be assigned upon the next 
infraction. 
. Detention Hall accumulations will start over at semester. 
 
 
 
ALE – ALTERNATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 
 
 
 
 
 
 A student intervention program in compliance with AR Code 6-18-508 and 6-18-509 that seeks to 
eliminate traditional barriers to student learning. The Drew Central/Monticello ALE facility is located at 
the City Park facility in Monticello. The Placement Team for ALE will include the school counselor, 

Principal, Parent or Legal Guardian and the regular classroom teacher. Any student coming to Drew 
Central from a Residential Facility will go to ALE for 20 days. 
Criteria for ALE placement: 
Students placed in ALE, though capable, typically manifest one or more of the following: 
- Academic problems - Disruptive behavior 
- Dropped out of school - Recurring absenteeism 
- Personal/family situation - Abuse 
- Frequency of relocation - Estrangement/removed from home 
- Inadequate emotional support - Mental/physical health problems 
- Pregnancy - Coming from a Residential Facility 
- Other 
 
ARSON 
The willful and deliberate burning of, or attempting to burn, school property is prohibited. 
Parents/Guardians and The Monticello Police Department will be immediately notified, and violator(s) 
will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. (Arkansas Code 6-18-502) 
 A person commits the offense of reckless burning if the person purposely starts a fire or 
 causes an explosion, whether on his or her own property or property of another person, 
 and thereby recklessly: 
(1) Creates a substantial risk of death or serious physical injury to any person; 
(2) Destroys or causes substantial damage to an occupiable structure of another person; or 
(3) Destroys or causes substantial damage to a vital public facility. 
(4) Reckless burning is a Class D felony. (Arkansas Code 5-38-302) 
 
First Offense: 
. Two weeks (10 school days) Out of School Suspension. 
. The parent/guardian will, at their expense provide a psychological examination, by a state-
licensed psychological examiner, to determine if the student is a threat to himself or to others. 
. Proof of a psychological examination must be furnished to the office. 
. If the psychological examination determines that the student is a threat to himself or others, then 
a conference will be held with the parents and school administration to determine the best 
academic plan for the student. 
 
Second Offense: Suspension for remainder of the current school year. Student(s) will be assigned 
to the Alternative Learning Environment (ALE) campus. 
 
 
FIREWORKS 
A student shall not possess, handle or store firecrackers, smoke bombs, cherry bombs or any other kind of 
fireworks that reasonably could be a danger to himself/herself or to other students, that could cause 
damage to school property or that could be disruptive to the learning climate of the school. 
 
GAMBLING 
A student shall not participate in any activity which may be termed gambling or wagering where the 
stakes are any other object or objects of value. 
 
 PUBLIC DISPLAYS OF AFFECTION 
Students are to refrain from kissing, sitting in laps, or intimate hugging and touching while at school or 
school sponsored activities. 
Violation of this policy will result in the following: 
1st offense: Warning 
2nd offense: Detention Hall Assignment 
3rd offense: In School Suspension Assignment and Mandatory Parent Conference. 

 
RACIAL OR ETHNIC SLURS 
Students who are guilty of racial slurs, ethnic obscenities, or other derogatory remarks 
will be disciplined as outlined below: 
First Offense: Parents will be notified. A Conference will be held with both parents of the victim 
and the accused with the intent to accomplish communication and for it to be made known this 
behavior is unacceptable. 
 Punishment - 3 days In-School Suspension 
Second Offense: Constitutes continual and total disregard for Drew Central policy and will be dealt 
with accordingly. Re-notification of parents: Parents should be made aware they are responsible for 
their children. 
 Punishment - 3 day Out of School Suspension. 
Third Offense: Suspension with recommendation for expulsion 
 
THEFT 
A student shall not steal or attempt to steal property belonging to the school or public or private property 
while under jurisdiction of the school. Parent/Guardian contact will be made, the student shall make 
restitution of any property stolen by them and shall be subject to regular disciplinary measures from a 
warning to suspension. (Act 706 of 1997) 
 
TRUANCY 
Students who are on campus or come to campus must attend classes or be authorized to be excused from 
attending classes. If students do not attend class and have no bona fide permission to be absent from class, 
they will be considered truant from class. The administration will investigate all charges of truancy. 
Students who are adjudged to be truant following administration investigation will be assigned to In 
School Suspension and the Intake Officer will be contacted. Only the principal has the authority to assign 
students to In School Suspension. 
 
Truancy Discipline Procedures: 
First Offense – Parent Notification, Intake Office Contacted and 3 days In School Suspension 
Assignment 
Second Offense – Parent Notification, Family in Need of Services (FINS) filed and 5 days In School 
Suspension 
 
 BEHAVIOR NOT COVERED 
 
 
 
 
The school district reserves the right to punish behavior which is not conducive to good order and 
discipline in the schools, even though such behavior is not specified in the preceding written rules. 
Parents of students may be liable for damages to school property caused by the students. 
 
 
TERRORISTIC THREATENING (A.C.A.5-13-301) 
 
 
 
Communicating a Death Threat whether orally, written, or any display of violent behavior perceived, 
overt or intentional (see pg. 21) ...Act 1046 of 2001 
Threatening to cause death, serious injury, or substantial property damage with the intent to scare or 
intensely frighten another person constitutes Terroristic Threatening. This offense is a Class D felony, 
unless the threat is to merely cause physical harm or property damage; which is a class A misdemeanor. 
If a threat that would otherwise be a Class A misdemeanor is made to a school employee, then it is a Class 
D felony. 
Any student who communicates a death threat oral or written, including cyber bullying, under this policy 
will be subject to the following procedures: 

First Offense: Parent/guardian conference with an administrator and teacher. Depending on the severity, 
appropriate law enforcement will be contacted. There will be a joint decision with the parent/guardian as 
to one of the following options: 
 A. Corporal Punishment D. Psychological Evaluation 
 B. In-School-Suspension E. Detention/DYS (Dept. of Youth Services) 
 C. Out of school suspension 
 
 Second Offense: The parent/guardian will, at their expense provide a psychological examination, by a 
state-licensed psychological examiner, to determine if the student is a threat to himself or to others. 
Additionally, the student will be suspended a minimum of five days. 
 If the psychological examination determines that the student is a threat to himself or others, then a 
conference will be held with the parents and school administration to determine the best academic plan 
for the student. 
 
 
INSULT OR ABUSE OF A TEACHER - (A.C.A. 6-17-106) 
 
 
 
 
It is unlawful for any person to abuse or insult, verbally or physically, a public school teacher while that 
teacher is performing school responsibilities. Engaging in such conduct constitutes a misdemeanor and is 
punishable by a fine of not less than $100 or more than $1,500. The student(s) will also be suspended for 
up to ten (10) days. School districts are required to report any prosecutions under this section to the 
Department of Education. 
A student shall not cause or attempt to cause physical injury to a school employee, fellow student or any 
other individual. A student, who intentionally or knowingly causes physical injury to a teacher or other 
school employee, while that employee or teacher is acting in the course of employment, has committed 
second degree battery and Local Law Officials will be contacted. Second degree battery is a Class D 
felony. (Act 207 of 1997) 
 
 
4.19 – CONDUCT TO & FROM SCHOOL & TRANSPORTATION ELIGIBILITY 
 
 
 
 
Students are subject to the same rules of conduct while traveling to and from school as they are while on school 
grounds. Appropriate disciplinary actions may be taken against commuting students who violate student code of 
conduct rules. 
 
The preceding paragraph also applies to student conduct while on school buses. Students shall be instructed in safe 
riding practices. The driver of a school bus shall not operate the school bus until every passenger is seated. 
Disciplinary measures for problems related to bus behavior shall include suspension or expulsion from school, or 
suspending or terminating the student’s bus transportation privileges. Transporting students to and from school who 
have lost their bus transportation privileges shall become the responsibility of the student’s parent or legal guardian. 
 
Students are eligible to receive district bus transportation if they reside in the Drew Central School District. The 
district is not responsible for bus transportation to and from school for those students attending the district under 
freedom of choice and not residing in the Drew Central School District. 
 
These are the guidelines that will be followed in complying with Federal Highway Safety Standard 
#17 in the Drew Central Public Schools: 
1. The driver of the school bus is responsible for the safety of all students riding the bus. He or 
she has the same responsibility as the teacher in controlling discipline. 
2. Your child should know his/her bus number or symbol, location of the bus stop and the 
driver’s name. Please help teach your child this information. 
3. The first duty of the passenger is to obey the driver’s directions promptly. 

4. Be at the bus stop five (5) minutes before regular pickup time. Stand back 10 feet from the 
bus stop and wait until the door is opened before moving closer to the bus. Do not play in the 
highway. 
5. Students are to be ready to get on the bus when it stops. Do not expect the driver to wait for 
your child to come out of the house. 
6. State laws require that students be assigned seats. They are to sit in their designated seats and 
remain seated while the bus is in motion, with the aisles clear. 
7. While loading or unloading, enter or leave the bus orderly and quickly. 
8. Students must get off at their regular bus stop unless a written statement from the child’s 
parent/guardian which has been previously approved and signed by the principal and is given 
to the driver indicating a different bus stop. 
9. Students who must cross the road after leaving the bus in the afternoon must go to a point on 
the shoulder of the road ten feet in front of the bus. Students should cross the road only after 
the bus driver has signaled them to do so. Students should cross the road before the bus 
leaves. 
10. The bus driver shall not leave the stop until everyone has crossed the road, unless a student or 
students refuse to cross, at which time the driver may continue the route after waiting a 
reasonable length of time when it is determined the student or students will not cross. A 
written conduct report will be given to the principal the following school day. 
11. No food or drink will be consumed on the bus. 
12. No obscene words, gestures, or signs will be permitted on the bus. 
13. Students are not to tamper with any safety devices such as door latches, first-aid kits, fire 
extinguishers, emergency flares, etc. 
14. Students are not to put their hands, arms, heads, bodies, or other objects out of the window of 
the bus. 
15. The use or distribution of any form of tobacco or any controlled substance will not be 
permitted on any school bus. 
16. Excessive noises of any kind will not be tolerated. No radios, tape players, CD players or any 
other noise making device will not be played while on the bus. 
17. Students are not to write on the bus or damage the seats. 
18. No fire arms, knives, or sharp object(s) of any kind are allowed on the school bus. Including 
“toy” weapons. 
19. Pets or other living animals will not be allowed on the bus. 
20. No objects may be thrown on the bus or out of the bus windows. 
21. Fighting, scuffling, or physical play activities will not be permitted on the bus. 
 
BUS DISCIPLINE 
o First Offense – Parent notification and a written warning. 
o Second Offense – Parent notification by phone or mail; may include the bus supervisor and/or 
driver and detention hall. 
o Third Offense – Parent notification by mail and three (3) days bus suspension 
o Fourth Offense – Parent notification by mail and five (5) days bus suspension 
o Fifth Offense – Parent notification by mail and thirty (30) days bus suspension 
o Sixth Offense – Parent notification and bus expulsion for the remainder of the school year 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-19-119 (b) 
Ark. Division of Academic Facilities and Transportation Rules Governing Maintenance and Operations of Ark. 
Public School Buses and Physical Examinations of School Bus Drivers 4.0 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 08/10/2006 
 
 
4.20 – DISRUPTION OF SCHOOL 
 
 
 
No student shall by the use of violence, force, noise, coercion, threat, intimidation, fear, passive resistance, or any 
other conduct, intentionally cause the disruption of any lawful mission, process, or function of the school, or engage 

in any such conduct for the purpose of causing disruption or obstruction of any lawful mission, process, or function. 
Nor shall any student encourage any other student to engage in such activities. 
 
Disorderly activities by any student or group of students that adversely affect the school’s orderly educational 
environment shall not be tolerated at any time on school grounds. Teachers may remove from class and send to the 
principal or principal’s designee office a student whose behavior is so unruly, disruptive, or abusive that it seriously 
interferes with the teacher’s ability to teach the students, the class, or with the ability of the student’s classmates to 
learn. Students who refuse to leave the classroom voluntarily will be escorted from the classroom by the school 
administration. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-511 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 
 
4.21 – STUDENT ASSAULT OR BATTERY 
 
 
 
 
A student shall not threaten, physically abuse, or attempt to physically abuse, or behave in such a way as to be 
perceived to threaten bodily harm to any other person (student, school employee, or school visitor). Any gestures, 
vulgar, abusive or insulting language, taunting, threatening, harassing, or intimidating remarks by a student toward 
another person that threatens their well-being is strictly forbidden. This includes, but is not limited to, fighting, racial, 
ethnic, religious, or sexual slurs. 
 
Furthermore, it is unlawful, during regular school hours, and in a place where a public school employee is required 
to be in the course of his or her duties, for any person to address a public school employee using language which, in 
its common understanding, is calculated to: a) cause a breach of the peace; b) materially and substantially interfere 
with the operation of the school; c) arouse the person to whom it is addressed to anger, to the extent likely to cause 
imminent retaliation. Students guilty of such an offense may be subject to legal proceedings in addition to student 
disciplinary measures. 
 
The principal will have discretion in administering the consequences for the student’s conduct, depending 
on the severity of the situation. Consequences may include one or more of the following: 
1. Warning – counseled by principal 
2. Parent Conference – to include teacher, counselor, and parents 
3. ISS (In School Suspension) 
4. Mental Health Recommendation (Day Springs, Living Hope, or Delta Counseling) 
5. OSS (Out of School Suspension) 
6. Expulsion 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-17-106 (a) 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 
 
 
FIGHTING 
 
 
Due to the incidence of fighting the following procedures will be taken when it is determined 
that fighting or other disruptive behaviors require disciplinary actions. Students will 
conference with the administrator and parents will be notified by phone or mail. Counseling 
sessions will be scheduled with school counselor. 
First Offense: In School Suspension Administrator will make the decision on the number of 
days based on the severity of the infraction(s), parents will be contacted. 
Second or Subsequent Offenses: Out of School Suspension Administrator will make the 
decision on the number of days based on the severity of the infraction(s), parents will be 
contacted. 
 
 
 

 
4.22—WEAPONS AND DANGEROUS INSTRUMENTS 
 
 
 
 
No student shall possess a weapon, display what appears to be a weapon, or threaten to use a weapon 
while in school, on or about school property, before or after school, in attendance at school or any school 
sponsored activity, en route to or from school or any school sponsored activity, off the school grounds at 
any school bus stop, or at any school sponsored activity or event. Military personnel, such as ROTC 
cadets, acting in the course of their official duties are exempted. 
 
A weapon is defined as any firearm; knife; razor; ice pick; dirk; box cutter; nun-chucks; pepper spray, 
mace, or other noxious spray; explosive; Taser or other instrument that uses electrical current to cause 
neuromuscular incapacitation; or any other instrument or substance capable of causing bodily harm. For 
the purposes of this policy, "firearm" means any device designed, made, or adapted to expel a projectile 
by the action of an explosive or any device readily convertible to that use. 
 
Possession means having a weapon, as defined in this policy, on the student’s body or in an area under 
his/her control. If a student discovers prior to any questioning or search by any school personnel that 
he/she has accidentally brought a weapon, other than a firearm, to school on his/her person, in a book 
bag/purse, or in his/her vehicle on school grounds, and the student informs the principal or a staff person 
immediately, the student will not be considered to be in possession of a weapon unless it is a firearm. The 
weapon shall be confiscated and held in the office until such time as the student’s parent/legal guardian 
shall pick up the weapon from the school’s office. Repeated offenses are unacceptable and shall be 
grounds for disciplinary action against the student as otherwise provided for in this policy. 
 
Except as permitted in this policy, students found to be in possession on the school campus of a firearm 
shall be recommended for expulsion for a period of not less than one year. The superintendent shall have 
the discretion to modify such expulsion recommendation for a student on a case-by-case basis. Parents or 
legal guardians of students expelled under this policy shall be given a copy of the current laws regarding 
the possibility of parental responsibility for allowing a child to possess a firearm on school property. 
Parents or legal guardians shall sign a statement acknowledging that they have read and understand said 
laws prior to readmitting the student. Parents or legal guardians of a student enrolling from another school 
after the expiration of an expulsion period for a firearm policy violation shall also be given a copy of the 
current laws regarding the possibility of parental responsibility for allowing a child to possess a firearm 
on school property. The parents or legal guardians shall sign a statement acknowledging that they have 
read and understand said laws prior to the student being enrolled in school. 
 
The mandatory expulsion requirement for possession of a firearm does not apply to a firearm brought to 
school for the purpose of participating in activities approved and authorized by the district that include the 
use of firearms. Such activities may include ROTC programs, hunting safety or military education, or 
before or after-school hunting or rifle clubs. Firearms brought to school for such purposes shall be 
brought to the school employee designated to receive such firearms. The designated employee shall store 
the firearms in a secure location until they are removed for use in the approved activity. 
 
The district shall report any student who brings a firearm to school to the criminal justice system or 
juvenile delinquency system by notifying local law enforcement. 
Cross Reference: Policy 4.31—EXPULSION 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-502 (c) (2)(A)(B) 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-507 (e) (1)(2) 
 A.C.A. § 6-21-608 
 A.C.A. § 5-4-201 
 A.C.A. § 5-4-401 
 A.C.A. § 5-27-210 
A.C.A. § 5-73-119(b)(e)(8)(9)(10) 
 20 USC § 7151 
Date Adopted: December 10, 2005 Last Revised: January 2016 
 

 
4.23—TOBACCO AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS 
 
 
 
 
 
Smoking or use of tobacco or products containing tobacco in any form (including, but not limited to, 
cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco, and snuff) in or on any real property owned or leased by a District 
school, including school buses owned or leased by the District, is prohibited. Students who violate this 
policy may be subject to legal proceedings in addition to student disciplinary measures. 
 
With the exception of recognized tobacco cessation products, this policy’s prohibition includes any 
tobacco or nicotine delivery system or product. Specifically, the prohibition includes any product that is 
manufactured, distributed, marketed, or sold as e-cigarettes, e-cigars, e-pips, or under any other name or 
descriptor. 
First Offense: Parent conference and three days In-School Suspension 
Second Offense: Parent choice: three hours (after school) of campus beautification or three days 
 of OSS (Out of School Suspension) 
Third Offense: Parent choice: five hours (after school) of campus beautification or five days 
 of OSS 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-21-609 
Date Adopted: 12/10/2005 
Last Revised: 6/30/2013 
 
4.24 – DRUGS AND ALCOHOL 
 
 
 
 
An orderly and safe school environment that is conducive to promoting student achievement requires a student 
population free from the deleterious effects of alcohol and drugs. Their use is illegal, disruptive to the educational 
environment, and diminishes the capacity of students to learn and function properly in our schools. 
 
Therefore, no student in the Drew Central School District shall possess, attempt to possess, consume, use, distribute, 
sell, buy, attempt to sell, attempt to buy, give to any person, or be under the influence of any substance as defined in 
this policy, or what the student represents or believes to be any substance as defined in this policy. This policy 
applies to any student who; is on or about school property; is in attendance at school or any school sponsored 
activity; has left the school campus for any reason and returns to the campus; is en route to or from school or any 
school sponsored activity. 
 
Prohibited substances shall include, but are not limited to, alcohol, or any alcoholic beverage, inhalants or any 
ingestible matter that alter a student’s ability to act, think, or respond, LSD, or any other hallucinogen, marijuana, 
cocaine, heroin, or any other narcotic drug, PCP, amphetamines, steroids, “designer drugs,” look-alike drugs, or any 
controlled substance. 
 
Selling, distributing, or attempting to sell or distribute, or using over-the-counter or prescription drugs not in 
accordance with the recommended dosage is prohibited. 
1. First Offense: Two weeks (10 days) of Out of School Suspension. Also, students must be enrolled 
in a drug program at the parent’s expense. Parents must provide transportation to and from the 
intervention program. Proof of attendance must be furnished to the office. 
2. Second Offense: Three weeks Out of School Suspension. 
3. Third Offense: Out of School Suspension for the remainder of semester. 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/14/2012 
 
 
4.25 – STUDENT DRESS & GROOMING 
 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School District recognizes that dress can be a matter of personal taste and 
preference. At the same time, the District has a responsibility to promote an environment 

conducive to student learning. This requires limitations to student dress and grooming that could 
be disruptive to the education process because they are immodest, disruptive, unsanitary, and 
unsafe, could cause property damage, or are offensive to common standards of decency. Student 
dress codes for the District’s schools shall be included in the student handbooks and will be 
consistent with criteria. 
House Bill 1936 approved on 3/30/2011 states that school districts are required to prohibit the 
wearing of clothing that exposes underwear, buttocks, or the breast of a female. 
 Dress Code 
. Students are expected to dress in clothing which is appropriate for school, and which will 
not distract from the learning atmosphere of the classroom. Any extreme in appearance 
that may disrupt the normal operations of the school will not be acceptable. 
. Students should practice good dress and grooming habits that are clean and sanitary. 
Guidelines for School Apparel: 
 
1. Shorts, skirts or dresses should be no shorter than four inches from the top of 
the knee. 
2. Pants, shorts or skirts with rips, tears, or holes will be allowed if there is no skin 
or undergarments showing. The rips, tears, or holes cannot be higher than 
fingertip length and must have material under them such as patches, leggings etc., 
so skin and undergarments are not showing. 
3. Clothing resembling sleep wear such as pajamas, house shoes, slippers, etc. is 
prohibited. 
4. Pants or slacks should be worn at the natural waistline. “NO SAGGING 
ALLOWED” 
5. Clothing worn over leggings or spandex should meet proper dress code 
requirements and shirts worn over leggings should meet student’s fingertip length. 
6. Clothing should not be transparent or see through. Any see-through, mesh/lace, 
low-cut, or extremely tight clothing which makes underclothing (that does not 
meet dress code) or leggings visible will be prohibited. 
7. Students must wear proper undergarments. 
8. Tops must have at least two inch wide straps over the shoulder, no sagging 
armholes, and a body length which will cover the waist. Shirts must be long 
enough to tuck in so that the midriff will not be exposed. Tanks tops, muscle 
shirts, sleeveless shirts (males), spaghetti straps, or basketball type jerseys shall 
not be worn unless a shirt with sleeves is worn over or underneath the top. Low-
cut attire, bare backs, racer back tops, halter tops, mesh/lace attire (without 
undergarment meeting dress code), or shirts, tops or blouses with open sides are 
prohibited. 
9. Exposure of cleavage is not acceptable. 
10. Shoes must be worn at all times (no house shoes or slippers). No skate shoes, 
heelies or cleats are allowed in the building. 
11. All clothing must be properly worn. (snaps should be snapped, buckles buckled, 
buttons buttoned, zippers zipped, etc) This includes straps designed to be worn 
over the shoulder (i.e. jumpers, etc.) 
12. Inappropriate symbols will not be allowed. Clothing or items (i.e. backpacks, 
jewelry, purses, bags, buttons, caps, etc) displaying symbols, slogans, pictures or 
suggestions that are of a vulgar nature, depicting alcoholic beverages, bars, 
taverns, pornography, illegal drugs, use of suggestive or inflammatory words or 
gang insignias should not be worn or carried. No inappropriate writing may be 
visible on the backside of pants, shorts or skirts. 

13. No hats, bandanas, head scarves, hoods, sunglasses or wave caps shall be allowed 
to be worn in any school building by either boys or girls. Those items worn 
inside any building will be taken and kept by the principal or her designee. 
(EXCEPTION: On Fridays, students and faculty members may pay $1.00 to wear 
a cap or hat as a part of a fundraiser. All participants must have a sticker proving 
that they have purchased this privilege.) 
14. No fishing lures or harmful objects that cause safety problems are allowed to be 
attached to the hats on Friday. 
15. No headbands or sweatbands are to be worn over the ears during class or 
academic time in the building. 
16. Any athletic attire worn by students in the classroom or any academic setting, 
including but not limited to, basketball, football, cheerleading, cross 
country/track, baseball, etc. will be required to meet proper dress code. 
Violation of the Student Dress and Grooming Code Policy will result in: 
First Offense: Verbal warning and a demerit from their teacher, call parents to bring 
clothes or send home to change. Students waiting for proper clothing will be allowed to 
return to class while waiting or may be placed into In-School Suspension until clothing is 
brought depending upon the severity of the infraction. 
Second Offense: Written warning, call parent to bring appropriate clothes or send home 
to change. Students waiting for proper clothing will be allowed to return to class while 
waiting or may be placed into In-School Suspension until clothing is brought depending 
upon the severity of the infraction 
Third Offense: One day of In School Suspension, call parent to bring appropriate clothes 
or send home to change. Students waiting for proper clothing will be allowed to return to 
class while waiting or may be placed into In-School Suspension until clothing is brought 
depending upon the severity of the infraction 
Fourth Offense: Three days of In School Suspension. Students waiting for proper 
clothing will be allowed to return to class while waiting or may be placed into In-School 
Suspension until clothing is brought depending upon the severity of the infraction. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-502(c) (1) 
A.C.A. § 6-18-503(c) 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/30/2011 
 
 
4.26 – GANGS AND GANG ACTIVITY 
 
 
 
The Board is committed to ensuring a safe school environment conducive to promoting a learning environment 
where students and staff can excel. An orderly environment cannot exist where unlawful acts occur causing fear, 
intimidation, or physical harm to students or school staff. Gangs and their activities create such an atmosphere and 
shall not be allowed on school grounds or at school functions. 
 
The following actions are prohibited by students on school property or at school functions: 
1. Wearing or possessing any clothing, bandanas, jewelry, symbol, or other sign associated with membership 
in, or representative of, any gang; 
2. Engaging in any verbal or nonverbal act such as throwing signs, gestures, or handshakes representative of 
membership in any gang; 
3. Recruiting, soliciting, or encouraging any person through duress or intimidation to become or remain a 
member of any gang; and/or 
4. Extorting payment from any individual in return for protection from harm from any gang. 
 
Students found to be in violation of this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion. 
Students arrested for gang related activities occurring off school grounds shall be subject to the same disciplinary 
actions as if they had occurred on school grounds. 

 
The principal will have discretion in administering the consequences for the student’s conduct, depending 
on the severity of the situation. Consequences may include one or more of the following: 
1. Warning – counseled by principal 
2. Parent Conference – to include teacher, counselor, and parents 
3. ISS (In School Suspension) 
4. Mental Health Recommendation (Day Springs, Living Hope, or Delta Counseling) 
5. OSS (Out of School Suspension) 
6. Expulsion 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-15-1005(b) (2) 
 A.C.A. § 5-74-201 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/30/2011 
 
 
4.27 – STUDENT SEXUAL HARASSMENT 
 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School District is committed to having an academic environment in which all students are treated 
with respect and dignity. Student achievement is best attained in an atmosphere of equal educational opportunity that 
is free of discrimination. Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination that undermines the integrity of the 
educational environment and will not be tolerated. 
 
Believing that prevention is the best policy, the District will periodically inform students and employees about the 
nature of sexual harassment, the procedures for registering a complaint, and the possible redress that is available. 
The information will stress that the district does not tolerate sexual harassment and that students can report 
inappropriate behavior of a sexual nature without fear of adverse consequences. The information will take into 
account and be appropriate to the age of the students. 
 
It shall be a violation of this policy for any student to be subjected to, or to subject another person to, sexual 
harassment as defined in this policy. Any student found, after an investigation, to have engaged in sexual harassment 
will be subject to disciplinary action up to, and including, expulsion. 
 
Sexual harassment refers to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other personally offensive 
verbal, visual, or physical conduct of a sexual nature made by someone under any of the following conditions: 
1. Submission to the conduct is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of an individual’s 
education; 
2. Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic decisions 
affecting that individual; and/or 
3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s academic 
performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive academic environment. 
 
The terms “intimidating,” “hostile,” and “offensive” include conduct of a sexual nature which has the effect of 
humiliation or embarrassment and is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it limits the student’s ability to 
participate in, or benefit from, an educational program or activity. 
 
Actionable sexual harassment is generally established when an individual is exposed to a pattern of objectionable 
behaviors or when a single, serious act is committed. What is, or is not, sexual harassment will depend upon all of 
the surrounding circumstances. Depending upon such circumstances, examples of sexual harassment include, but 
are not limited to: unwelcome touching; crude jokes or pictures; discussions of sexual experiences; pressure for 
sexual activity; intimidation by words, actions, insults, or name calling; teasing related to sexual characteristics or the 
belief or perception that an individual is not conforming to expected gender roles or conduct or is homosexual, 
regardless of whether or not the student self-identifies as homosexual; and spreading rumors related to a person’s 
alleged sexual activities. 
 
Students who believe they have been subjected to sexual harassment, or parents of a student who believes their child 
has been subjected to sexual harassment, are encouraged to file a complaint by contacting a counselor, teacher, Title 

IX coordinator, or administrator who will assist them in the complaint process. Under no circumstances shall a 
student be required to first report allegations of sexual harassment to a school contact person if that person is the 
individual who is accused of the harassment. 
 
To the extent possible, complaints will be treated in a confidential manner. Limited disclosure may be necessary in 
order to complete a thorough investigation. Students who file a complaint of sexual harassment will not be subject to 
retaliation or reprisal in any form. 
 
Students who knowingly fabricate allegations of sexual harassment shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and 
including expulsion. 
 
Individuals, who withhold information, purposely provide inaccurate facts, or otherwise hinder an investigation of 
sexual harassment shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion. 
 
Violation of this policy will be dealt with in the following manner: 
1. First Offense: Parent conferences with counselor to make clear that the behavior is unacceptable and 
against the law. (Title VII Civil Rights 1964) 
2. Second Offense: Re-notification of parents for the purpose of making them aware they are responsible for 
the student’s behavior. Punishment -- three days in-school suspension. 
3. Third Offense: Suspension at Administrator’s discretion. 
Legal References: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 USC 1681, et seq. 
 A.C.A. § 6-15-1005 (b) (1) 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/30/2011 
 
 
4.28 – LASER POINTERS 
 
 
 
Students shall not possess any hand held laser pointer while in school; on or about school property, before or after 
school; in attendance at school or any school-sponsored activity; en route to or from school or any school-sponsored 
activity; off the school grounds at any school bus stop or at any school-sponsored activity or event. School personnel 
shall seize any laser pointer from the student possessing it and the student may reclaim it at the close of the school 
year, or when the student is no longer enrolled in the District. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-512 
 A.C.A. § 5-60-122 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 
 
4.29 – INTERNET SAFETY & ELECTRONIC DEVICE USE POLICY 
 
 
 
 
Definition 
For the purposes of this policy, "electronic device" means anything that can be used to transmit or capture 
images, sound, or data. 
 
The District makes electronic device(s) and/or electronic device Internet access available to students, to 
permit students to perform research and to allow students to learn how to use electronic device 
technology. Use of district electronic devices is for educational and/or instructional purposes only. 
Student use of electronic device(s) shall only be as directed or assigned by staff or teachers; students are 
advised that they enjoy no expectation of privacy in any aspect of their electronic device use, including 
email, and that monitoring of student electronic device use is continuous. 
 
No student will be granted Internet access until and unless an Internet and electronic device use 
agreement, signed by both the student and the parent or legal guardian (if the student is under the age of 
eighteen [18]) is on file. The current version of the Internet and electronic device use agreement is 
incorporated by reference into board policy and is considered part of the student handbook. 
 
Technology Protection Measures 

The District is dedicated to protecting students from materials on the Internet or world wide web that are 
inappropriate, obscene, or otherwise harmful to minors; therefore, it is the policy of the District to protect 
each electronic device with Internet filtering software2 that is designed to prevent students from accessing 
such materials. For purposes of this policy, “harmful to minors” means any picture, image, graphic image 
file, or other visual depiction that: 
1. Taken as a whole and with respect to minors, appeals to a prurient interest in nudity, sex, or 
excretion; 
2. Depicts, describes, or represents, in a patently offensive way with respect to what is suitable for 
minors, an actual or simulated sexual act or sexual contact, actual or simulated normal or 
perverted sexual acts, or a lewd exhibition of the genitals; and 
3. Taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value as to minors. 
 
Internet Use and Safety 
The District is dedicated to ensuring that students are capable of using the Internet in a safe and 
responsible manner. The District uses technology protection measures to aid in student safety and shall 
also educate students on appropriate online behavior and Internet use3 including, but not limited to: 
1. interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms; 
2. Cyber bullying awareness; and 
3. Cyber bullying response. 
 
Misuse of Internet 
The opportunity to use the District’s technology to access the Internet is a privilege and not a right. 
Students who misuse electronic devices or Internet access in any way will face disciplinary action, as 
specified in the student handbook and/or Internet safety and electronic device use agreement. Misuse of 
the Internet includes: 
1. The disabling or bypassing of security procedures, compromising, attempting to compromise, or 
defeating the district’s technology network security or Internet filtering software; 
2. The altering of data without authorization; 
3. Disclosing, using, or disseminating passwords, whether the passwords are the student’s own or 
those of another student/faculty/community member, to other students; 
4. Divulging personally identifying information about himself/herself or anyone else either on the 
Internet or in an email unless it is a necessary and integral part of the student's academic 
endeavor. Personally identifying information includes full names, addresses, and phone numbers. 
5. Using electronic devices for any illegal activity, including electronic device hacking and 
copyright or intellectual property law violations; 
6. Using electronic devices to access or create sexually explicit or pornographic text or graphics; 
7. Using electronic devices to violate any other policy or is contrary to the Internet safety and 
electronic device use agreement. 
 
The principal will have discretion in administering the consequences for the student’s conduct, depending 
on the severity of the situation. Consequences may include one or more of the following: 
1. Warning – counseled by principal 
2. Parent Conference – to include teacher, counselor, and parents 
3. ISS (In School Suspension) 
4. Mental Health Recommendation (Day Springs, Living Hope, or Delta Counseling) 
5. OSS (Out of School Suspension) 
6. Expulsion 
Legal References: Children’s Internet Protection Act; PL 106-554 
FCC Final Rules 11-125 August 11, 2011 
20 USC 6777 
47 USC 254(h) (l) 
47 CFR 54.520 
47 CFR 520(c) (4) 
A.C.A. § 6-21-107 
A.C.A. § 6-21-111 
Date Adopted: 10/12/05 Last Revised: 3/20/14 

 
4.30 – SUSPENSION FROM SCHOOL 
 
 
 
 
Students who are not present at school cannot benefit from the educational opportunities the school 
environment affords. Administrators, therefore, shall strive to find ways to keep students in school as 
participants in the educational process. There are instances, however, when the needs of the other students 
or the interests of the orderly learning environment require the removal of a student from school. The 
Board authorizes school principals or their designees to suspend students for disciplinary reasons for a 
period of time not to exceed ten (10) school days,1 including the day upon which the suspension is 
imposed. The suspension may be in school or out of school. Students are responsible for their conduct 
that occurs 
. At any time on the school grounds; 
. Off school grounds at a school-sponsored function, activity, or event; and 
. Going to and from school or a school activity. 
 
A student may be suspended for behavior including, but not limited to that which: 
1. Is in violation of school policies, rules, or regulations; 
2. Substantially interferes with the safe and orderly educational environment; 
3. School administrators believe will result in the substantial interference with the safe and orderly 
educational environment; and/or 
Is insubordinate, incorrigible, violent, or involves moral turpitude 
 
Out-of-school suspension shall not be used to discipline a student for skipping class, excessive 
absences, or other forms of truancy. 
 
The school principal or designee shall proceed as follows in deciding whether or not to suspend a student: 
a) the student shall be given written notice or advised orally of the charges against him/her; 
b) if the student denies the charges, he/she shall be given an explanation of the evidence 
against him/her and be allowed to present his/her version of the facts; and 
c) if the principal finds the student guilty of the misconduct, he/she may be suspended. 
 
When possible, notice of the suspension, its duration, and any stipulations for the student’s readmittance 
to class will be given to the parent(s), legal guardian(s), or to the student if age eighteen (18) or older 
prior to the suspension. Such notice shall be handed to the parent(s), legal guardian(s), or to the student if 
age eighteen (18) or older or mailed to the last address reflected in the records of the school district. 
 
Generally, notice and hearing should precede the student's removal from school, but if prior notice and 
hearing are not feasible, as where the student's presence endangers persons or property or threatens 
disruption of the academic process, thus justifying immediate removal from school, the necessary notice 
and hearing should follow as soon as practicable. 
 
It is the parents’ or legal guardians’ responsibility to provide current contact information to the district, 
which the school shall use to immediately notify the parent or legal guardian upon the suspension of a 
student. The notification shall be by one of the following means, listed in order of priority:2 
. A primary call number; 
o The contact may be by voice, voice mail, or text message 
. An email address; 
. A regular first class letter to the last known mailing address. 
 
The district shall keep a log of contacts attempted and made to the parent or legal guardian. 
 
During the period of their suspension, students serving out-of-school suspensions are not permitted on 
campus except to attend a student/parent/administrator conference.3 
 

During the period of their suspension, students serving in-school suspension shall not attend or participate 
in any school-sponsored activities during the imposed suspension. 
 
Suspensions initiated by the principal or his/her designee may be appealed to the Superintendent, but not 
to the Board. 
 
Suspensions initiated by the Superintendent may be appealed to the Board. 
 
If a student had been suspended from school the work missed during the suspension assignment 
will not be made up. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-507 
 Goss v Lopez , 419 U.S. 565 (1975) 
Date Adopted: 08/09/2007 Last Revised: June 2016 
 
 IN-SCHOOL SUSPENSION 
 
 
 
 
The purpose of the in-school suspension (ISS) program is to provide for students (who are chronic 
disruptions to the daily routine in the regular classroom) a place where they can complete classroom work 
and not fall behind in their academics. It will be used after other forms of discipline have been tried 
without success. It may be used for an immediate placement in case of a severe disruption. 
 
If a temporary placement is made, the parents will be called and advised of the action that has been taken 
and the reason for said action. If the parent cannot be reached by telephone, a note will be sent home with 
the student(s) to advise the parents. If a three-day or more placement is made, the parent will be notified 
the day before the student is to report to In-School-Suspension. One notice will be sent home by the 
student and another copy will be mailed to the parents. 
 
While assigned to In-School Suspension, a student may not participate in or attend any school activities 
involving Drew Central Schools at home or away. If a student attempts to do so, he/she will be asked to 
leave, and will be assigned one extra day of In-School Suspension. If a student refuses to comply with the 
In-School Suspension assignment, he/she will be suspended from school for the entirety of the In-School 
Suspension assignment. 
 
 
4.31 – EXPULSION 
 
 
 
The Board of Education may expel a student for a period longer than ten (10) school days for violation of the 
District’s written discipline policies. The Superintendent may make a recommendation of expulsion to the Board of 
Education for student conduct deemed to be of such gravity that suspension would be inappropriate, or where the 
student’s continued attendance at school would disrupt the orderly learning environment or would pose an 
unreasonable danger to the welfare of other students or staff. 
 
The Superintendent or his/her designee shall give written notice to the parents or legal guardians (mailed to the 
address reflected on the District’s records) that he/she will recommend to the Board of Education that the student be 
expelled for the specified length of time and state the reasons for the recommendation to expel. The notice shall give 
the date, hour, and place where the Board of Education will consider and dispose of the recommendation. 
 
The hearing shall be conducted not later than ten (10) school days following the date of the notice, except that 
representatives of the Board and student may agree in writing to a date not conforming to this limitation. 
 
The President of the Board, Board attorney, or other designated Board member shall preside at the hearing. The 
student may choose to be represented by legal counsel. Both the district administration and School Board also may 
be represented by legal counsel. The hearing shall be conducted in open session of the Board unless the parent, or 

student if age18 or older, requests that the hearing be conducted in executive session. Any action taken by the Board 
shall be in open session. 
 
During the hearing, the Superintendent, or designee, or representative will present evidence, including the calling of 
witnesses that gave rise to the recommendation of expulsion. The student, or his/her representative, may then present 
evidence including statements from persons with personal knowledge of the events or circumstances relevant to the 
charges against the student. Formal cross-examination will not be permitted. However, any member of the Board, 
the Superintendent, or designee, the student, or his/her representative may question anyone making a statement 
and/or the student. The presiding officer shall decide questions concerning the appropriateness or relevance of any 
questions asked during the hearing. 
 
Except as permitted by policy 4.22, the Superintendent shall recommend the expulsion of any student for a period of 
not less than one (1) year for possession of any firearm prohibited on school campus by law. The Superintendent 
shall, however, have the discretion to modify the expulsion recommendation for a student on a case-by-case basis. 
Parents or legal guardians of a student enrolling from another school after the expiration of an expulsion period for a 
weapons policy violation shall be given a copy of the current laws regarding the possibility of parental responsibility 
for allowing a child to possess a weapon on school property. The parents or legal guardians shall sign a statement 
acknowledging that they have read and understand said laws prior to the student being enrolled in school. 
 
The Superintendent and the Board of Education shall complete the expulsion process of any student that was 
initiated because the student possessed a firearm or other prohibited weapon on school property regardless of the 
enrollment status of the student. 
 
Cross Reference: Policy 4.22—WEAPONS AND DANGEROUS INSTRUMENTS 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-507 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2009 Last Revised: 07/16/2009 
 
4.32 – SEARCH, SEIZURE, AND INTERROGATIONS 
 
 
 
The District respects the rights of its students against arbitrary intrusion of their person and property. At 
the same time, it is the responsibility of school officials to protect the health, safety, and welfare of all 
students enrolled in the District in order to promote an environment conducive to student learning. The 
Superintendent, principals, and their designees have the right to inspect and search school property and 
equipment. They may also search students and their personal property in which the student has a 
reasonable expectation of privacy, when there is reasonable and individualized suspicion to believe such 
student or property contains illegal items or other items in violation of Board policy or dangerous to the 
school community. School authorities may seize evidence found in the search and disciplinary action 
may be taken. Evidence found which appears to be in violation of the law shall be reported to the 
appropriate authority. 
 
School property shall include, but not be limited to, lockers, desks, and parking lots, as well as personal 
effects left there by students. When possible, prior notice will be given and the student will be allowed to 
be present along with an adult witness; however, searches may be done at any time with or without notice 
or the student’s consent. A personal search must not be excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of 
the student and the nature of the infraction. 
 
The Superintendent, principals, and their designees may request the assistance of law enforcement 
officials to help conduct searches. Such searches may include the use of specially trained dogs. 
 
A school official of the same sex shall conduct personal searches with an adult witness of the same sex 
present. 
 
State Law requires that Department of Human Services employees, local law enforcement, or agents of 
the Crimes Against Children Division of the Department of Arkansas State Police, may interview students 

without a court order for the purpose of investigating suspected child abuse. In instances where the 
interviewers deem it necessary, they may exercise a “72-hour hold” without first obtaining a court order. 
Other questioning of students by non-school personnel shall be granted only with a court order directing 
such questioning, with permission of the parents of a student (or the student if above eighteen [18] years 
of age), or in response to a subpoena or arrest warrant. 
 
If the District makes a report to any law enforcement agency concerning student misconduct or if access 
to a student is granted to a law enforcement agency due to a court order, the principal or the principal’s 
designee shall make a good faith effort to contact the student’s parent, legal guardian, or other person 
having lawful control by court order, or person acting in loco parentis on student enrollment forms. The 
principal or the principal's designee shall not attempt to make such contact if presented documentation by 
the investigator that notification is prohibited because a parent, guardian, custodian, or person standing in 
loco parentis is named as an alleged offender of the suspected child maltreatment. This exception applies 
only to interview requests made by a law enforcement officer, an investigator of the Crimes Against 
Children Division of the Department of Arkansas State Police, or an investigator or employee of the 
Department of Human Services. 
 
In instances other than those related to cases of suspected child abuse, principals must release a student to 
either a police officer who presents a subpoena for the student, or a warrant for arrest, or to an agent of 
state social services or an agent of a court with jurisdiction over a child with a court order signed by a 
judge. Upon release of the student, the principal or designee shall give the student’s parent, legal 
guardian, or other person having lawful control by court order, or person acting in loco parentis notice 
that the student has been taken into custody by law enforcement personnel or a state’s social services 
agency. If the principal or designee is unable to reach the parent, he or she shall make a reasonable, good 
faith effort to get a message to the parent to call the principal or designee, and leave both a day and an 
after-hours telephone number. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-513 
 A.C.A. § 9-13-104 
A.C.A. § 12-18-609, 610, 613 
A.C.A. § 12-18-1001, 1005 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: January 23, 2015 
 
 
4.34—COMMUNICABLE DISEASES & PARASITES 
 
 
 
 
Students with communicable diseases or with human host parasites that are transmittable in a school 
environment shall demonstrate respect for other students by not attending school while they are capable 
of transmitting their condition to others. Students whom the school nurse determines are unwell or unfit 
for school attendance or who are believed to have a communicable disease or condition will be required 
to be picked up by their parent or guardian. Specific examples include, but are not limited to: Varicella 
(chicken pox), measles, scabies, conjunctivitis (Pink Eye), impetigo/MRSA (Methicillin-resistant 
Staphylococcus aureus), streptococcal and staphylococcal infections, ringworm, mononucleosis, Hepatitis 
A, B, or C, mumps, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever (100.4 F when taken orally). A student who has been 
sent home by the school nurse will be subsequently readmitted, at the discretion of the school nurse, when 
the student is no longer a transmission risk. In some instances, a letter from a health care provider may be 
required prior to the student being readmitted to the school. 
 
To help control the possible spread of communicable diseases, school personnel shall follow the District's 
exposure control plan when dealing with any blood borne, food borne, and airborne pathogens exposures. 
Standard precautions shall be followed relating to the handling, disposal, and cleanup of blood and other 
potentially infectious materials such as all body fluids, secretions and excretions (except sweat). 
 
In accordance with 4.57—IMMUNIZATIONS, the District shall maintain a copy of each student's 
immunization record and a list of individuals with exemptions from immunization which shall be 
education records as defined in policy 4.13. That policy provides that an education record may be 

disclosed to appropriate parties in connection with an emergency if knowledge of the information is 
necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. 
 
A student enrolled in the District who has an immunization exemption may be removed from school at 
the discretion of the Arkansas Department of Health during an outbreak of the disease for which the 
student is not vaccinated. The student may not return to the school until the outbreak has been resolved 
and the student's return to school is approved by the Arkansas Department of Health. 
 
The parents or legal guardians of students found to have live human host parasites that are transmittable 
in a school environment will be asked to pick their child as soon as possible. The parents or legal 
guardians will be given information concerning the eradication and control of human host parasites. A 
student may be readmitted after the school nurse or designee has determined the student no longer has 
live human host parasites that are transmittable in a school environment. When live human host parasites 
are found on a student, the student will be allowed one excused early dismissal absence and one excused 
full day absence to obtain treatment. 
 
Each school may conduct screenings of students for human host parasites that are transmittable in a 
school environment as needed. The screenings shall be conducted in a manner that respects the privacy 
and confidentiality of each student. 
Cross References: 4.2—ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 4.7—ABSENCES 
 4.13—PRIVACY OF STUDENTS’ RECORDS/ DIRECTORY INFORMATION 
 4.57—IMMUNIZATIONS 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-702 
 Arkansas State Board of Health Rules And Regulations Pertaining To Immunization 
Requirements 
Arkansas Department of Education Rules Governing Kindergarten Through 12th Grade Immunization 
Requirements 
Cross References: 4.2—ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 4.13—PRIVACY OF STUDENTS’ RECORDS/ DIRECTORY INFORMATION 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-702 
Arkansas State Board of Health Rules And Regulations Pertaining To Immunization Requirements 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: January, 2016 
 
 
4.35—STUDENT MEDICATIONS 
 
 
 
 
Prior to the administration of any medication to any student under the age of eighteen (18), a written physician’s 
order and a parental consent are required. The consent form shall include authorization to administer the medication 
and relieve the Board and its employees of civil liability for damages or injuries resulting from the administration of 
medication to students in accordance with this policy. All signed medication consent forms are to be maintained by 
the school nurse. 
 
Unless authorized to self-administer, students are not allowed to carry any medications, including over-the-counter 
medications or any perceived health remedy not regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, while at 
school. The parent or legal guardian shall bring the student’s medication to the school nurse. The student may bring 
the medication if accompanied by a written authorization from the parent or legal guardian. When medications are 
brought to the school nurse, the nurse shall document, in the presence of the parent, the quantity of the 
medication(s). 
 
Medications, including those for self-administration, must be in the original container and be properly labeled with 
the student’s name, the ordering provider’s name, the name of the medication, the dosage, frequency, and 
instructions for the administration of the medication (including times). Additional information accompanying the 
medication shall state the purpose for the medication, its possible side effects, and any other pertinent instructions 
(such as special storage requirements) or warnings. Schedule II medications that are permitted by this policy to be 
brought to school shall be stored in a double locked cabinet. 
 
Medication administration consent forms are available in the school office or the nurse’s office. 
 

Students with an individualized health plan (IHP) may be given over-the-counter medications to the extent giving 
such medications are included in the student's IHP. 
 
The only Schedule II medications that shall be allowed to be brought to the school are methylphenidate (e.g. Ritalin 
or closely related medications as determined by the school nurse), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), and 
amphetamine sulfate (e.g. Adderall or closely related medications as determined by the school nurse). 
 
For the student's safety, no student will be allowed to attend school if the student is currently taking any other 
Schedule II medication than permitted by this policy. Students who are taking Schedule II medications which are 
not allowed to be brought to school shall be eligible for homebound instruction if provided for in their IEP or 504 
plans. 
 
The district's supervising registered nurse shall be responsible for creating both on campus and off campus 
procedures for administering medications. 
 
Students who have written permission from their parent or guardian and a licensed health care practitioner on file 
with the District may: 
1) Self-administer either a rescue inhaler or auto-injectable epinephrine; 
2. Perform his/her own blood glucose checks; 
3. Administer insulin through the insulin delivery system the student uses; 
4. Treat the student’s own hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia; or 
5. Possess on his or her person: 
a. A rescue inhaler or auto-injectable epinephrine; or 
b. The necessary supplies and equipment to perform his/her own diabetes monitoring and treatment 
functions. 
 
Students who have a current consent form on file shall be allowed to carry and self-administer such medication 
while: 
. In school; 
. At an on-site school sponsored activity; 
. While traveling to or from school; or 
. At an off-site school sponsored activity. 
 
A student is prohibited from sharing, transferring, or in any way diverting his/her medications to any other person. 
The fact that a student with a completed consent form on file is allowed to carry a rescue inhaler, auto-injectable 
epinephrine, diabetes medication, or combination does not require him/her to have such on his/her person. The 
parent or guardian of a student who qualifies under this policy to self-carry a rescue inhaler, auto-injectable 
epinephrine, diabetes medication, or any combination on his/her person shall provide the school with the appropriate 
medication, which shall be immediately available to the student in an emergency. 
 
Students may be administered Glucagon, in emergency situations by the school nurse or, in the absence of the 
school nurse, a trained volunteer school employee designated as a care provider, provided the student has: 
1. An IHP that provides for the administration of Glucagon, insulin, or both in emergency situations; and 
2. A current, valid consent form on file from their parent or guardian. 
 
When the nurse is unavailable, the trained volunteer school employee who is responsible for a student 
shall be released from other duties during: 
A. The time scheduled for a dose of insulin in the student’s IHP; and 
B. Glucagon or non-scheduled insulin administration once other staff have relieved him/her from 
other duties until a parent, guardian, other responsible adult, or medical personnel has arrived. 
 
A student shall have access to a private area to perform diabetes monitoring and treatment functions as outlined in 
the student's IHP. 
 

Emergency Administration of Epinephrine 
The school nurse or other school employees designated by the school nurse as a care provider who have been 
trained and certified by a licensed physician may administer an epinephrine auto-injector in emergency situations to 
students who have an IHP developed under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which provides for the 
administration of an epinephrine auto-injector in emergency situations. 
 
The parent of a student who has an authorizing IHP, or the student if over the age of eighteen (18), shall annually 
complete and sign a written consent form provided by the student's school nurse authorizing the nurse or other 
school employee certified to administer auto-injector epinephrine to the student when the employee believes the 
student is having a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction. 
 
Students with an order from and a licensed health care provider to self-administer auto-injectable epinephrine and 
who have written permission from their parent or guardian shall provide the school nurse an epinephrine auto-
injector. This epinephrine will be used in the event the school nurse, or other school employee certified to administer 
auto-injector epinephrine, in good faith professionally believes the student is having a life-threatening anaphylactic 
reaction and the student is either not self-carrying his/her epinephrine auto-injector or the nurse is unable to locate it. 
 
The school nurse for each District school may keep epinephrine auto-injectors on hand that are suitable for the 
students the school serves. The school nurse or other school employee designated by the school nurse as a care 
provider who has been trained1 and certified by a licensed physician may administer auto-injector epinephrine to 
those students who the school nurse, or other school employee certified to administer auto-injector epinephrine, in 
good faith professionally believes is having a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction. 
 
The school shall not keep outdated medications or any medications past the end of the school year. Parents shall be 
notified ten (10) days in advance of the school’s intention to dispose of any medication. Medications not picked up 
by the parents or legal guardians within the ten (10) day period shall be disposed of by the school nurse in 
accordance with current law and regulations. 
Legal References: Ark. State Board of Nursing: School Nurse Roles and Responsibilities 
Arkansas Department of Education and Arkansas State Board of Nursing Rules Governing the 
Administration of Insulin and Glucagon to Arkansas Public School Students With Diabetes 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-711 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-1005(a)(6) 
A.C.A. § 17-87-103 (11) 
A.C.A. § 20-13-405 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: June 2016 
 
 
4.37—EMERGENCY DRILLS 
 
 
 
 
All schools in the District shall conduct fire drills at least monthly. Tornado drills shall also be conducted 
no fewer than three (3) times per year with at least one each in the months of September, January, and 
February. Students, who ride school buses, shall also participate in emergency evacuation drills at least 
twice each school year. 
 
The District shall annually conduct an active shooter drill and school safety assessment for all District 
schools in collaboration with local law enforcement and emergency management personnel. The training 
will include a lockdown exercise with panic button alert system training. Students will be included in the 
drills to the extent that is developmentally appropriate for the age of both the students and grade 
configuration of the school. 
 
Drills may be conducted during the instructional day or during non-instructional time periods. 
 
Other types of emergency drills may also be conducted to test the implementation of the District's 
emergency plans in the event of violence, terrorist attack, natural disaster, other emergency, or the 
District’s Panic Button Alert System. Students shall be included in the drills to the extent practicable. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 12-13-109 
A.C.A. § 6-10-110 

A.C.A. § 6-10-121 
A.C.A. § 6-15-1302 
A.C.A. § 6-15-1303 
Ark. Division of Academic Facilities and Transportation Rules Governing Maintenance and Operations of Ark. 
Public School Buses and Physical Examinations of School Bus Drivers 4.03.1 
Date Adopted: August 9, 2007 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
4.38 – PERMANENT RECORDS 
 
 
 
Permanent school records, as required by the Arkansas Department of Education, shall be maintained for each 
student enrolled in the District until the student receives a high school diploma or its equivalent or is beyond the age 
of compulsory school attendance. A copy of the student’s permanent record shall be provided to the receiving 
school district within ten (10) school days after the date a request from the receiving school district is received. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-901 
 ADE Rule Student Permanent Records 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 08/14/2008 
 
4.39 – CORPORAL PUNISHMENT 
 
 
 
 
The Drew Central School Board authorizes the use of corporal punishment to be administered in accordance with 
this policy by the Superintendent or his/her designated staff members who are required to have a state-issued license 
as a condition of their employment. 
 
Prior to the administration of corporal punishment, the student receiving the corporal punishment shall be given an 
explanation of the reasons for the punishment and be given an opportunity to refute the charges. 
 
All corporal punishment shall be administered privately, i.e. out of the sight and hearing of other students, shall not 
be excessive, or administered with malice, and shall be administered in the presence of another school administrator 
or designee who shall be licensed staff member employed by the District. 
 
Act 333 of 1995 Authorizes any teacher or principal to use corporal punishment with the following 
provisions: 
1. It follows warnings that the behavior will not be tolerated. 
2. It may be used only after other alternatives, including but not limited to counseling, which has 
failed or in unusual circumstances. A maximum of three (3) licks with a standard school paddle. 
3. An attempt will be made to contact the parent or guardian prior to corporal punishment. If 
corporal punishment is given, the parent or guardian will be notified by mail the date and reason 
for such punishment. 
4. It will be administered in the office of the appropriate administrator. 
5. It will not be administered in the presence of other students, with malice or anger or in excess. 
6. Before corporal punishment is administered, the student should be advised of the rule and 
infraction of which he / she is being punished in the presence of the administrator. If the student 
claims innocence, the certified employee will permit the student to state his/her position. School 
officials will conduct formal hearings prior to corporal punishment. 
7. Refusal to take corporal punishment will result in a three day suspension from school. 
8. The principal will be present when corporal punishment is administered, and a written report shall 
be filed in the principal’s office and be signed by the person administering the punishment and 
the witness. 
9. A corporal punishment may be substituted (upon student’s or parent’s request) for a d-hall or in-
school suspension one time per semester. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-503 (b) 
 A.C.A. § 6-18-505 (c) (1) 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 6/14/2012 
 
 
 

 
4.40 – HOMELESS STUDENTS 
 
 
Hom 
The Drew Central School District will afford the same services and educational opportunities to homeless 
children as are afforded to non-homeless children. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall appoint 
an appropriate staff person to be the local educational agency (LEA) liaison for homeless children and 
youth whose responsibilities shall include, but are not limited to: 
. Receive appropriate time and training in order to carry out the duties required by law and this 
policy; 
. coordinate and collaborate with the State Coordinator, community, and school personnel 
responsible for education and related services to homeless children and youths; 
. Ensure that school personnel receive professional development and other support regarding their 
duties and responsibilities for homeless youths; 
. Ensure that unaccompanied homeless youths: 
o Are enrolled in school; 
o Have opportunities to meet the same challenging State academic standards as other children 
and youths; and 
o Are informed of their status as independent students under the Higher Education Act of 1965 
and that they may obtain assistance from the LEA liaison to receive verification of such status 
for purposes of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid; 
o Ensure that public notice of the educational rights of the homeless children and youths is 
disseminated in locations frequented by parents or guardians of such youth, and 
unaccompanied homeless youths, including schools, shelters, public libraries, and soup 
kitchens, in a manner and form that is easily understandable. 
 
To the extent possible, the LEA liaison and the building principal shall work together to ensure no 
homeless child or youth is harmed due to conflicts with District policies solely because of the homeless 
child or youth’s living situation; this is especially true for District policies governing fees, fines, and 
absences.1 
 
Notwithstanding Policy 4.1, homeless students living in the district are entitled to enroll in the district’s 
school that non-homeless students who live in the same attendance area are eligible to attend. If there is a 
question concerning the enrollment of a homeless child due to a conflict with Policy 4.1 or 4.2, the child 
shall be immediately admitted to the school in which enrollment is sought pending resolution of the 
dispute, including all appeals. It is the responsibility of the District’s LEA liaison for homeless children 
and youth to carry out the dispute resolution process. 
 
For the purposes of this policy “school of origin” means: 
. The school that a child or youth attended when permanently housed or the school in which the 
child or youth was last enrolled, including a preschool; and 
. The designated receiving school at the next grade level for all feeder schools when the child 
completes the final grade provided by the school of origin. 
 
The District shall do one of the following according to what is in the best interests of a homeless child:. 
Continue the child's or youth's education in the school of origin for the duration of homelessness: 
. In any case in which a family becomes homeless between academic years or during an 
academic year; and 
. For the remainder of the academic year, if the child or youth becomes permanently housed 
during an academic year; or 
Enroll the child or youth in any public school that nonhomeless students who live in the 
attendance area in which the child or youth is actually living are eligible to attend. 
 
In determining the best interest of the child or youth, the District shall: 

o Presume that keeping the child or youth in the school of origin is in the child's or youth's best 
interest, except when doing so is contrary to the request of the child's or youth's parent or 
guardian, or (in the case of an unaccompanied youth) the youth; 
o Consider student-centered factors related to the child's or youth's best interest, including factors 
related to the impact of mobility on achievement, education, health, and safety of homeless 
children and youth, giving priority to the request of the child's or youth's parent or guardian or (in 
the case of an unaccompanied youth) the youth. 
 
If the District determines that it is not in the child's or youth's best interest to attend the school of origin or 
the school requested by the parent or guardian, or (in the case of an unaccompanied youth) the youth, the 
District shall provide the child's or youth's parent or guardian or the unaccompanied youth with a written 
explanation of the reasons for its determination, in a manner and form understandable to such parent, 
guardian, or unaccompanied youth, including information regarding the right to appeal. For an 
unaccompanied youth, the District shall ensure that the LEA liaison assists in placement or enrollment 
decisions, gives priority to the views of such unaccompanied youth, and provides notice to such youth of 
the right to appeal. 
 
The homeless child or youth must be immediately enrolled in the selected school regardless of whether 
application or enrollment deadlines were missed during the period of homelessness. 
 
The District shall be responsible for providing transportation for a homeless child, at the request of the 
parent or guardian (or in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the LEA Liaison), to and from the child’s 
school of origin.*2 
 
For the purposes of this policy, students shall be considered homeless if they lack a fixed, regular, and 
adequate nighttime residence and: 
A. Are: 
. Sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar 
reason; 
. Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative 
adequate accommodations; 
. Living in emergency or transitional shelters; 
. Abandoned in hospitals; or 
. Awaiting foster care placement; 
B. Have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily 
used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings; 
C. Are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train 
stations, or similar settings; and 
D. Are migratory children who are living in circumstances described in clauses (a) through (c). 
 
In accordance with Federal law, information on a homeless child or youth’s living situation is part of the 
student’s education record and shall not be considered, or added, to the list of directory information in 
Policy 4.13.3 
Legal References: 42 U.S.C. § 11431 et seq.** 
 42 U.S.C. § 11431 (2) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432(g)(1)(H)(I) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(1)(J)(i), (ii), (iii), (iii)(I), (iii)(II) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(3)(A), (A)(i), (A)(i)(I), (A)(i)(II), (A)(ii) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(3)(B)(i), (ii), (iii) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(3)(C)(i), (ii), (iii) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(3)(E)(i), (ii), (iii) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(3)(G) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11432 (g)(4) (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) 
 42 U.S.C. § 11434a 
Date Adopted: Last Revised:January 2016 
 
 
 

 
4.41-PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS OR SCREENINGS 
 
 
 
 
 
The district conducts routine health screenings such as hearing, vision, and scoliosis due to the 
importance these health factors play in the ability of a student to succeed in school. The intent of the 
exams or screenings is to detect defects in hearing, vision, or other elements of health that would 
adversely affect the student’s ability to achieve to his/her full potential. 
The rights provided to parents under this policy transfer to the student when he/she turns eighteen (18) 
years old. 
Except in instances where a student is suspected of having a contagious or infectious disease, parents 
shall have the right to opt their student out of the exams or screenings by using form 4.41F or by 
providing certification from a physician that he/she has recently examined the student. 
 
ILLNESS AND INJURY 
First aid treatment is given by trained school personnel to students with minor injuries or when an 
accident occurs at school. If a student becomes seriously ill or is injured while at school and the 
parent/legal guardian cannot be contacted, the failure to make such contact shall not unreasonably delay 
the school’s expeditious transport of the student to an appropriate medical care facility. The school 
assumes no financial responsibility for treatment of the student. Drew Central’s policy regarding sick 
children is to call parents to pick up children who have a temperature 100F or higher, multiple episodes of 
diarrhea or vomiting, symptoms of conjunctivitis (pink eye) or any other communicable illness, an injury 
that requires additional medical treatment, or ongoing signs of illness where the nurse feels it would be 
beneficial for the child to be sent home. 
 
PLEASE complete both sides of the Emergency Care Card and return it to school as soon as possible. 
Keeping an accurate health history, active/current phone number/s, and emergency number/s, on file 
for your child is essential. Your immediate response is needed since a fever and/or vomiting usually 
indicate a contagious illness, thus the child's removal from other children is critical to prevent the spread 
of illness. Students who have had diarrhea, vomiting, and/or a temperature of 100 degrees or more should 
be kept home until free from symptoms for at least 24 hours. 
 
PERSONAL HYGIENE 
An important function of the school is to teach good personal hygiene, but this important lesson begins at 
home. Students are expected to come to school well groomed (clean, hair combed, teeth brushed, clean 
clothes). The school nurse or counselor may contact a parent via telephone or letter if a hygiene concern 
exists. A good night's sleep (at least eight hours or more) is also essential for a child to do his/her best 
academically. 
 
SCREENINGS 
. BMI (Body Mass Index) 
Measurements for body mass index are done on all K, 2,4,6,8 & 10th grade students. Parents may obtain a 
report of the screening by requesting it from the campus nurse. A parent may refuse this screening by 
submitting a refusal in writing to the school nurse prior to the screening date. 
 
. HEARING AND VISION 
Students in K, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 & 10th grades are screened to find students who may need further evaluation of 
hearing and vision. A referral letter will be sent to the parents whose children have shown they may have 
a problem that needs additional testing. Testing at school is of a general nature and is not meant to be a 
complete vision or hearing evaluation. Students who are given a referral from the nurse for further testing 
must provide proof within 60 days that a vision examination was completed by an optometrist. 
 
. SCOLIOSIS 
Scoliosis (curvature of the spine) screens are done on 6th grade girls and 8th grade girls and boys. 

Should any abnormality be discovered, the parent/guardian will receive a referral to the physician of their 
choice. A parent may refuse this screening by submitting a refusal in writing to the school nurse prior to 
the screening date 
 
ADMINISTRATION OF MEDICATION 
Parents are often unaware that all nurses, including school nurses, are prohibited from giving any 
medication--prescription or nonprescription--that is not ordered by a licensed physician. 
To protect the safety of all children from the misuse of medication, the policy of the Drew Central 
School District for administering medication is as follows: 
 
Other than medication used in first aid, approved school personnel shall give medication to children only 
when prescribed by a physician or dentist and a signed request by the parent/guardian along with the 
medication is supplied to the school. The Medication Consent Form must be completed by the 
parent/guardian and physician before any medication or procedures will be administered. This form must 
be updated at least annually. Medication to be given by school personnel shall be brought to the school by 
the parent /guardian and should be picked up by the parent/guardian at the time it is discontinued. No 
medication should be given to a student to transport to school or home other than inhalers (when 
permission is given by the parent and nurse). Medication will not be kept from one school year to another 
and will be disposed of if not picked up within 10 days of being discontinued or the last day of the school 
year. Medication to be given one, two, and three times a day are not administered at school unless 
specifically ordered by the physician to be given during the school day. 
 
PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION must be supplied to the school in the container dispensed by the 
pharmacy which contains the name of the prescribing physician or dentist, the child’s name, name of 
medication, dosage and time to be given. Medication will only be given exactly as prescribed on the 
medication label. The pharmacy label is acceptable as the physician’s order only if the prescription was 
filled within 30 days prior to the time it is brought to school. A signed Medication Consent Form must 
accompany the medication. 
 
OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATION must be supplied to the school in the container in which it 
was purchased and cannot be expired. The Medication Consent Form must be completed with a current 
physician’s written order and signature and the parent’s signature. 
 
MEDICATION ON FIELD TRIPS will be given by a trained school official. Injected insulin and 
Diastat must be administered by a parent or licensed nurse. 
 
SELF-ADMINISTRATION OF MEDICATION by students is not allowed except in rare 
circumstances (see Life Threatening Medical Conditions below). All medication will be stored in and 
dispensed from the school nurse’s office or other designated area. No prescription or over-the-counter 
medications are to be in a student’s possession at any time other than the exceptions below. 
 
SCHEDULE II MEDICATIONS (medications deemed to be “controlled” by the FDA due to having a 
great potential for abuse) that are allowed to be kept at school and dispensed by the school nurse include 
methylphenidate (Ritalin or closely related medications), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), and 
amphetamine sulfate (Adderall or closely related medications). For the student’s safety, no student will 
be allowed to attend school if the student is currently taking any other Schedule II medication than 
permitted by this policy. These students shall be eligible for homebound instruction if provided for in 
their IEP or 504 plans. 
 
LIFE THREATENING MEDICAL CONDITIONS 
If your child has been diagnosed with asthma, diabetes, seizures, or a life threatening allergy, please 
notify the school nurse and provide the appropriate medication as prescribed by your child’s physician. 
Minutes matter in a situation of this severity and having your child’s medications immediately available 
could prevent a tragedy. Plan of Care and Medication Authorization forms must be completed and signed 

by the child’s parent and physician. Forms are available from each school nurse and must be updated at 
least annually and when changes are required. In rare instances where life-threatening medical conditions 
exist, a student may need to carry their own medication (for example, asthma inhaler or EpiPen). In these 
instances, the Self-Carry portion at the bottom of the Medication Consent Form must be completed, 
signed and on file in the school nurse office. This consent requires that the physician, parent and school 
nurse agree that the student has the mental and physical ability to reliably self-carry his/her emergency 
medication. 
 
Glucagon may be administered in an emergency situation by either a school nurse or, in the absence of 
the school nurse, a trained volunteer school employee designated as a care provider as long as the student 
has an IHP (Individualized Healthcare Plan) which provides for the administration of Glucagon in an 
emergency situation and a current consent form signed by parent or guardian. 
 
IMMUNIZATION & KINDERGARTEN PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS 
The immunization requirements were revised for the 2015-2016 school year under Ark. Code Ann. §§ 20-
7-109, 6-18-702, 6-60-501-504, and 20-78-206. It is the responsibility of the parent/guardian to furnish 
the school with proof of the required immunizations. If your child is missing any required immunizations, 
your child MAY BE EXCLUDED FROM SCHOOL until the needed immunizations are received and 
documented proof is presented to the school. Transfer students have 30 days from the date of enrollment 
to provide proof of immunizations. The updated requirements for entrance into kindergarten and grades 
1st thru 12th are as follows: 
Vaccine 
Doses 
Specific Requirements 
Grades 
Required 
DTaP, DTP/DT, 
or Td 
4 
To include one dose on or after 4th birthday 
All students in 
grades K-12th 
Tdap 
1 
Any student 11 years or older by Sept. 1, 2014 
Students age 11 
and up 
Polio 
3 
To include one dose on or after 4th birthday 
All students in 
grades K-12th 
Hepatitis A 
1 
1 dose on or after 1st birthday 
Kindergarten & 
1st grade 
Hepatitis B 
3 
Students 11-15 y/o may have 2 dose schedule 
All students in 
grades K-12th 
MMR 
2 
 
All students in 
grades K-12th 
Varicella 
2 
Or verification of disease by a physician (MD, DO, 
PA, or APRN) 
All students in 
grades K-12th 
Meningococcal 
1 
All 7th graders & any student age 16 on Sept. 1, 
2014. 2nd dose due at age 16 if previously received 1 
dose. 
7th graders & 
students age 16 

 
 
IMMUNIZATION EXEMPTIONS 
Students who are exempt from immunization due to medical or religious reasons must furnish the school 
with an Immunization Exemption Certificate EACH YEAR from the Medical Director, Division of 
Communicable Disease/Immunization of the State of Arkansas. Parents must start the exemption process 
by calling 1-501-661-2169 and ask for an exemption application. 
 *A student enrolled in the District who has an immunization exemption may be removed from 
school during an outbreak of the disease for which the student is not vaccinated at the discretion 
of the Arkansas Department of Health. The student may not return to the school until the outbreak 
has been resolved and the student’s return to school is approved by the Arkansas Department of 
Health. 
 
 

HEALTH FORMS LOCATED IN THE BACK OF THE STUDENT HANDBOOK 
1} FERPA Release of Records Consent (must be completed yearly) 
2} Optional Medication Administration Consent that Includes Self-Carry Consent 
 
4.42 – STUDENT HANDBOOK 
 
 
 
 
 
It shall be the policy of the Drew Central school district that the most recently adopted version of the Student 
Handbook be incorporated by reference into the policies of this district. In the event that there is a conflict between 
the student handbook and a general board policy or policies, the more recently adopted language will be considered 
binding and controlling on the matter provided the parent(s) of the student, or the student if 18 years of age or older 
have acknowledged receipt of the controlling language. 
 
Principals and counselors shall also review Policies 4.45---SMART CORE CURRICULUM AND 
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLASSES OF 2010-11, 2011-12, AND 2012-13 and 4.45.1 –
SMART CORE CURRICULUM AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLASS OF 2013-14 
AND ALL CLASSES THEREAFTER and the current ADE Standards for Accreditation Rules to ensure that there 
is no conflict. If a conflict exists, the Principal and/or Counselor shall notify the Superintendent and Curriculum 
Coordinator immediately, so that corrections may be made and notice of the requirements given to students and 
parents. 
Date Adopted: 06/14/2007 Last Revised: 06/14/2012 
 
 
4.43 - BULLYING 
 
 
 
Respect for the dignity of others is a cornerstone of civil society. Bullying creates an atmosphere of fear 
and intimidation, robs a person of his/her dignity, detracts from the safe environment necessary to 
promote student learning, and will not be tolerated by the Board of Directors. Students who bully another 
person shall be held accountable for their actions whether they occur on school equipment or property; off 
school property at a school sponsored or approved function, activity, or event; going to or from school or 
a school activity in a school vehicle or school bus; or at designated school bus stops. 
 
A school principal or his or her designee who receives a credible report or complaint of bullying shall 
promptly investigate the complaint or report and make a record of the investigation and any action taken 
as a result of the investigation. 
 
Definitions: 
Attribute means an actual or perceived personal characteristic including without limitation race, color, 
religion, ancestry, national origin, socioeconomic status, academic status, disability, gender, gender 
identity, physical appearance, health condition, or sexual orientation; 
 
Bullying means the intentional harassment, intimidation, humiliation, ridicule, defamation, or threat or 
incitement of violence by a student against another student or public school employee by a written, 
verbal, electronic, or physical act that may address an attribute of the other student, public school 
employee, or person with whom the other student or public school employee is associated and that causes 
or creates actual or reasonably foreseeable: 
1. Physical harm to a public school employee or student or damage to the public school employee's 
or student's property; 
2. Substantial interference with a student's education or with a public school employee's role in 
education; 
3. A hostile educational environment for one (1) or more students or public school employees due to 
the severity, persistence, or pervasiveness of the act; or 
4. Substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the school or educational environment; 
 

Electronic act means without limitation a communication or image transmitted by means of an electronic 
device, including without limitation a telephone, wireless phone or other wireless communications device, 
computer, or pager that results in the substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the school or 
educational environment. Electronic acts of bullying are prohibited whether or not the electronic act 
originated on school property or with school equipment, if the electronic act is directed specifically at 
students or school personnel and maliciously intended for the purpose of disrupting school, and has a high 
likelihood of succeeding in that purpose; 
 
Harassment means a pattern of unwelcome verbal or physical conduct relating to another person's 
constitutionally or statutorily protected status that causes, or reasonably should be expected to cause, 
substantial interference with the other's performance in the school environment; and 
 
Substantial disruption means without limitation that any one or more of the following occur as a result 
of the bullying: 
1. Necessary cessation of instruction or educational activities; 
2. Inability of students or educational staff to focus on learning or function as an educational unit 
because of a hostile environment; 
3. Severe or repetitive disciplinary measures are needed in the classroom or during educational 
activities; or 
4. Exhibition of other behaviors by students or educational staff that substantially interfere with the 
learning environment. 
 
Cyber bullying of School Employees is expressly prohibited and includes, but is not limited to: 
1. Building a fake profile or website of the employee; 
2. Posting or encouraging others to post on the Internet private, personal, or sexual information 
pertaining to a school employee; 
3. Posting an original or edited image of the school employee on the Internet; 
4. Accessing, altering, or erasing any computer network, computer data program, or computer 
software, including breaking into a password-protected account or stealing or otherwise accessing 
passwords of a school employee; making repeated, continuing, or sustained electronic 
communications, including electronic mail or transmission, to a school employee; 
5. Making, or causing to be made, and disseminating an unauthorized copy of data pertaining to a 
school employee in any form, including without limitation the printed or electronic form of 
computer data, computer programs, or computer software residing in, communicated by, or 
produced by a computer or computer network; 
6. Signing up a school employee for a pornographic Internet site; or 
7. Without authorization of the school employee, signing up a school employee for electronic 
mailing lists or to receive junk electronic messages and instant messages. 
 
Examples of "Bullying" may also include but are not limited to a pattern of behavior involving one or 
more of the following: 
1. Sarcastic comments "compliments" about another student’s personal appearance or actual or 
perceived attributes, 
2. Pointed questions intended to embarrass or humiliate, 
3. Mocking, taunting or belittling, 
4. Non-verbal threats and/or intimidation such as “fronting” or “chesting” a person, 
5. Demeaning humor relating to a student’s race, gender, ethnicity or actual or perceived attributes, 
6. Blackmail, extortion, demands for protection money or other involuntary donations or loans, 
7. Blocking access to school property or facilities, 
8. Deliberate physical contact or injury to person or property, 
9. Stealing or hiding books or belongings, 
10. Threats of harm to student(s), possessions, or others, 
11. Sexual harassment, as governed by policy 4.27, is also a form of bullying, and/or 

12. Teasing or name-calling based on the belief or perception that an individual is not conforming to 
expected gender roles (Example: “Slut”) or conduct or is homosexual, regardless of whether the 
student self-identifies as homosexual (Examples: “You are so gay.” “Fag” “Queer”). 
 
Students are encouraged to report behavior they consider to be bullying, including a single action which if 
allowed to continue would constitute bullying, to their teacher or the building principal. The report may 
be made anonymously. Teachers and other school employees who have witnessed, or are reliably 
informed that, a student has been a victim of behavior they consider to be bullying, including a single 
action which if allowed to continue would constitute bullying, shall report the incident(s) to the principal. 
Parents or legal guardians may submit written reports of incidents they feel constitute bullying, or if 
allowed to continue would constitute bullying, to the principal. The principal shall be responsible for 
investigating the incident(s) to determine if disciplinary action is warranted. 
 
The person or persons reporting behavior they consider to be bullying shall not be subject to retaliation or 
reprisal in any form. 
 
Students found to be in violation of this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including 
expulsion. In determining the appropriate disciplinary action, consideration may be given to other 
violations of the student handbook which may have simultaneously occurred.1 
 
Notice of what constitutes bullying, the District’s prohibition against bullying, and the consequences for 
students who bully shall be conspicuously posted in every classroom, cafeteria, restroom, gymnasium, 
auditorium, and school bus. Parents, students, school volunteers, and employees shall be given copies of 
the notice. 
 
Copies of this policy shall be available upon request. 
 
Concluding whether a particular action or incident constitutes a violation of the bullying policy requires a 
determination based on all of the facts and surrounding circumstances, followed by the determination of 
disciplinary sanctions. A report may also be made to the appropriate law enforcement. 
Consequences and appropriate interventions for students who commit acts of bullying may range from 
positive behavioral interventions up to, but not limited to suspension according to severity of the 
incident(s). 
Discipline for violation of the Bullying policy as follows: 
. 1st Level – 3 days of Detention Hall or 3 days I.S.S. (depending on the severity of the incident). 
Student will write Bullying policy and consequences. 
. 2nd Level – Pattern of behavior (3 discipline incidents) – 5 days O.S.S. Recommendation of 
counseling and a report will be made to appropriate law enforcement officials. 
. 3rd Level –20 days A.L.E. /Expulsion (depending on the severity of the incidents) 
 
Act 1437 of 2005 requires that a student who files a complaint will not be subject to retaliation or reprisal 
in any form. Students found to be in violation of this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action up to 
and including expulsion. In determining the appropriate disciplinary action, consideration may be given 
to other violations of the student handbook which may have simultaneously occurred. 
Notice of what constitutes bullying, the District’s prohibition against bullying, and the consequences for 
students who bully shall be conspicuously posted in every classroom, cafeteria, restroom, gymnasium, 
auditorium, and school bus. Parents, students, school volunteers, and employees shall be given copies of 
the notice. 
The District has no duty to regulate off-campus internet messages, statements, postings, or acts. 
Nevertheless, the District reserves the right to regulate, review, investigate, and discipline students for 
harassment, intimidation, bullying or cyber-bullying, or for other disciplinary violations when such 
activities threaten violence against another student or otherwise disrupt the learning environment or 
orderly conduct of the school, school business, or school activities. 

. Consequences and appropriate interventions for a school/district employee found to have 
committed an act of bullying will be instituted in accordance with District policies, procedures, 
and agreements. Additionally, egregious acts of bullying by certified educators may result in a 
sanction against an educator’s state issued certificate. 
. Consequences and appropriate intervention for a visitor or volunteer, found to have committed an 
act of bullying shall be determined by the school administrator after consideration of the nature 
and circumstances of the act, including reports to appropriate law enforcement officials. 
. These same actions will apply to persons, whether they are students, school employees, or 
visitors/volunteers/independent contractors, who are found to have made wrongful and intentional 
accusations of another as a means of bullying. 
. Posted notice: A circle with a line through it over the word Bullying (similar to a non-smoking 
logo). Beside the logo may be written: Mean talk or hurting other people is called bullying. 
Bullying is against the rules and can get you in trouble, suspended, or expelled. If someone 
bullies you, or you see someone being bullied, get help by telling an adult. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-514 
A.C.A. § 5-71-217 
Date Adopted: 08/09/2007 Last Revised: 6/30/2013 
 
 
4.45 SMART CORE CURRICULUM FOR THE CLASSES 
OF 2017 
 
 
 
 
All students are required to participate in the Smart Core curriculum unless their parents or guardians, or 
the students if they are 18 years of age or older, sign a Smart Core Waiver Form to not participate. While 
Smart Core is the default option, both a Smart Core Informed Consent Form and a Smart Core Waiver 
Form will be sent home with students prior to their enrolling in seventh grade, or when a 7-12 grade 
student enrolls in the district for the first time and there is not a signed form in the student’s permanent 
record. Parents must sign one of the forms and return it to the school so it can be placed in the students’ 
permanent records. This policy is to be included in student handbooks for grades 6-12 and both students 
and parents must sign an acknowledgement they have received the policy. Those students not 
participating in the Smart Core curriculum will be required to fulfill the Core curriculum or the 
requirements of their IEP (when applicable) to be eligible for graduation. Counseling by trained personnel 
shall be available to students and their parents or legal guardians prior to the time they are required to sign 
the consent forms. 
 
While there are similarities between the two curriculums, following the Core curriculum may not qualify 
students for some scholarships and admission to certain colleges could be jeopardized. Students initially 
choosing the Core curriculum may subsequently change to the Smart Core curriculum providing they 
would be able to complete the required course of study by the end of their senior year.2 Students wishing 
to change their choice of curriculums must consult with their counselor to determine the feasibility of 
changing paths. 
 
This policy, the Smart Core curriculum, and the courses necessary for graduation shall be reviewed by 
staff, students, and parents at least every other year3 to determine if changes need to be made to better 
serve the needs of the district’s students. The superintendent, or his/her designee, shall select the 
composition of the review panel. 
 
Sufficient information relating to Smart Core and the district’s graduation requirements shall be 
communicated to parents and students to ensure their informed understanding of each. This may be 
accomplished through any or all of the following means: 
1. Inclusion in the student handbook of the Smart Core curriculum and graduation requirements; 

2. Discussion of the Smart Core curriculum and graduation requirements at the school’s annual 
public meeting, PTA meetings, or a meeting held specifically for the purpose of informing the 
public on this matter; 
3. Discussions held by the school’s counselors with students and their parents; and/or 
4. Distribution of a newsletter(s) to parents or guardians of the district’s students. 
 
Administrators, or their designees, shall train newly hired employees, required to be licensed as a 
condition of their employment, regarding this policy. The district’s annual professional development shall 
include the training required by this paragraph. 
To the best of its ability, the District shall follow the requirements covering the transfer of course credit 
and graduation set forth in the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children for 
all students who meet the definition of “eligible child” in Policy 4.2—ENROLLMENT. 
 
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 
The number of units students must earn to be eligible for high school graduation is to be earned from the 
categories listed below. A minimum of 22 units is required for graduation for a student participating in 
either the Smart Core or Core curriculum. In addition to the 22 units required for graduation by the 
Arkansas Department of Education, the district requires an additional 2 units to graduate for a total of 24 
units. The additional required units may be taken from any electives offered by the district. There are 
some distinctions made between Smart Core units and Graduation units. Not all units earned toward 
graduation necessarily apply to Smart Core requirements. 
 
SMART CORE: Sixteen (16) units 
English: four (4) units – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th 
 
Oral Communications: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Mathematics: four (4) units (all students under Smart Core must take a mathematics course in grade 11 or 
12 and complete Algebra II.) 
. 1. Algebra I or Algebra A & B* which may be taken in grades 7-8 or 8-9; 
. 2. Geometry or Investigating Geometry or Geometry A & B* which may be taken in grades 8-9 
or 9-10; 
*A two-year algebra equivalent or a two-year geometry equivalent may each be counted as two units of 
the four-unit requirement for the purpose of meeting the graduation requirement, but only serve as one 
unit each toward fulfilling the Smart Core requirement. 
. 3. Algebra II; and 
4. The fourth unit may be either: 
. A math unit beyond Algebra II: this can include Pre-Calculus, Calculus, AP Statistics, 
Algebra III, Advanced Topic and Modeling in Mathematics, Mathematical Applications 
and Algorithms, Linear Systems and Statistics, or any of several IB or Advanced 
Placement math courses (Comparable concurrent credit college courses may be 
substituted where applicable); or 
. one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials of Computer Programming, 
ADE Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP Computer Science 
Principles, IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 
 
Natural Science: a total of three (3) units with lab experience chosen from 
One unit of Biology; and either: 
Two units chosen from the following three categories (there are acceptable options listed by the ADE for 
each): 
. Physical Science; 
. Chemistry; 
. Physics or Principles of Technology I & II or PIC Physics; or 

One unit from the three categories above and one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials 
of Computer Programming, ADE Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP 
Computer Science Principles, IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 
 
Social Studies: three (3) units 
. Civics one-half (½) unit 
. World History - one unit 
. American History - one unit 
 
Physical Education: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Note: While one-half (1/2) unit is required for graduation, no more than one (1) unit may be applied 
toward fulfilling the necessary units to graduate. 
 
Health and Safety: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Economics – one half (½) unit – dependent upon the licensure of the teacher teaching the course, this can 
count toward the required three (3) social studies credits or the six (6) required Career Focus elective 
credits.7 
 
Fine Arts: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
CAREER FOCUS: - Six (6) units 
 All career focus unit requirements shall be established through guidance and counseling based on the 
student’s contemplated work aspirations. Career focus courses shall conform to the curriculum policy of 
the district and reflect state curriculum frameworks through course sequencing and career course 
concentrations where appropriate. 
 
CORE: Sixteen (16) units 
English: four (4) units – 9, 10, 11, and 12 
 
Oral Communications: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Mathematics: four (4) units 
. Algebra or its equivalent* - 1 unit 
. Geometry or its equivalent* - 1 unit 
. All math units must build on the base of algebra and geometry knowledge and skills. 
. (Comparable concurrent credit college courses may be substituted where applicable) 
. one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials of Computer Programming, ADE 
Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP Computer Science Principles, IB 
Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE may be substituted for a math credit 
beyond Algebra I and Geometry 
*A two-year algebra equivalent or a two-year geometry equivalent may each be counted as two units of 
the four (4) unit requirement. 
 
Science: three (3) units 
. at least one (1) unit of biology or its equivalent; and 
Two units chosen from the following three categories: 
. Physical Science; 
. Chemistry; 
. Physics; or 
One unit from the three categories above and one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials 
of Computer Programming, ADE Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP 
Computer Science Principles, IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 

 
Social Studies: three (3) units 
. Civics one-half (1/2) unit 
. World history, one (1) unit 
. American History, one (1) unit 
 
Physical Education: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Note: While one-half (1/2) unit is required for graduation, no more than one (1) unit may be applied 
toward fulfilling the necessary units to graduate. 
 
Health and Safety: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Economics – one half (½) unit – dependent upon the licensure of the teacher teaching the course, this can 
count toward the required three (3) social studies credits or the six (6) required Career Focus elective 
credits. 
 
Fine Arts: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
CAREER FOCUS: - Six (6) units 
 All career focus unit requirements shall be established through guidance and counseling based on the 
student’s contemplated work aspirations. Career focus courses shall conform to the curriculum policy of 
the district and reflect state curriculum frameworks through course sequencing and career course 
concentrations where appropriate. 
Cross Reference: 4.55—STUDENT PROMOTION AND RETENTION 
Legal References: Standards For Accreditation 9.03 – 9.03.1.9, 14.02 
 ADE Guidelines for the Development of Smart Core Curriculum Policy 
 Smart Core Informed Consent Form 
 Smart Core Waiver Form 
Date Adopted: A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
Last Revised: January 2016 
 
4.45.1 SMART CORE CURRICULUM FOR THE CLASS OF 
2018 AND THEREAFTER 
 
 
 
 
All students are required to participate in the Smart Core curriculum unless their parents or guardians, or 
the students if they are 18 years of age or older, sign a Smart Core Waiver Form to not participate. While 
Smart Core is the default option, both a Smart Core Informed Consent Form and a Smart Core Waiver 
Form will be sent home with students prior to their enrolling in seventh grade, or when a 7-12 grade 
student enrolls in the district for the first time and there is not a signed form in the student’s permanent 
record. Parents must sign one of the forms and return it to the school so it can be placed in the students’ 
permanent records. This policy is to be included in student handbooks for grades 6-12 and both students 
and parents must sign an acknowledgement they have received the policy. Those students not 
participating in the Smart Core curriculum will be required to fulfill the Core curriculum or the 
requirements of their IEP (when applicable) to be eligible for graduation. Counseling by trained personnel 
shall be available to students and their parents or legal guardians prior to the time they are required to sign 
the consent forms. 
 
While there are similarities between the two curriculums, following the Core curriculum may not qualify 
students for some scholarships and admission to certain colleges could be jeopardized. Students initially 
choosing the Core curriculum may subsequently change to the Smart Core curriculum providing they 
would be able to complete the required course of study by the end of their senior year.2 Students wishing 
to change their choice of curriculums must consult with their counselor to determine the feasibility of 
changing paths. 
 

This policy, the Smart Core curriculum, and the courses necessary for graduation shall be reviewed by 
staff, students, and parents at least every other year3 to determine if changes need to be made to better 
serve the needs of the district’s students. The superintendent, or his/her designee, shall select the 
composition of the review panel. 
 
Sufficient information relating to Smart Core and the district’s graduation requirements shall be 
communicated to parents and students to ensure their informed understanding of each. This may be 
accomplished through any or all of the following means: 
1. Inclusion in the student handbook of the Smart Core curriculum and graduation requirements; 
2. Discussion of the Smart Core curriculum and graduation requirements at the school’s annual 
public meeting, PTA meetings, or a meeting held specifically for the purpose of informing the 
public on this matter; 
3. Discussions held by the school’s counselors with students and their parents; and/or 
4. Distribution of a newsletter(s) to parents or guardians of the district’s students. 
 
Administrators, or their designees, shall train newly hired employees, required to be licensed as a 
condition of their employment, regarding this policy. The district’s annual professional development shall 
include the training required by this paragraph. 
To the best of its ability, the District shall follow the requirements covering the transfer of course credit 
and graduation set forth in the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children for 
all students who meet the definition of “eligible child” in Policy 4.2—ENROLLMENT. 
 
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 
The number of units students must earn to be eligible for high school graduation is to be earned from the 
categories listed below. A minimum of 22 units is required for graduation for a student participating in 
either the Smart Core or Core curriculum. In addition to the 22 units required for graduation by the 
Arkansas 
 
Department of Education, the district requires an additional 2 units to graduate for a total of 24 units. The 
additional required units may be taken from any electives offered by the district. There are some 
distinctions made between Smart Core units and Graduation units. Not all units earned toward graduation 
necessarily apply to Smart Core requirements. 
 
Digital Learning Courses 
 
The District shall offer one or more digital learning course(s) through one or more District approved 
provider(s) as either a primary or supplementary method of instruction. The courses may be in a blended 
learning, online-based, or other technology-based format.7 In addition to the other graduation 
requirements contained in this policy, students are required to take at least one (1) digital learning course 
for credit while in high school. 
 
SMART CORE: Sixteen (16) units 
English: four (4) units – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th 
 
Oral Communications: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Mathematics: four (4) units (all students under Smart Core must take a mathematics course in grade 11 or 
12 and complete Algebra II.) 
. 1. Algebra I or Algebra A & B* which may be taken in grades 7-8 or 8-9; 
. 2. Geometry or Investigating Geometry or Geometry A & B* which may be taken in grades 8-9 
or 9-10; 
*A two-year algebra equivalent or a two-year geometry equivalent may each be counted as two units of 
the four-unit requirement for the purpose of meeting the graduation requirement, but only serve as one 
unit each toward fulfilling the Smart Core requirement. 

. 3. Algebra II; and 
. 4. The fourth unit may be either: 
. A math unit beyond Algebra II: this can include Pre-Calculus, Calculus, AP Statistics, 
Algebra III, Advanced Topic and Modeling in Mathematics, Mathematical Applications and 
Algorithms, Linear Systems and Statistics, or any of several IB or Advanced Placement math 
courses (Comparable concurrent credit college courses may be substituted where applicable); 
or 
. one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials of Computer Programming, ADE 
Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP Computer Science Principles 
,IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 
 
Natural Science: a total of three (3) units with lab experience chosen from 
One unit of Biology; and either: 
 Two units chosen from the following three categories (there are acceptable options listed by the ADE for 
each): 
. Physical Science; 
. Chemistry; 
. Physics or Principles of Technology I & II or PIC Physics; or 
One unit from the three categories above and one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials 
of Computer Programming, ADE Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP 
Computer Science Principles, IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 
 
Social Studies: three (3) units 
. Civics one-half (½) unit 
. World History - one unit 
. American History - one unit 
 
Physical Education: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Note: While one-half (1/2) unit is required for graduation, no more than one (1) unit may be applied 
toward fulfilling the necessary units to graduate. 
 
Health and Safety: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Economics – one half (½) unit – dependent upon the licensure of the teacher teaching the course, this can 
count toward the required three (3) social studies credits or the six (6) required Career Focus elective 
credits.8 
 
Fine Arts: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
CAREER FOCUS: - Six (6) units 
 All career focus unit requirements shall be established through guidance and counseling based on the 
student’s contemplated work aspirations. Career focus courses shall conform to the curriculum policy of 
the district and reflect state curriculum frameworks through course sequencing and career course 
concentrations where appropriate. 
 
CORE: Sixteen (16) units 
 
English: four (4) units – 9, 10, 11, and 12 
 
Oral Communications: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Mathematics: four (4) units 
. Algebra or its equivalent* - 1 unit 

. Geometry or its equivalent* - 1 unit 
. All math units must build on the base of algebra and geometry knowledge and skills. 
. (Comparable concurrent credit college courses may be substituted where applicable) 
. one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials of Computer Programming, ADE 
Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP Computer Science Principles, IB 
Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE may be substituted for a math credit 
beyond Algebra I and Geometry 
*A two-year algebra equivalent or a two-year geometry equivalent may each be counted as two units of 
the four (4) unit requirement. 
 
Science: three (3) units 
. at least one (1) unit of biology or its equivalent; and 
Two units chosen from the following three categories: 
. Physical Science; 
. Chemistry; 
. Physics; or 
One unit from the three categories above and one unit of computer science chosen from ADE Essentials 
of Computer Programming, ADE Computer Science and Mathematics, AP Computer Science, AP 
Computer Science Principles ,IB Computer Science, or other options approved by ADE. 
 
Social Studies: three (3) units 
. Civics one-half (1/2) unit 
. World history, one (1) unit 
. American History, one (1) unit 
 
Physical Education: one-half (1/2) unit 
Note: While one-half (1/2) unit is required for graduation, no more than one (1) unit may be applied 
toward fulfilling the necessary units to graduate. 
 
Health and Safety: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
Economics – one half (½) unit – dependent upon the licensure of the teacher teaching the course, this can 
count toward the required three (3) social studies credits or the six (6) required Career Focus elective 
credits. 
 
Fine Arts: one-half (1/2) unit 
 
CAREER FOCUS: - Six (6) units 
 All career focus unit requirements shall be established through guidance and counseling based on the 
student’s contemplated work aspirations. Career focus courses shall conform to the curriculum policy of 
the district and reflect state curriculum frameworks through course sequencing and career course 
concentrations where appropriate. 
Cross References: 4.55—STUDENT PROMOTION AND RETENTION 
5.11—DIGITAL LEARNING COURSES 
Legal References: Standards For Accreditation 9.03 – 9.03.1.9, 14.02 
 ADE Guidelines for the Development of Smart Core Curriculum Policy 
 ADE Rules Governing the Digital Learning Act of 2013 
 Smart Core Informed Consent Form 2016 
 Smart Core Waiver Form 2016 
 A.C.A. § 6-16-1406 
A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 Advanced Placement Classes 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year our school will offer Pre-AP classes in the curriculum for 
the 7th and 8th grades. Previously we offered honors courses. While both classes are rigorous and 
challenging, this change will line up our 7th and 8th grade classes with the pre-AP and AP classes 
that are taught at the high school. Students will be given ten (10) school days to transfer from a pre-
AP class to a regular class. After the 10th day of school the student will remain enrolled in the pre-AP 
class for the remainder of the semester. 
 
 
4.46 – PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 
 
 
 
The Pledge of Allegiance shall be recited during the morning announcements each school day. Those students 
choosing to participate shall do so by facing the flag with their right hands over their hearts, or in an appropriate 
salute if in uniform, while reciting the Pledge. Students choosing not to participate shall be quiet while either 
standing or sitting. 
 
Students shall not be compelled to recite the Pledge, but students who choose not to recite the Pledge shall not 
disrupt those students choosing to recite the Pledge. 
 
Students choosing not to recite the Pledge shall not be subject to any comments, retaliation, or disciplinary action. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-16-108 
Date Adopted: 11/10/2005 
Last Revised: 
 
4.47— POSSESSION AND USE OF CELL PHONES & OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES 
 
 
 
 
Drew Central Middle School assumes no responsibility for loss or recovery of missing cell 
phones or any electronic device. 
 
Students are responsible for conducting themselves in a manner that respects the rights of others. 
Possession and use of any electronic device, whether district or student owned, that interferes with a 
positive, orderly classroom environment does not respect the rights of others and is expressly forbidden. 
 
To protect the security of state originated tests that are administered as part of the Arkansas 
Comprehensive, Testing, Assessment and Accountability Program (ACTAAP), no electronic, device as 
defined in this policy shall be accessible by a student at any time during test administration unless 
specifically permitted by a student's IEP or individual health plan,. This means that when a student is 
taking an ACTAAP assessment, the student shall not have his/her electronic device in his/her possession. 
Any student violating this provision shall be subject to this policy's disciplinary provisions. 
 
As used in this policy, “electronic devices” means anything that can be used to transmit or capture 
images, sound, or data. 
 
Misuse of electronic devices includes, but is not limited to: 
1. Using electronic devices during class time in any manner other than specifically permitted by the 
classroom instructor; 
2. Permitting any audible sound to come from the device when not being used for reason #1 above; 
3. Engaging in academic dishonesty, including cheating, intentionally plagiarizing, wrongfully giving or 
receiving help during an academic examination, or wrongfully obtaining test copies or scores; 
4. Using the device to take photographs in locker rooms or bathrooms; 

5. Creating, sending, sharing, viewing, receiving, or possessing an indecent visual depiction of oneself 
or another person. 
 
Use of an electronic device is permitted to the extent it is approved in a student’s individualized education 
program (IEP) or it is needed in an emergency that threatens the safety of students, staff, or other 
individuals. 
 
Before and after normal school hours, possession of electronic devices is permitted on the school campus. 
The use of such devices at school sponsored functions outside the regular school day is permitted to the 
extent and within the limitations allowed by the event or activity the student is attending. 
 
The student and/or the student’s parents or guardians expressly assume any risk associated with students 
owning or possessing electronic devices. Students misusing electronic devices shall have them 
confiscated. Confiscated devices may be picked up at the school’s administration office by the student’s 
parents or guardians.2 Students have no right of privacy as to the content contained on any electronic 
devices that have been confiscated.3 A search of a confiscated device shall meet the reasonable 
individualized suspicion requirements of Policy 4.32—SEARCH, SEIZURE, AND 
INTERROGATIONS. 
 
Students who use school issued cell phones and/or computers for non-school purposes, except as 
permitted by the district’s Internet/computer use policy, shall be subject to discipline, up to and including 
suspension or expulsion. Students are forbidden from using school issued cell phones while driving any 
vehicle at any time. Violation may result in disciplinary action up to and including expulsion.4 
 
No student shall use any wireless communication device for the purposes of browsing the internet; 
composing or reading emails and text messages; or making or answering phone calls while driving a 
motor vehicle which is in motion and on school property. Violation may result in disciplinary action up to 
and including suspension. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-515 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1602 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1603 
A.C.A. § 27-51-1609 
ADE Test Administration Manual 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: January 2016 
 
Violation of the cell phone policy will result in: 
1st offense: Warning. The cell phone will be confiscated and brought to the office as soon as 
possible. The parent must pick the phone up by the end of the school day. If the parent cannot pick 
the phone up at the end of the school day, the student may pick it up at the end of the following 
school day. 
2nd offense: Three (3) days of detention hall. The cell phone will be confiscated and brought to the 
office as soon as possible. The parent must pick the phone up at the end of the school day from the 
office. 
3rd offense: Five (5) days of detention hall. The cell phone will be confiscated and brought to the 
office as soon as possible. The parent must pick the phone up at the end of the school day from the 
office. 
4th offense: In-School Suspension. The cell phone will be confiscated and brought to the office as 
soon as possible. The parent must pick the phone up at the end of the school day from the office. 
5th offense: The cell phone will be banned for the rest of the semester or other disciplinary action. 
NOTE: If the student refuses to relinquish the electronic device when asked by faculty, staff, or 
administration, this will be considered insubordination. 
 
 

 
4.48 – VIDEO SURVEILLANCE & OTHER STUDENT MONITORING 
 
 
 
 
The Board of Directors has a responsibility to maintain discipline, protect the safety, security, and welfare 
of its students, staff, and visitors while at the same time safeguarding district facilities, vehicles, and 
equipment. As part of fulfilling this responsibility, the board authorizes the use of video/audio 
surveillance cameras, automatic identification technology, data compilation devices, and technology 
capable of tracking the physical location of district equipment, students, and/or personnel. 
 
The placement of video/audio surveillance cameras shall be based on the presumption and belief that 
students, staff and visitors have no reasonable expectation of privacy anywhere on or near school 
property, facilities, vehicles, or equipment, with the exception of places such as rest rooms or dressing 
areas where an expectation of bodily privacy is reasonable and customary. 
 
Signs shall be posted on campus buildings and in district vehicles to notify students, staff, and visitors 
that video cameras may be in use. Parents and students shall also be notified through the student 
handbook that cameras may be in use in school buildings, on school grounds and in school vehicles. 
Students will be held responsible for any violations of school discipline rules caught by the cameras and 
other technologies authorized in this policy. 
 
The district shall retain copies of video recordings until they are erased. This may be accomplished by 
either deletion or copying over with a new recording. Other than video recordings being retained under 
the provisions of this policy’s following paragraph, the district’s video recordings may be erased any time 
greater than one (1) day after they were created. 
 
Videos, automatic identification, or data compilations containing evidence of a violation of student 
conduct rules and/or state or federal law shall be retained until the issue of the misconduct is no longer 
subject to review or appeal as determined by board policy or student handbook; any release or viewing of 
such records shall be in accordance with current law. 
 
Students who vandalize, damage, disable, or render inoperable (temporarily or permanently) surveillance 
cameras and equipment, automatic identification, or data compilation devices shall be subject to 
appropriate disciplinary action and referral to appropriate law enforcement authorities. 
Legal References: 20 USC 1232(g) 
 20 U.S.C. 7115 
 34 CFR 99.3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 31 
Date Adopted: 08/12/2010 Last Revised: 3/20/14 
 
 
4.49 – SPECIAL EDUCATION 
 
 
The district shall provide a free appropriate public education and necessary related services to all children with 
disabilities residing within the district, required under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”), 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act, and Arkansas Statutes. 
 
It is the intent of the district to ensure that students who are disabled within the definition of Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are identified, evaluated and provided with appropriate educational services. Students 
may be disabled within the meaning of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act even though they do not require 
services pursuant to the IDEA. 
 
For students eligible for services under IDEA, the District shall follow procedures for identification, evaluation, 
placement, and delivery of services to children with disabilities provided in state and federal statutes which govern 
special education. Implementation of an Individualized Education Program (IEP) in accordance with the IDEA 
satisfies the district's obligation to provide a free and appropriate education under Section 504. 
 

The Board directs the superintendent to ensure procedures are in place for the implementation of special education 
services and that programs are developed to conform to the requirements of state and federal legislation. The 
superintendent is responsible for appointing a district coordinator for overseeing district fulfillment of its 
responsibilities regarding handicapped students. Among the coordinator’s responsibilities shall be ensuring district 
enforcement of the due process rights of handicapped students and their parents. 
 
Students served in the Special Education Program must qualify under PL94-142 (105-17 IDEA as 
amended). Prior to a special education referral, the student needs to have received Response to 
Intervention (RTI) services. The Response to Intervention Committee consists of grade level teachers, 
counselor, parent and building principal. The team suggests intervention strategies for the teacher to try 
with the student. The child has a vision and hearing screening to rule out any difficulties with these areas 
as the first strategy. The team meets to review the progress of the student and to determine if the student 
should be referred for special education services. A parent or any person having knowledge of a child can 
make a referral for special education services. When a student is referred for testing, a conference is held 
to explain the reasons for the referral, parent/student rights, and the testing procedure. After the parent or 
guardian gives permission, the student is evaluated and those results assist in determining whether the 
child qualifies for special education services. Once the assessments are completed, an evaluation 
conference is held with the parent/guardian and educational committee to discuss the results and 
placement of the student if indicated. Contact Dawn Campagna, LEA Supervisor or Jessica McKay and 
April Cruce Special Education Teachers at 367-6893 for more information. 
Legal References: 34 C.F.R. 300 et seq. 
42 U.S.C. §12101 et seq. American with Disabilities Act 
29 U.S.C. § 794 Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, 
 20 U.S.C. §1400 et seq. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 
 P.L. 108-446 The 2004 Reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Act 
 A.C.A. § 6-41-201 et seq. 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: 08/14/2008 
 
 
DISCIPLINE FOR THE DISABLED 
 
 
 
Discipline procedures for students with disabilities in the Drew Central District shall be conducted in 
compliance with the student’s IEP which conforms to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
(IDEA), which meets the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Other specific clarification follows: 
1. To the extent removal from school would be applied to students without disabilities, the same 
shall apply to the removal of a student with a disability for not more than 10 school days for any 
violation of school rules. During this time of removal, the school is not required to provide 
educational services. 
2. If removal for more than 10 days is recommended, procedures outlined in the IDEA federal and 
state regulations shall be implemented. 
3. When a student with a disability is removed from school, written notice shall be sent to the office 
of the Special Education Supervisor. 
4. The Drew Central District designates a grievance officer for students who qualify under Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 
 
 
DUE PROCESS 
 
 
 
The due process right of students and parents at Drew Central Schools is as follows: 
1. Prior to any suspension, the school principal or his/her designee, shall advise the pupil in question 
of the particular misconduct of which he or she is accused, as well as the basis for such 
accusation. 
2. The pupil shall be given an opportunity at that time to explain his/her version of the facts to the 
school principal or his/her designee. 

3. Written notice of suspension and the reason (s) for the suspension shall be given to the parent(s) 
of the pupil. 
4. Any parent(s), or legal guardian of a pupil or students having a grievance shall have the right to 
appeal to the superintendent of schools. If they are dissatisfied with the superintendent’s 
decision, they can appeal to the Drew Central School Board within 5 days by writing to President, 
Drew Central School Board, 250 University Drive, Monticello, AR 71655. 
 
 
504 ELIGIBIITY 
 
 
Section 504 status applies to students with disabilities. The student may be considered disabled if he/she 
has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities. 
Examples of such disabilities are temporary disabling conditions such as an accident or injury requiring 
the student’s extended absence from school, communicable diseases, attention deficit disorder, behavior 
disorders, chronic asthma or severe allergies, physical disabilities, and diabetes. Upon evaluation and 
recommendation, reasonable accommodations in the student’s instructional program and services are 
provided. Contact Joy Graham, 504 Coordinator, at 367-5369 for more information. 
 
 
4.50 – SCHOOL LUNCH SUBSTITUTIONS 
 
 
The district only provides substitute meal components on menus to accommodate students with 
handicapping conditions meeting the definition of a disability as defined in USDA regulations. A 
parent/guardian wishing to request such a dietary accommodation must submit to the district’s Director of 
Child Nutrition1 Tiffany Barnard a Certification of Disability for Special Dietary Needs Form completed 
by: 
. Physicians, including those licensed by: 
o The Arkansas State Medical Board; 
o The Arkansas State Board of Chiropractic Examiners (Chiropractors); 
o The Arkansas Board of Podiatric Medicine (Podiatrists); 
. Nurse Practitioners (APRNs in family or pediatric practice with prescriptive authority); 
. Physician Assistants (PAs who work in collaborative practice with a physician); and 
. Dentists. 
 
The district will not prepare meals outside the normal menu to accommodate a family’s religious or 
personal health beliefs. 
Legal References: Commissioner’s Memo FIN-09-044 
 7 CFR 210.10(g) 
Commissioner’s Memo FIN-15-122 
Date Adopted: 07/16/2009 Last Revised: January 2016 
 
 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FOOD & BEVERAGES IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 
ACT 1220 OF 2003 
 
 
 
 
Access to Foods and Beverages in Public Schools 
1. Middle school students will not have access to vended food and beverages anytime, anywhere on 
school premises during the declared school day. 
2. Effective July 1, 2005, during the declared school day, a middle school school site may not serve, 
provide access to, through direct or indirect sales, or use as a reward, any Foods of Minimal 
Nutritional Value (FMNV) or competitive food. This includes FMNV and competitive foods 
given, sold or provided by school administrators, or staff (principals, coaches, teachers, club 
sponsors, etc.) students or student groups, parents or parent groups, or any other person, company 
or organization associated with the school site. 

3. In middle schools, the Child Nutrition Program may only sell food items in the cafeteria, during 
meal periods that are already offered as a component of a reimbursable meal during the school 
year, including extra milk, fresh fruits, vegetables, and/or an extra meal meeting the same 
requirements of the reimbursable meal. School food service departments shall not sell or give 
extra servings of desserts, French fries and/or ice cream. 
 
Exceptions to Limiting Access to Food and Beverages in All Schools 
 
1. There will be nine designated snack days in each school year. 
2. Parents Rights - This policy does not restrict what parents may provide for their own child’s 
lunch or snacks. Parents may provide FMNV or candy items for their own child’s consumption, 
but they may not provide restricted items to other children at school. 
3. School Nurses - This policy does not apply to school nurses using FMNVs or candy during the 
course of providing health care to individual students. 
 
Competitive Foods and Beverages 
The District is committed to ensuring that all foods and beverages available to students on the school 
campus* during the declared school day* support healthy eating. The declared school day is defined as 
the period from midnight before, to 30 minutes after the end of the official school day. 
 
The foods and beverages sold and served outside of the school meal programs (i.e., “competitive” foods 
and beverages) will meet the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards, at a minimum. Smart 
Snacks aim to improve student health and well-being, increase consumption of healthful foods during the 
school day, and create an environment that reinforces the development of healthy eating habits. 
To support healthy food choices and improve student health and well-being, all foods and beverages 
outside the reimbursable school meal programs that are sold to students on the school campus during the 
school day will meet or exceed the USDA Smart Snacks nutrition standards. These standards will apply 
in all locations and through all services where foods and beverages are sold, which may include, but are 
not limited to, a la carte options in cafeterias, vending machines, school stores, and snack or food carts. 
The District will enforce the following rules set by the Arkansas Department of Education Child Nutrition 
Unit. 
. Elementary students will not have access to vended food and beverages anytime, anywhere on 
school premises during the declared school day. 
. During the declared school day, an elementary school site may not serve, provide access to, 
through direct or indirect sales, or use as a reward, any FMNV or competitive food. This includes 
FMNV and competitive foods given, sold, or provided by school administrators, or staff 
(principals, coaches, teachers, club sponsors, etc.) students or student groups, parents or parent 
groups, or any other person, company or organization associated with the school site. Exceptions 
to this requirement are listed below. 
. In elementary schools, the Child Nutrition Program may only sell food items in the cafeteria, 
during meal periods that are already offered as a component of a reimbursable meal during the 
school year, including extra milk, fresh fruits, vegetables, and/or an extra meal meeting the same 
requirements of the reimbursable meal. School food service departments shall not sell or give 
extra servings of desserts, french fries and/or ice cream. 
. During the declared school day, at middle, junior high and high school sites, schools shall not 
serve, provide access to, through direct or indirect sales, or use as a reward, any FMNV or 
competitive food to students anywhere on school premises until thirty (30) minutes after the last 
lunch period has ended. This includes FMNV and competitive foods given, sold or provided by 
school administrators, or staff (principals, coaches, teachers, club sponsors, etc.) students or 
student groups, parents or parent groups, or any other person, company or organization 
associated with the school site. 
. In middle, junior high, and high schools, the Child Nutrition Program may only sell food items in 
the cafeteria, during meal periods that are already offered as a component of a reimbursable 
meal during the school year, including extra milk, fresh fruits, vegetables, unsweetened 
unflavored water, and/or other food/beverage items that meet standards of maximum portion size 
and/or an extra meal meeting the same requirements of the reimbursable meal. 
 

 
Exceptions to these rules: 
. Parents Rights - This policy does not restrict what parents may provide for their own child’s lunch 
or snacks. Parents may provide FMNV or candy items for their own child’s consumption, but they 
may not provide restricted items to other children at school. 
. School Nurses - This policy does not apply to school nurses using FMNVs or candy during the 
course of providing health care to individual students. 
. Special Needs Students – This policy does not apply to special needs students whose 
Individualized Education Program (IEP) plan indicates the use of an FMNV or candy for behavior 
modification (or other suitable need). 
. School Events - Students may be given any food and/or beverage items during the school day for 
up to nine different events each school year to be determined and approved by school officials. 
These items may not be given during meal times in the areas where school meals are being 
served or consumed. 
. Snacks During the Declared School Day – Snacks may be provided or distributed by the school 
as part of the planned instructional program, for example, afternoon snack for kindergarten 
students who eat early lunch. Snacks shall meet the United States Department of Agriculture 
Child and Adult Care Snack Patterns. 
. Foods for Instructional Purposes – Foods integrated as a vital part of the instructional program 
are allowed at any time. Examples include edible manipulatives such as a square of cheese to 
teach fractions, a nutrition food experience, food production in family and consumer science units, 
and food science units. 
 
. Celebrations and Rewards 
All foods offered on the school campus will meet or exceed the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition 
standards including through: 
1. Celebrations and parties. The district will provide a list of healthy party ideas to parents and teachers, 
including non-food celebration ideas. Healthy party ideas from the Alliance for a Healthier Generationand 
from the USDA. 
2. Classroom snacks brought by parents. The District will provide to parents a list of foods and beverages 
that meet Smart Snacks nutrition standards; and 
Rewards and incentives. The District will provide teachers and other relevant school staff a list of 
alternative ways to reward children. Foods and beverages will not be used as a reward, or withheld as 
punishment for any reason, such as for performance or behavior. 
 
 
CAFETERIA POLICY 
 
 
The cafeteria is operated for the benefit of the students. It is hoped that as many as possible will 
take advantage of this service. In order to meet nutritional requirements of the students a well-
balanced breakfast and lunch is available daily. Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year all 
students will have the choice of eating breakfast and lunch at no cost to their parents or 
guardians. It is our hope that all students will take advantage of this unique opportunity. 
 
 
4.52 – STUDENTS WHO ARE FOSTER 
CHILDREN 
 
 
The District will afford the same services and educational opportunities to foster children that are 
afforded other children and youth. The District shall work with the Department of Human Services 
(“DHS”), the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE), and individuals involved with each foster child 
to ensure that he/she is able to maintain his/her continuity of educational services to the fullest extent that 
is practical and reasonable. 
 
The Superintendent or his/her designee shall appoint an appropriate staff person to be the local 
educational liaison for foster children and youth whose responsibilities shall include ensuring the timely 

school enrollment of each foster child and assisting foster children who transfer between schools by 
expediting the transfer of relevant educational records.1 
 
The District, working with other individuals and agencies shall, unless the presiding court rules otherwise, 
ensure that the foster child remains in his/her school of origin, even if a change in the foster child’s 
placement results in a residency that is outside the district. In such a situation, the District will work with 
DHS to arrange for transportation to and from school for the foster child to the extent it is reasonable and 
practical. 
 
Upon notification to the District’s foster care liaison by a foster child’s caseworker that a foster child’s 
school enrollment is being changed to one of the District’s schools, the school receiving the child must 
immediately enroll him/her. Immediate enrollment is required even if a child lacks the required clothing, 
academic or medical records, or proof of residency. 
 
A foster child’s grades shall not be lowered due to absence from school that is caused by a change in the 
child’s school enrollment, the child’s attendance at dependency-neglect court proceedings, or other court-
ordered counseling or treatment. 
 
Any course work completed by the foster child prior to a school enrollment change shall be accepted as 
academic credit so long as the child has satisfactorily completed the appropriate academic placement 
assessment. 
 
If a foster child was enrolled in a District school immediately prior to completing his/her graduation 
requirements while detained in a juvenile detention facility or while committed to the Division of Youth 
Services of DHS, the District shall issue the child a diploma. 
Cross References: 4.1—RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 
 4.2—ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 4.7—ABSENCES 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 9-28-113 
Date Adopted: June 30, 2001 Last Revised: April 17, 2015 
 
4.53 – PLACEMENT OF MULTIPLE BIRTH SIBLINGS 
 
 
 
The parent, guardian or other person having charge or custody of multiple birth siblings in grades pre-K through 6 
may request that the multiple birth siblings are placed in either the same or separate classrooms. The request shall be 
in writing not later than the 14th calendar day prior to the first day of classes at the beginning of the academic year. 
The school shall honor the request unless it would require the school to add an additional class to the sibling’s grade 
level. If one parent of multiple birth siblings requests a placement that differs from that of the other parent of the 
same multiple birth siblings, the school shall determine the appropriate placement of the siblings. 
 
The school may change the classroom placement of one or more of the multiple birth siblings if: 
1. There have been a minimum of 30 instructional days since the start of the school year; and 
a. After consulting with each classroom teacher in which the siblings were placed, the school 
determines the parent’s classroom placement request is: 
i. Detrimental to the educational achievement of one or more of the siblings; 
ii. Disruptive to the siblings’ assigned classroom learning environment; or 
iii. Disruptive to the school’s educational or disciplinary environment. 




 
If a parent believes the school has not followed the requirements of this policy, the parent may appeal the multiple 
birth siblings’ classroom placement to the Superintendent. The Superintendent’s decision regarding the appeal shall 
be final. 
Legal Reference: A.C.A. § 6-18-106 
Date Adopted: 6/30/2011 Last Revised: 
 
 

 
4.54 – STUDENT ACCELERATION 
 
 
The Board believes that acceleration is an effective and research-based intervention for the academic 
growth of students who are ready for an advanced or faster-paced curriculum. It can allow a student to 
move through the traditional educational setting more rapidly, based on assessed readiness, capability and 
motivation. At the same time, the Board understands that acceleration is not a replacement for gifted 
education services or programs. 
 
Generally, acceleration can occur through one of two broad categories: content based and grade based. 
Grade based acceleration shortens the number of years a student would otherwise spend in K-12 
education, while content based acceleration occurs within the normal K-12 time span. Either form of 
acceleration can be triggered by either a parent/guardian, student, or community member's request or by 
the referral of school personnel. In either case, the process of determining the appropriateness of the 
request shall be under the direction of the district/school Gifted and Talented Program Coordinator who 
shall convene the individuals necessary to make an informed decision which shall include the student's 
parents or guardians. 
 
While the needs of the student should dictate when acceleration decisions are considered, the Board 
believes the optimal time for referrals is in the spring which gives adequate time for working through the 
determination process and for preparing those concerned for a smooth transition to the acceleration 
beginning in the following school-year. 
 
The District's Gifted and Talented Program Coordinator will create a written format to govern the referral 
and determination process which shall be made available to any parent or staff member upon request. 
 
The parents/guardians of any student whose request for acceleration has been denied may appeal the 
decision, in writing to the District's GT Coordinator. The Districts GT Coordinator and the Acceleration 
Placement Committee will again thoroughly review the case study that was completed on the student. 
Upon completion of the review, the Committee will either request additional new testing be conducted to 
help the Committee make its determination or it will uphold the initial decision. The Committee's 
decision may not be further appealed. 
Legal Reference: ADE Gifted and Talented Rules 
Date adopted: Last Revised: 1-1-13 
 
 
4.55 – STUDENT PROMOTION & RETENTION 
 
 
A disservice is done to students through social promotion and is prohibited by state law. The District shall, at a 
minimum, evaluate each student annually in an effort to help each student who is not performing at grade level. 
Parents or guardians shall be kept informed concerning the progress of their student(s). Notice of a student’s 
possible retention or required retaking of a course shall be included with the student’s grades sent home to each 
parent/guardian or the student if 18 or older. Parent-teacher conferences are encouraged and may be held as 
necessary in an effort to improve a student’s academic success. 
 
Any grades, course credits, and/or promotions received by a student while enrolled in the Division of Youth 
Services system of education shall be considered transferable in the same manner as those grades, course credits, 
and promotions from other accredited Arkansas public educational entities. 
 
Promotion or retention of students, or their required retaking of a course shall be primarily based on the following 
criteria. If there is doubt concerning the promotion or retention of a student or his/her required retaking of a course, a 
conference shall be held before a final decision is made that includes the following individuals.: 
a) The building principal or designee; 
b) The student’s teacher(s); 
c) School counselor 

d) A 504/special education representative (if applicable); and 
e) The student’s parents. 
 
Other criteria for retention are: 
. Student has a failing grade (59% or below) in reading, writing skills, and or math, or is significantly below 
grade level. 
. Teacher recommendation based on failing grades (59% or lower). For the year in two or more subjects. 
. Failing in three (3) subjects. 
 
The conference shall be held at a time and place that best accommodates those participating in the conference. The 
school shall document participation or non-participation in required conferences. If the conference attendees fail to 
agree concerning the student’s placement or receipt of course credit, the final decision shall rest with the principal or 
the principal’s designee. 
 
Regardless of the student having earned passing grades, a student who falls under one of the following categories 
shall be considered for retention or shall not receive credit for the course associated with the applicable assessment. 
The student: 
. Does not take the State mandated assessment for the student’s grade level or course within the time frame 
specified by the State; 
. Takes the State mandated assessment but does not put forth a good faith effort on the assessment as determined 
by the assessment administrator/proctor. 
 
The Superintendent or designee may wave this provision when the student’s failure was due to exceptional or 
extraordinary circumstances. 
 
Students who do not score proficient or above on their grade level State assessments shall be required to participate 
in an Academic Improvement Plan (AIP). Each AIP shall be developed by school personnel and the student’s 
parents and shall be designed to assist the student in attaining the expected achievement level. The AIP shall also 
state the parent’s role as well as the consequences for the student’s failure to participate in the plan, which shall 
include the student’s retention in their present grade. 
 
All students must successfully pass all end-of-course (EOC) assessments they are required to take unless exempted 
by the student’s individualized education program (IEP). To receive academic credit on his/her transcript in a course 
requiring a student to take a EOC assessment, the student must either receive a passing score on the initial 
assessment or successfully participate in the remediation program identified in his/her individualized Academic 
Improvement Plan (AIP), which shall focus on the areas in which the student failed to meet the necessary passing 
score. Additionally, the lack of credit could jeopardize the student's grade promotion or classification.5 
 
To the extent required by the State Board of Education, students in grade eleven (11) and below who do not meet 
the required score on a college and career readiness measurement shall participate in the remediation activities 
prescribed in his/her AIP which may include additional opportunities to retake the measurement. Such remediation 
shall not require the student to pass a subsequent college and career readiness measurement in order to graduate 
from high school.5 
 
Promotion/retention or graduation of students with an IEP shall be based on their successful attainment of the goals 
set forth in their IEP. 
 
In addition to the possibility of retention or withholding of course credit, students who either refuse to sit for a State 
assessment or attempt to boycott a State assessment by failing to put forth a good faith effort on the assessment as 
determined by the assessment administrator/proctor, or whose parents do not send their student to school on the 
dates the assessments are originally administered or scheduled as make-up days shall not be permitted to participate 
in any non-curriculum related extracurricular activity, including school dances, prom, homecoming, senior events, 
and may be prevented from walking or participating in graduation exercises. The student shall remain ineligible to 
participate until the student takes the same or a following State mandated assessment, as applicable, or completes the 

required remediation for the assessment the student failed to put forth a good faith effort on. The Superintendent or 
designee may wave this paragraph's provisions when the student’s failure was due to exceptional or extraordinary 
circumstances. Students falling under the provisions of this paragraph shall be permitted to attend curriculum related 
field trips occurring during the school day. 
Cross References: 3.30—PARENT-TEACHER COMMUNICATION 
4.56—EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES - SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
4.56.1—EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES - ELEMENTARY 
Legal References: A.C.A. 6-15-433 
A.C.A. § 6-15-2001 
A.C.A. § 6-15-2005 
A.C.A. § 6-15-2009 
A.C.A. § 9-28-205 
ADE Rules Governing the Arkansas Comprehensive Testing, Assessment, and Accountability Program and the Academic 
Distress Program 
ADE Rules Governing Public School End-Of-Course Assessments and Remediation 
Murphy v. State of Ark., 852 F.2d 1039 (8th Cir. 1988) 
Date Adopted: October 12, 2005 Last Revised: April 17, 2015 
 
4.56 – EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 
 
 
 
Definitions 
“Extracurricular activities” are defined as: any school sponsored program where students from one or 
more schools meet, work, perform, practice under supervision outside of regular class time, or are 
competing for the purpose of receiving an award, rating, recognition, or criticism, or qualification for 
additional competition. Examples include, but are not limited to, inter/intra-scholastic athletics, 
cheerleading, band, choral, math, or science competitions, field trips, and club activities. 
 
“Field Trips” are when individual students or groups of students are invited to programs or events when 
there is no competition and the students are not interacting with each other for the purpose of planning, 
qualifying, or arranging for future programs or for the purpose of receiving recognition. 
 
“Interscholastic Activities” means athletic or non-athletic/academic activities where students compete on 
a school vs. school basis. 
 
“Intra-scholastic Activities” means athletic or non-athletic/academic activities where students compete 
with students from within the same school. 
 
Extracurricular Eligibility 
The Board believes in providing opportunities for students to participate in extracurricular activities that 
can help enrich the student’s educational experience. At the same time, the Board believes that a student’s 
participation in extracurricular activities cannot come at the expense of his/her classroom academic 
achievement. Interruptions of instructional time in the classroom are to be minimal and absences from 
class to participate in extracurricular activities shall not exceed one per week per extracurricular activity 
(tournaments or other similar events excepted with approval of the superintendent or designee). All 
students are eligible for extracurricular activities unless specifically denied eligibility on the basis of 
criteria outlined in this policy. 
 
A student may lose his/her eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities when, in the opinion of the 
school’s administration, the student’s participation in such an activity may adversely jeopardize his/her 
academic achievement. Students may also be denied permission to participate in extracurricular activities 
as a consequence of disciplinary action taken by the administration for inappropriate behavior. 
 
Any student who refuses to sit for a State assessment or attempts to boycott a State assessment by failing 
to put forth a good faith effort on the assessment as determined by the assessment administrator/proctor, 
or whose parents do not send their student to school on the dates the assessments are administered or 
scheduled as make-up days shall not be permitted to participate in any non-curriculum related 
extracurricular activity. The student shall remain ineligible to participate until the student takes the same 

or a following state mandated assessment, as applicable, or completes the required remediation for the 
assessment the student failed to put forth a good faith effort on. The superintendent or designee may wave 
this paragraph's provisions when the student’s failure was due to exceptional or extraordinary 
circumstances. Students falling under the provisions of this paragraph shall be permitted to attend 
curriculum related field trips occurring during the school day. 
 
A student who enrolls in the district and meets the definition of “eligible child” in Policy 4.2—
ENROLLMENT shall be eligible to tryout for an extracurricular activity regardless of the date the student 
enrolls in the District so long as the student meets all other eligibility requirements and the extracurricular 
activity is still ongoing. 
Cross References: 4.55—STUDENT PROMOTION AND RETENTION 
4.56—EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES – SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
Legal Reference: State Board of Education Standards for Accreditation 10.05 and 10.06 
A.C.A. § 6-4-302 
Date Adopted: Last Revised: January 2016 
 
Definitions: 
Extracurricular activities are defined as: any school sponsored program where students from one or 
more schools meet, work, perform, practice under supervision outside of regular class time, or are 
competing for the purpose of receiving an award, rating, recognition, or criticism, or qualification for 
additional competition. Examples include, but are not limited to, interscholastic athletics, cheerleading, 
band, choral, math, or science competitions, and club activities. 
Academic Courses are those courses for which class time is scheduled, which can be credited to meet the 
minimum requirements for graduation, which is taught by a teacher required to have State certification in 
the course, and has a course content guide which has been approved by the Arkansas Department of 
Education. 
Supplemental Improvement Program (SIP) is an additional instructional opportunity for identified 
students outside of their regular classroom and meets the criteria outlined in the current Arkansas 
Activities Association Handbook. 
 
Academic Requirements: Junior High 
A student promoted from the sixth to the seventh grade automatically meets scholarship requirements. A 
student promoted from the seventh to the eighth grade automatically meets scholarship requirements for 
the first semester. The second semester eighth-grade student meets the scholarship requirements for junior 
high if he/she has successfully passed four (4) academic courses the previous semester, three (3) of which 
shall be in the core curriculum areas specified by the Arkansas Department of Education’s Standards of 
Accreditation of Arkansas Public Schools. 
The first semester ninth-grade student meets the scholarship requirements for junior high if he/she has 
successfully passed four (4) academic courses the previous semester, three (3) of which shall be in the 
core curriculum areas specified by the Arkansas Department of Education’s Standards of Accreditation of 
Arkansas Public Schools. 
The second semester ninth-grade student meets the scholarship requirements for junior high if he/she has 
successfully passed (4) academic courses the previous semester which count toward his/her graduation 
requirements. 
Ninth-grade students must meet the requirements of the senior high scholarship rule by the end of the 
second semester in the ninth grade in order to be eligible to participate the fall semester of their tenth-
grade year. 
 
Students with an Individual Educational Program 
In order to be considered eligible to participate in competitive interscholastic activities, students with 
disabilities must pass at least four (4) courses per semester as required by their individual education 
program (IEP). 
 
Arkansas Activities Association - IEP 
In addition to the foregoing rules, the district shall abide by the rules and regulations of the Arkansas 
Activities Association (AAA) governing interscholastic activities. AAA provides catastrophic insurance 

coverage for students participating in AAA governed extracurricular activities that are enrolled in school. 
As a matter of District policy, no student may participate in an AAA governed extracurricular activity 
unless he or she is enrolled in a district school, to ensure all students are eligible for AAA catastrophic 
insurance. 
Legal References: State Board of Education Standards for Accreditation 10.05 and 10.06 
Arkansas Activities Association Handbook 
 
 
 
4.56.2F – HOME SCHOOLED STUDENTS' LETTER OF INTENT TO 
PARTICIPATE IN AN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Student’s Name (Please Print) _______________________________________________________ 
 
Parent or Guardian's Resident Address 
 
Street ________________________________________________ Apartment _____________ 
 
City _________________________________________ State _____ Zip Code___________ 
 
Student's date of birth __/__/__ Last grade level the student completed ____________ 
 
Student has demonstrated academic eligibility by obtaining a verifiable minimum test score of the 30th 
percentile or better in the previous 12 months on the Stanford Achievement Test Series, Tenth Edition, or 
another nationally recognized norm-referenced test approved by the State Board of 
Education.___________ 
 
Name of test, Date taken, and score 
achieved____________________________________________________ 
 
Extracurricular activity(ies) the student requests to participate in 
 
________________________________________ 
 
Course(s) the student requests to take at the school 
_______________________________________________ 
 
Proof of identity ____ 
 
Date Submitted __/__/__ 
 
 
Parent's Signature ______________________________________________________________ 
 
 
Date Adopted: January 23, 2015 
Last Revised: January 23, 2015 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.57 – IMMUNIZATIONS 
 
 
Definitions 
"In process" means the student has received at least one dose of the required immunizations and is waiting 
the minimum time interval to receive the additional dose(s). 
“Serologic testing” refers to a medical procedure used to determine an individual’s immunity to Hepatitis 
B, Measles, Mumps, Rubella and Varicella. 
 
General Requirements 
Unless otherwise provided by law or this policy, no student shall be admitted to attend classes in the 
District who has not been age appropriately immunized against1: 
. Poliomyelitis; 
. Diphtheria; 
. Tetanus; 
. Pertussis; 
. Red (rubeola) measles; 
. Rubella; 
. Mumps; 
. Hepatitis A; 
. Hepatitis B; 
. Meningococcal disease; 
. Varicella (chickenpox); and 
. Any other immunization required by the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH). 
 
The District administration has the responsibility to evaluate the immunization status of District students. 
The District shall maintain a list of all students who are not fully age appropriately immunized or who 
have an exemption provided by ADH to the immunization requirements based on medical, religious, or 
philosophical grounds. Students who are not fully age appropriately immunized when seeking admittance 
shall be referred to a medical authority for consultation. 
 
The only types of proof of immunization the District will accept are immunization records provided by a: 
A. Licensed physician; 
B. Health department; 
C. Military service; or 
D. Official record from another educational institution in Arkansas. 
 
The proof of immunization must include the vaccine type and dates of vaccine administration. Documents 
stating “up-to-date”, “complete”, “adequate”, and the like will not be accepted as proof of immunization. 
No self or parental history of varicella disease will be accepted. Valid proof of immunization and of 
immunity based on serological testing shall be entered into the student’s record. 
 
In order to continue attending classes in the District, the student must have submitted: 
1) Proof of immunization showing the student to be fully age appropriately vaccinated; 
2) Written documentation by a public health nurse or private physician of proof the student is in process 
of being age appropriately immunized, which includes a schedule of the student’s next immunization; 

3) A copy of a letter from ADH indicating immunity based on serologic testing; and/or 
4) A copy of the letter from ADH exempting the student from the immunization requirements for the 
current school year, or a copy of the application for an exemption for the current school year if the 
exemption letter has not yet arrived. 
 
Students whose immunization records or serology results are lost or unavailable are required to receive all 
age appropriate vaccinations or submit number 4 above. 
 
 
Temporary Admittance 
While students who are not fully age appropriately immunized or have not yet submitted an immunization 
waver may be enrolled to attend school, such students shall be allowed to attend school on a temporary 
basis only. Students admitted on a temporary basis may be admitted for a maximum of thirty (30) days (or 
until October 1st of the current school year for the tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, and meningococcal 
vaccinations required at ages eleven (11) and sixteen (16) respectively if October 1st is later in the current 
school year than the thirty (30) days following the student’s admittance). No student shall be withdrawn 
and readmitted in order to extend the thirty (30) day period. Students may be allowed to continue 
attending beyond the thirty (30) day period if the student submits a copy of either number 2 or number 4 
above. 
Students who are in process shall be required to adhere to the submitted schedule. Failure of the student to 
submit written documentation from a public health nurse or private physician demonstrating the student 
received the vaccinations set forth in the schedule may lead to the revocation of the student’s temporary 
admittance; such students shall be excluded from school until the documentation is provided. 
The District will not accept copies of applications requesting an exemption for the current school year that 
are older than two (2) weeks based on the date on the application. Students who submit a copy of an 
application to receive an exemption from the immunization requirements for the current year to gain 
temporary admittance have thirty (30) days from the admission date to submit either a letter from ADH 
granting the exemption or documentation demonstrating the student is in process and a copy of the 
immunization schedule. Failure to submit the necessary documentation by the close of the thirty (30) days 
will result in the student being excluded until the documentation is submitted. 
 
Exclusion From School 
In the event of an outbreak, students who are not fully age appropriately immunized, are in process, or are 
exempt from the immunization requirements may be required to be excluded from school in order to 
protect the student. ADH shall determine if it is necessary for students to be excluded in the event of an 
outbreak. Students may be excluded for twenty-one (21) days or longer depending on the outbreak. No 
student excluded due to an outbreak shall be allowed to return to school until the District receives 
approval from ADH. 
 
Students who are excluded from school are not eligible to receive homebound instruction unless the 
excluded student had a pre-existing IEP or 504 Plan and the IEP/504 team determines homebound 
instruction to be in the best interest of the student. To the extent possible, the student’s teacher(s) shall 
place in the principal’s office a copy of the student’s assignments: 
. For the remainder of the week by the end of the initial school day of the student's exclusion; and 
. By the end of each school's calendar week for the upcoming week until the student returns to school. 
 
It is the responsibility of the student or the student’s parent/legal guardian to make sure that the student’s 
assignments are collected. 
Students excluded from school shall have five (5) school days from the day the student returns to school 
to submit any homework and to make up any examinations. State mandated assessments are not included 
in “examinations” and the District has no control over administering state mandated make-up assessments 
outside of the state's schedule. Students shall receive a grade of zero for any assignment or examination 
not completed or submitted on time. 
Cross References: 4.2—ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
 4.7—ABSENCES 

 4.8—MAKE-UP WORK 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-702 
 ADE Rules Governing Kindergarten Through 12th Grade Immunization Requirements 
In Arkansas Public Schools 
ADH Rules and Regulations Pertaining to Immunization Requirements 
Date Adopted: January 23, 2015 Last Revised: January 23, 2015 
 
 
 
 
 
4.58 – FOOD SHARING & ITS REMOVAL FROM FOOD SERVICE 
AREA 
 
 
 
 
Food Sharing Table 
In an effort to reduce wasted food and to provide students access to healthy foods when possible, the 
District shall have in the district cafeteria a food sharing table located at the end of the service line. Prior 
to leaving the service line, students may place on or retrieve items from the table, at no additional charge, 
any of the following: 
. Raw whole fruit traditionally eaten without the peel (e.g. bananas and oranges); 
. Raw whole fruit traditionally eaten with the peel provided the fruit is wrapped to prevent 
contamination (e.g. apples and grapes); 
. Raw whole vegetables provided the vegetable is wrapped to prevent contamination (e.g. carrot 
sticks); 
. Milk; and 
. Juice. 
 
Fruit and vegetables to be shared are to be placed into a designated container on the table. Milk and juice 
to be shared are to be placed in an ice-filled cooler. Milk and juice may not be taken by another student 
unless the carton is unopened and was completely covered by ice while in the cooler. A student may not 
return to the table to place an item for sharing after the student has left the service line. 
 
At all times, the sharing table will be under the supervision of the food service staff. Remaining items 
should be discarded at the end of the meal period, and no item may remain on the table for longer than 
four (4) hours. 
 
No student shall remove school provided food items from the food service area at the end of the meal 
period, especially milk, juice, and other items requiring temperature controlled environments. 
 
Except for food service workers as required by their job duties, District employees may only remove 
school provided food items from the food service area when required by a 504 plan or a student’s IEP. 
Legal References: Commissioner’s Memo FIN 08-076 
 Commissioner’s Memo FIN 15-052 
Date Adopted: February 23, 2015 Last Revised: 
 
5.29—WELLNESS POLICY 
 
 
 
 
 
The health and physical well-being of our students directly affects their ability to learn. Childhood obesity 
increases the incidence of adult diseases occurring in children and adolescents such as heart disease, high 
blood pressure and diabetes. The increased risk carries forward into their adulthood. Research indicates 
that a healthy diet and regular physical activity can help prevent obesity and the diseases resulting from it. 
It is understood that the eating habits and exercise patterns of students cannot be magically changed 
overnight, but at the same time, the Board of Directors believes it is necessary to strive to create a culture 
in our schools that consistently promotes good nutrition and physical activity. 
 

The problem of obesity and inactivity is a public health issue. The Board of Directors is keenly aware that 
it has taken years for this problem to reach its present level and will similarly take years to correct. The 
responsibility for addressing the problem lies not only with the schools and the Arkansas Department of 
Education (ADE), but with the community and its residents, organizations and agencies. Therefore, the 
District shall enlist the support of the larger community to find solutions which improve the health and 
physical activity of our students. 
 
 
Goals 
In its efforts to improve the school nutrition environment, promote student health, and reduce childhood 
obesity, the District will adhere to the ADE Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards 
And Body Mass Index For Age Assessment Protocols. To promote nutrition, physical activity, and other 
school based activities that will improve student wellness, the District has established the following goals. 
1 
1. Appoint a district school health coordinator (designated district official) who shall be responsible for 
ensuring that each school fulfills the requirements of this policy;2 
2. Implement a grade appropriate nutrition education program that will develop an awareness of and 
appreciation for nutrition and physical activity throughout the curriculum; 
3. Enforce existing physical education requirements and engage students in healthy levels of vigorous 
physical activity; 
4. Strive to improve the quality of physical education curricula and increase the training of physical 
education teachers; 
5. Follow the Arkansas Physical Education and Health Education Frameworks in grades K-12; 
6. Not use food or beverages as rewards for academic, classroom, or sports performances; 
7. Ensure that drinking water is available without charge to all students; 
8. Establish class schedules and bus routes that do not directly or indirectly restrict meal access; 
9. Provide students with ample time to eat their meals in pleasant cafeteria and dining areas; 
10. Establish no more than nine (9) school wide events that permit exceptions to the food and beverage 
limitations established by Rule. The schedule of the events shall be by school, approved by the 
principal, and shall be part of the annual school calendar;3 
11. Abide by the current allowable food and beverage portion standards; 
12. Meet or exceed the more stringent of Arkansas’ or the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Nutrition 
Standards for reimbursable meals and a la’ carte foods served in the cafeteria;4 
13. Restrict access to competitive foods, as required by law and Rule; 
14. Conform new and/or renewed vending contracts to the content restrictions contained in the Rules and 
reduce district dependence on profits from the sale of competitive foods. 
15. Provide professional development to all district staff on the topics of nutrition and/or physical 
activity;5 
16. Utilize the School Health Index available from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to assess how 
well the district is doing at implementing this wellness policy and at promoting a healthy environment 
for its students; 
 
Advisory Committee 
To enhance the district’s efforts to improve the health of our students, a School Nutrition and Physical 
Activity Advisory Committee (SNPAAC) shall be formed. It shall be structured in a way that ensures 
age-appropriate recommendations are made that correlate to our district’s grade configurations.6 The 
SNPAAC shall have the powers and responsibilities delegated to it by statute and Rule and are 
incorporated into this policy by reference.7 The overarching goal of the committee shall be to promote 
student wellness by monitoring how well the district is doing at implementing this policy. The SNPAAC 
shall use modules 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 of the CDC’s School Health Index as a basis for annually assessing 
each school’s progress toward meeting the requirements of this policy. The results of the annual 
assessment shall be included in each school’s ACSIP, provided to each school’s principal, and reported to 
the board. Goals and objectives for nutrition and physical activity shall also be included in the ACSIP. 
 

Members of the District’s Board of Directors, school administrators, school nutrition personnel, teacher 
organizations, parents, students, professional groups (such as nurses), and community members shall be 
included in the development, implementation, and periodic review of the District's wellness policy to the 
extent interested persons from each group desire to be included.8 
 
The SNPAAC shall provide recommendations to the school district concerning menus and other foods 
sold in the school cafeteria. Such recommendations shall be based, at least in part, on the information the 
Committee receives from the District on the requirements and standards of the National School Lunch 
Program and from menus for the National School Lunch Program and other food sold in the school 
cafeteria on a quarterly basis.9 
 
The District will work with the SNPAAC to: 
A. Encourage participation in extracurricular programs that support physical activity, such as walk-
to-school programs, biking clubs, after-school walking etc.; 
B. Encourage the implementation of developmentally appropriate physical activity in after-school 
childcare programs for participating children; 
C. Promote the reduction of time youth spend engaged in sedentary activities such as watching 
television and playing video games; and 
D. Encourage the development of and participation in family-oriented community-based physical 
activity programs. 
 
The District shall periodically assess, with input from the SNPACC, the District and individual schools' 
status regarding implementing this policy. The assessment shall be based, at least in part, on: 
. the extent to which District schools are in compliance with this policy; 
. the extent to which this policy compares to other model local school wellness policies; and 
. a description of the progress made in attaining the goals of this policy. 
The assessment results along with the content of this policy shall be periodically reported to the public, 
including parents, students, and other members of the community. 
Legal References: Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act 42 U.S.C. § 1751 et seq. as amended by PL 111-
296 (Section 204) of 2010. (Section 204 is codified at 42 U.S.C. § 1758(b)) 
Child Nutrition Act of 1966 42 U.S.C. § 1771 et seq. 
A.C.A. § 6-20-709 
A.C.A. §§ 20-7-133, 134, and 135 
ADE Rules Governing Nutrition and Physical Activity Standards And Body Mass Index For Age Assessment 
Protocols 
Allowable Competitive Foods/Beverages - Maximum Portion Size List for Middle, Junior High, and High 
School 
Nutrition Standards for Arkansas Public Schools 
Date Adopted: Last Revised:April 2016 
 
 
6.5 – VISITORS TO THE SCHOOLS 
 
 
Parents, grandparents, legal guardians, business, and community members are welcome and encouraged 
to visit District schools. To minimize the potential for disruption of the learning environment, visitors, for 
a purpose other than to attend an activity open to the general public, are required to first report to the 
school’s main office. No one shall be exempt from this requirement. Visitors who are Level 3 or Level 4 
sex offenders may only enter a school campus under the provisions listed in Policy 6.10. 
 
Parents and legal guardians are encouraged to participate in regularly scheduled visitation events such as 
school open houses and parent/teacher conferences. Additional conferences are best when scheduled in 
advance. Conferences shall be scheduled at a time and place to accommodate those participating in the 
conference. Visits to individual classrooms during class time are permitted on a limited basis with the 
principal’s prior approval and the teacher’s knowledge. 
 
Visitors, including parents wishing to speak with students during the school day shall register first with 
the office. 

 
The District has the right to ask disruptive visitors to leave its school campuses. Principals are authorized 
to seek the assistance of law enforcement officers in removing any disruptive visitors who refuse to leave 
school property when requested to do so. 
Cross References: For non-adult visitors see Policy 4.16—STUDENT VISITORS 
For Level 3 and Level 4 sex offenders see Policy 6.10—SEX OFFENDERS ON CAMPUS (MEGAN’S LAW) 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-21-606 
 A.C.A. § 6-21-607 
Date Adopted: 
Last Revised: January 23, 2015 
 
 
 
COUNSELING/SCHOOL-BASED MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS 
 
 
Professional counseling services are provided for all students in grades Pre-K through grade four 
addressing the academic, personal/social, and career development needs of students. Students are 
counseled individually, small group, and whole group based upon self-referrals and those referrals from 
administrator, parent, teacher, and other school staff members. Specific needs sessions are held when 
required. Confidentiality, as well as, ethical and professional standards dictated by the American School 
Counselor Association, American Counseling Association, and the Arkansas Department of Education is 
maintained. 
 
School counselors are advocates, leaders, collaborators, and consultants who create opportunities for 
equity in access and success in educational opportunities. Subscribing to the tenets of professional 
responsibility may find it necessary and appropriate for referrals for consideration of therapeutic 
intervention and/or further evaluations. These referrals necessitate parent/guardian conferences. In-
school referrals to a contracted school based mental health agency are coordinated through the 
counselor’s office. At the present time, Drew Central contracts with two mental health agencies – Living 
Hope Southeast and Day Springs. Drew Central School District requires proof of certification and/or 
licensure of those providing mental health services to our students. 
 
 
SELECTION/INSPECTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 
 
 
The use of instructional materials beyond those approved as part of the curriculum/textbook program 
must be compatible with school and district policies. If there is uncertainty concerning the 
appropriateness of supplemental materials, the personnel desiring to use the materials shall get approval 
from the principal prior to putting the materials into use. 
 
All instructional materials used as part of the educational curriculum of a student shall be available for 
inspection by the parents or guardians of the student. For the purposes of this policy, instructional 
materials is defined as instructional content provided to the student regardless of its format, including 
printed or representational materials, audio-visual materials, and materials in electronic or digital formats. 
The term does not include academic tests or academic assessments. 
 
Parents or guardians wishing to inspect instructional materials used as part of the educational curriculum 
for their child may schedule an appointment with the student’s teacher at a mutually agreeable time. 
Parents/guardians wishing to challenge the appropriateness of any instructional materials shall follow the 
procedures outlined in Policy 5.6—CHALLENGE OF INSTRUCTIONAL/SUPPLEMENTAL 
MATERIALS. 
The rights provided to parents under this policy transfer to the student when he/she turns 18 years old. 
 Legal Reference: 20 USC § 1232h (a), (b), (c) [NCLB Act of 2001, Part F, Section 1061 (c) (1) (C) (I) (ii), (2) (A) (I), (5) (B), (6) (A) (C)] 
Date Adopted: 10/12/2005 Last Revised: 
 
 
TEACHER REMOVAL OF STUDENTS FROM CLASS 
 

 
 
A teacher may remove a student from class whose behavior the teacher has documented to be repeatedly 
interfering with the teacher's ability to teach the students in the class or whose behavior is so unruly, 
disruptive or abusive that it interferes with the ability of the student's other classmates to learn. Students 
who have been removed from their classroom by a teacher shall be sent to the principal's or principal's 
designee's office for appropriate discipline. 
 
The teacher's principal or the principal's designee may: 
 
1. Place the student into another appropriate classroom; 
2. Place the student into in-school suspension; 
3. Place the student into the District's alternative learning environment in accordance with Policy 
5.26—ALTERNATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS; 
4. Return the student to the class; or 
5. Take other appropriate action consistent with the District's student discipline policies and state 
and federal law. 
 
If a teacher removes a student from class two (2) times during any nine-week grading period, the principal 
or the principal's designee may not return the student to the teacher's class unless a conference has been 
held for the purpose of determining the cause of the problem and possible solutions. The conference is to 
be held with the following individuals present: 
 
1. The principal or the principal's designee; 
2. The teacher; 
3. The school counselor; 
4. The parents, guardians, or persons in loco parentis; and 
5. The student, if appropriate. 
 
However, the failure of the parents, guardians, or persons in loco parentis to attend the conference does 
not prevent any action from being taken as a result of the conference. 
Legal References: A.C.A. § 6-18-511 
Arkansas Department of Education Guidelines for the Development, Review and Revision of School District Student 
Discipline and School Safety Policies 
 
 
ACT/ASPIRE 
Arkansas recently selected ACT Aspire as the state assessment for Arkansas public schools for the 2015-2016 
school year. Students in grades fifth through eighth at Drew Central Middle School School will be assessed with 
this assessment this year. Below is information about the assessment and the reasoning behind the selection of this 
particular assessment: 
ABOUT US 
“At ACT Aspire LLC, we develop Summative, Interim, and Classroom testing solutions to help craft well-
informed student pathways to college and career. We do this by connecting student growth from grades 3-
8 and early high school in the context of college and career readiness. 
 
THE FIRST OF ITS KIND - Our solution is unique because it is a connected approach. ACT Aspire is 
anchored by the ACT®, now the leading college entrance assessment. Such continuity is unmatched by 
other systems. 
Our approach goes beyond other solutions because the ACT Aspire Assessment System will provide 
standards-based reporting — with reporting categories based on the ACT College Readiness Standards 
— and aligned to the Common Core State Standards. 

This means ACT Aspire measures student progress using the most comprehensive academic guideposts 
available. Thus, we’ve positioned our solution to add an exceptional dimension of actionable 
informational insight to your college and career readiness initiative. 
COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS - Through evidence-based design principles, we craft items to 
measure college and career readiness skills and knowledge. Importantly, ACT has years of actual student 
data that we use to validate the successful alignment of our assessments. 
These evidence-based, validated test development procedures and principles are in place and have been 
used to develop ACT Aspire items and forms. Our development team also works with subject matter 
experts in each content area to verify the alignment of items to standards and item classifications.” 
http://www.discoveractaspire.org/about-us/ 
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS - “ACT Aspire offers a system of aligned summative assessments that 
can be implemented at a state, district or school level. 
PROVEN IMPLEMENTATIONS - Significant to potential state adopters, our solution is already in use 
with successful implementations involving hundreds of thousands of students per administration. 
Numerous states have launched inquiries about selecting ACT Aspire as their own state assessment 
platform, so your interest and inquiry enjoys good company. 
SUSTAINABILITY 
Essential to any state adoption, our summative solution provides year-to-year sustainability. 
. Partner ACT conducts ongoing research and validation of the system to reflect changes in college 
and career readiness standards. 
. Partner Pearson conducts parallel ongoing efforts to provide the latest in technical 
administration, scoring and reporting protocols. 
The commitment to year-to-year sustainability is solid and assured with ACT Aspire. 
COVERAGE – 
 ACT Aspire covers 5 content areas: 
. English 
. Math 
. Reading 
. Science 
. Direct writing at all grades. 
This provides educators with actionable insights that reflect a broader and more relevant picture of the 
learner. 
AVOIDING TEST FATIGUE - Perhaps the most controversial aspect of summative assessment is the 
amount of time needed to capture a useful picture of the learner’s progress. 
Our position on the amount of time needed to assess is based on both ACT research and discussion 
among assessment professionals. In essence, we avoid potential outcome error that can result from 
extended-duration testing. When a student concludes that testing is a seemingly endless chore, genuine 

effort can be diminished, and outcomes may be disappointingly skewed. Skewed data is simply not useful 
for any educational purpose. 
INSTRUCTIONAL RELEVANCE - To best determine the amount of time your learners need to spend 
on assessment, we identify the most instructionally relevant level of measurement for each element of our 
assessment system. For a summative assessment, this is the cluster level of reporting. Domain and cluster 
level reporting gives educators invaluable insights into student progress, and also informs ACT Aspire’s 
predictive capacity. Such reporting helps educators craft an overall program of instruction in 5 content 
areas. 
As an additional and essential component of a full solution, ACT Aspire also offers Periodic Assessments. 
These are short assessments that are: 
. crafted to monitor student progress throughout the year 
. intended as companion tests that complement the Summative component by providing a snapshot 
of achievement as they progress throughout the school year. 
As such, ACT Aspire Periodic assessments may be optionally acquired as part of a state-wide adoption, a 
district or even a school implementation.” http://www.discoveractaspire.org/assessments/summative/ 
 
GIFTED & TALENTED EDUCATION 
 
 
The GT program of Drew Central Middle School consists of a pullout program, for the identified students 
in grades 5-6. The identified students go to the GT room 75 minutes per week for enrichment, 
acceleration, and higher level thinking activities. Another 75 minutes of enrichment is done in the regular 
classroom. The group participates in the annual Quiz Bowl and Chess Tournament held each spring. 
Grade 7-8 students identified as GT may enroll in pre-AP classes. Please contact Stephanie Eubanks, at 
367-6076 for more information. 
 
Students selected for the program must be identified through screening or high level achievement, 
creativity, and task-commitment. Teachers refer potential GT students in the spring, and tests are given to 
these students for placement. The purpose of the program warrants careful consideration of the referrals, 
in order to meet their special needs that cannot always be met in the regular classroom. Students who do 
not need additional enrichment activities do not need to be pulled out of the regular classroom for such 
services. 
 
 
HOMEWORK POLICY 
 
 
Homework is considered to be a time for skill practice, enrichment, or more in depth attention to 
a given unit of study or subject area. 
Homework will be in accordance with the following policies: 
1. It should not be excessive. 
2. It should be for practice that is related to previously taught skills. 
3. It will be checked and discussed, and can be averaged in grades. 
4. Specially assigned projects will be included as part of the overall grade. 
 
Exceptions to the above policies are as follows: 
1. Students who do not complete daily work may be required to finish it at home. 
2. Studying for tests is not considered “formal” homework. 
3. If a student is having difficulty in a given subject area, extra homework may be assigned for 
extra practice. 

. Your child’s teacher will devise a procedure in which homework assignments will be 
made and recorded. The teacher will make you aware of the procedures to be used. 
Parents will be contacted through the Home Access Center (HAC) when a student 
consistently fails, two times, to complete homework assignments on time and a different 
homework plan may be initiated at that time. 
. Students in grades 5 & 6 must purchase a homework assignment book. It is the child’s 
responsibility to write assignments down in the assignment book. Parents are encouraged 
to monitor the student’s assignments on a daily basis. When the student has completed 
the work, the parent\caregiver\guardian should check the box in the homework notebook 
and sign on the appropriate line/box. 
 
 
REPORTING PROGRESS TO PARENTS 
 
Parents should expect to be informed of their child’s progress and the school’s activities in a variety of 
ways. These may include: 
. Progress Reports – Parents will receive their child’s progress reports on: 
 September 13, 2016 – at the school wide Parent/Teacher conferences, 
 November 15, 2016 – will be sent home with student, 
 February 16, 2017 – at the school wide Parent/Teacher conferences 
 April 13, 2017 – will be sent home with student. 
 
. Report Cards – Parents will receive their child’s Report Card on: 
October 20, 2016 – Awards Assembly 
January 10, 2017 – Awards Assembly 
March 16, 2017 – Awards Assembly 
May 30, 2017 – Awards Assembly 
..Arkansas Standardized Tests – Parents will receive the results of the state testing from the 
....previous year as soon as they become available from the state department. 
.... 
OTHER REPORTING METHODS TO PARENTS MIGHT BE: 
1. Newsletters, Student Handbook, Cafeteria Menus 
2. Teacher notes, post cards and telephone calls 
3. Informative meetings held at school for parents 
4. HAC/TAC 
5. Media coverage – Radio, Newspaper – print & online 
6. Drew Central Middle School Web Site: ms.drewcentral.org 
7. Drew Central Middle School Facebook page 
8. SchoolWay App 
 
 
HAC 
 
 
HOME ACCESS CENTER 
Home Access Center (HAC) is a web application which allows students and parents to view 
registration, class assignments, report cards, discipline, attendance, and scheduling information. A 
letter will be mailed home to students and parents that will include their secure login and password 
to access HAC records. 
With HAC: http://hac24.eschoolplus.k12.ar.us 
. View demographic information 
. View address information 

. View interim progress reports and report cards for the current grading period 
. View attendance information in calendar format with color-coded absence types 
. View current schedule 
. View class work and assignments 
. View discipline infractions 
. Access teacher and counselor e-mail 
 
 
 
GRADING POLICY 
 
 
The Numeric Grading Scale (percentages) is used for students in grades 5-8. Grades assigned to students 
reflect only educational objectives and are consistent with laws and regulations. 
 
Numeric Grading Scale 
A = 90% - 100% 
B = 80% - 89% 
C = 70% - 79% 
D = 60% - 69% 
F = 59% & Below 
 
 
 
ACADEMIC RECOGNITION 
 
 
Students in grades five through eight will be eligible for academic recognition based on the following 
criteria: 
o Principal’s List – Any student in grades 5-8 and has all A’s (4.00) for the current grading 
period will be placed on the Principal’s List. 


 
o Pirate’s Pride List – Any student in grades 5-8 and has an overall grade point average of 
3.00 - 3.99 will be placed on the Pirate’s Pride List. 


 
o Pirate’s Merit List – Any student in grades 5-8 who has an overall grade point average of 
2.50 - 2.99 will be placed on the Pirate’s Merit List. 


 
** Any student who receives a U (Unsatisfactory) in conduct or a D or F in any subject will not be 
eligible for any academic recognition or achievement lists. 
 
Act 390 of 2005 - Any parent or student who does not want to have their student identified as an honor 
student or listed on the honor roll shall submit a written request to the principal of the school requesting 
that the student not be identified (by September 15 of the current school year). The school and school 
district shall not identify any student (achieving honor roll status), who has submitted a written request. 
 
 
ATTENDANCE AWARDS 
 
 
 
Awards for perfect attendance are given at the end of each nine weeks. Students with perfect attendance 
will receive perfect attendance pencils, pins or certificates during the Awards Assembly held each nine 
weeks. 
 
 
 

 
CURRICULUM 
 
 
Revision of each of the Arkansas Curriculum Frameworks every six years is required by the state 
education reform initiatives mandated by the State Board of Education. All curriculum framework 
documents result from the work of a committee of Arkansas educators representing every facet of 
Arkansas education, including geographic region, grade, school size and fiscal status, gender, ethnicity, 
and education experience. 
 
State Board rules for framework revision specify that committees rely on a variety of resources to inform 
their work. These include an expert reviewers’ evaluation of the current framework, input from the 
Arkansas Department of Higher Education and the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education, and a 
review of national and state standards from across the country. 
 
LOCKERS 
 
 
 
 
Lockers are rented to 7th and 8th grade students at a charge of $6.00 per year, of which $5.00 is refunded 
upon return of the lock to school officials. Locks are provided with the locker and are subject to 
administrative search. If students place decorations on the locker they must be able to remove the 
decoration completely. 
 
LOST TEXTBOOKS 
 
 
 
 
Textbooks are provided at no cost for normal student use. Fines are imposed for damage, and undue 
wear. Replacement fees are charged for lost textbooks, books from the classroom library and Curriculum 
Library. Grades will be held until these fees are paid. Prices will vary depending on the cost of the book. 
 
 
MONEY/STUDENT PROPERTY 
 
 
 
At no time should students bring large amounts of money to school. Students will be allowed to purchase 
paper and pencils from the vending machine, but they will not have access to candy and soda machines. 
They can also bring money to spend during the two scheduled book fairs. 
 
Parents are requested to label all items such as coats, hats, lunch boxes, etc with the student’s first and last 
name. Students should not bring items (such as toys, prohibited electronic items, etc.) that are not needed 
for school work. Teachers have the right to confiscate such items and take to the office of the building 
principal for the parents to pick up. The school cannot accept responsibility for such items that are lost, 
stolen, or damaged. 
 
 
 
PARENT CENTER 
 
The Parent Center is designed to unite teachers, parents and students together through fun activities and 
learning workshops. In strengthening the home and school connection, we can assist our students in 
achieving their highest potential in education. 
For further information regarding any services offered through the Parent Center, please contact Anna 
Jones, Parent Center Coordinator at 367-5235, extension 114. 
 
 
PARENT-TEACHER ORGANIZATION (PTO) 
 
 

The Drew Central PTO meets at 5:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month in the Middle School 
Library, “Bringing Parents and Teachers Together.” 
PTO Meeting Calendar 
September 1, 2016 
October 6, 2016 
November 3, 2016 
December 1, 2016 
January 5, 2017 
February 2, 2017 
March 2, 2017 
April 6, 2017 
May 4, 2017 

 
 
 
 
 
 
DCMS PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 
PP PLAN 
 
 
Drew Central Middle School recognizes that a child’s education is a responsibility shared by the 
school and family all through the child’s school career. We support the goal of the school being 
responsible for educating all students effectively with the school and parents working as 
knowledgeable partners. We also know that cultural diversity is important, and that parents with 
diverse cultures are an integral component of the school’s ability to provide for the educational 
success of students. Consequently, the engagement of parents is essential to improve student 
achievement; therefore, Drew Central Middle School will foster and support parental involvement. 
 
Parents of students of all grade levels will be included in a variety of comprehensive and coordinated 
activities that encourage active parental involvement. Recognizing that communication between home 
and school should be regular, two-way, and meaningful, Drew Central Middle School will: 
 
A. Prepare family kits appropriate for the age and grade of the child that will include: 
1. The school’s parental involvement plan. 
2. The recommended role of the parent, student, teacher, and school. 
3. Ways for the parents to become involved in the school and his or her child’s 
education. 
4. Activities planned throughout the school year to encourage parental involvement. 
5. A system (homework notebook, Parent-Teacher conference) to allow the parents 
and teachers to communicate in a regular, two-way, and meaningful manner with 
the child’s teacher and the school principal. 
6. A calendar of scheduled school events which parents are encouraged to attend. 




 
B. Schedule at least two parent teacher conferences per year, one each semester of the school year. 
 
C. Plan and engage in activities which will be beneficial in encouraging communication with parents 
while promoting responsible parenting. 
1. Purchase parenting books, magazines and other informative material regarding 
responsible parenting, advertise the current selection, and give parents an 
opportunity to borrow the materials to review. 
2. Give parents parenting books on assisting with homework, working with pre-
school children, and other topics concerning effective parenting. 
3. Create a school newsletter to be distributed to all parents. 
4. Send home a monthly calendar of scheduled school and class events. 
5. Publish a notice in the local newspaper at the end of the school year; honoring 
parents who attend the scheduled school events. 
6. Maintain a parent center and update for Grades 7-12. 
a. The parent coordinator will be responsible for keeping records of usage. 
b. Teachers will refer parents to the parent center if the student has 
problems that may be addressed through the parent center. 






 

A. Acknowledge that parents play an integral role in assisting student learning. To help parents assist 
students, Drew Central Middle School will schedule a “Parent Night” where parents are given a 
report on the state of the school and an overview of curriculum, assessment, expectations of both 
parents and teachers and how parents can assist and make a difference in his or her child’s 
education. 
1. Schedule Family Literacy Nights through the Parent Center. 
2. Schedule Family Math Night through the Parent Center. 
3. Schedule an Open-house meeting for parents before school begins. 




 
B. Welcome parents into Drew Central Middle School. 
1. Give the parents our policy which encourages parents to: 
a. Visit a child’s classroom during regular school hours and scheduled 
events. 
b. Pick up a child if necessary either outside the school building at regular 
pick-up places or through a check-out system in the office. 
c. Visit with the counselor/and or principal regularly or if a need arises. 
 
2. Publish a volunteer resource book that lists and matches the interests and 
availability of volunteers to school staff members. The survey that shows 
parental interests, frequency of wish to participate (may be only once a year), and 
listing options for those available to work at home will be included. 
a. A volunteer sign-in sheet in the resource book will be located in the 
Parent Center office. 
b. Parents entering the building will be encouraged to volunteer their 
services. 
c. The resource list and survey will be included in the resource book. 
 
3. Make available statements attesting to the school district’s commitment to 
parental involvement by including such statements in the Drew Central Middle 
School handbook that is given to every child at the time of the child’s entry in the 
school each year. 
4. Policy requires teachers to communicate with the parent(s) or 
guardian(s) of students to discuss the student’s progress (Progress Reports) and 
requires more frequent communication with the parent(s) or guardian(s) of 
student not performing at the level expected for their grade. 
 
C. Recognize that a parent is a full partner in the decisions that affect his or her child and family by 
publishing the school’s process for resolving parental concerns (defining the problem, the chain 
of command, and how to develop solutions) in the Drew Central Middle School’s handbook. 
1. Parental conferences will be scheduled at times agreed upon by the parents, 
teachers, and or principal. 
2. Include parents on the handbook committee to review and update handbook 
annually. 
3. Extra copies of the handbook will be distributed upon requests. 
 
D. Recognize that community resources strengthen middle school programs, family practices, and 
student learning and will take advantage of community resources. 
1. A parent advisory commission made up of alumni parents and current parents 
will be established to provide advice and guidance for school improvement. 
2. Involve school/community patrons in the ACSIP plan for school improvement as 
participants in advisory capacities. 
3. A PTO is supported by parents, teachers and administration. 
4. Work with community/business members to help with and promote activities 
within the school to strengthen school programs, family practices and student 
learning. 





a. Ask for volunteers to visit classrooms. 
b. Ask for monetary or human resource support for activities/programs. 
c. Ask for referral services. 
d. Publish partners of Drew Central Middle School in our newsletters and 
in the local newspaper. 
 
E. Support the development, implementation, and regular evaluation of the program to involve 
parents in the decisions and practices of the school district by including parents in the ACSIP 
plan, Title I plans, Title VI plans, handbook revisions, and in the PTO. Parent evaluation surveys 
will be disseminated at the end of each year and will be included as a part of the school/district 
evaluations of programs. 
 
F. The principal of Drew Central Middle School will designate one certified staff member that is 
willing to serve as parent facilitator to organize meaningful training for staff and parents 
promoting and encouraging a welcoming atmosphere to parental involvement. 
1. Designate a certified staff member at the beginning of the school year. 
2. Seek supplemental payment for the designated employee. 
3. Show parental involvement as an asset to the school. 




 
G. The Drew Central School District will require (2) two hours of staff development for elementary 
teachers to enhance the understanding of effective parenting. These two hours may be included 
in the teacher’s required (60) sixty hours of staff development required by the state. 
 
K. The Drew Central School District will require (3) three hours for district administrators of 
Parental Involvement staff development designed to enhance understanding of effective parental 
involvement strategies and the importance of administrative leadership in setting expectations and 
creating a climate conducive to parental participation. 
 
L. Provide instruction to parents on how to incorporate developmentally 
appropriate learning activities in the home environment, including: 
1. Role play and demonstration by trained volunteers 
2. The use of and access to Department of Education Website tools for parents. 
3. Assistance with nutritional meal planning and preparation. 
4. Other strategies or curricula developed or acquired by the school district for at-
home parental instruction approved by the Department of Education. 
 
M. The Drew Central Middle School will annually review and update the Parental Involvement plan 
and give it to the superintendent. 
 
N. The Drew Central Middle School Parental Involvement Plan will be reviewed by Department of 
Education as part of the Drew Central School District’s Parental Involvement Plan. 
 
 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
 
 
Physical Education is required for all middle school students for 60 minutes a week, or every day for 9 
weeks. If a student’s participation has some limitations, it will be necessary to submit a written note to 
the office submitting an excuse from physical education activities. Continued limitation will require a 
medical doctor’s excuse on file in the office. 
 
 
 
SCHOOL TELEPHONE 
 
 
 

Students will not be permitted to use the telephone unless it is an emergency. Please make necessary 
plans with your children before they leave home in the morning so they will not have to call home after 
they arrive at school. If your plans should change during the day, please call the school no later than 2:30 
p.m. to assure that your child receives the message. Due to the large number of messages and the 
difficulty in locating students, the office cannot guarantee that the message will be delivered and they will 
not accept any responsibility for the missed communication if the call was not received before the 2:30 
p.m. deadline. 
 
Calls to students and/or teachers are discouraged during scheduled classes. Please feel free to leave a 
message or number to be called by the student and/or teacher during a free time. Emergency calls dealing 
with illness will be taken immediately. 
 
Drew Central telephones are on a “roll-over” system and the phone numbers that show up on the home’s 
Caller ID many times are not the office or phone from which the call was originated. 
 
TITLE I – SCHOOL-WIDE 
 
 
 
Title I is a federally funded program designed to work with students who need extra help in the areas of 
reading and math. It is a teacher directed program implemented school-wide to help students reach grade 
level. For information concerning this program, contact the Federal Programs Coordinator at 367-5369. 
 
 
WINTER/SUMMER PLAYGROUND POLICY 
 
 
 
The Internet Weather Channel will be consulted to find the temperature and heat index/chill factor for our 
area: 
1. If the temperature is 38 degrees or above and the wind chill factor is above freezing, the students 
will go outside for a short break following their lunch. 
2. If the temperature (heat index) is 97 degrees or higher students will remain inside during the 
lunch break period. 
3. The principal will determine any exception to the above policy. 
 
 
WITHDRAWAL OF STUDENTS 
 
 
When moving from Drew Central, parents are requested to notify the school two (2) days in advance of a student’s 
impending withdrawal. The withdrawal form and instructions will be obtained from the office. All textbooks, 
library books, and lunch payments must be cleared before student’s records are sent to the receiving school. 
 
 
Drew Central School District School-Parent Compact 
 
The Drew Central School District and the parents of the students participating in activities, services, 
and programs funded by Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) 
(participating children), agree that this compact outlines how the parents, the entire school staff, and the 
students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by 
which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership that will help children achieve the 
State’s high standards. 
This school-parent compact is in effect during the 2016 – 2017 school year. 
School Responsibilities 
The Drew Central School District will: 
 

1. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning 
environment that enables the participating children to meet the State’s student academic 
achievement standards as follows: DCS is required to enlist and retain highly qualified staff 
members. If a staff member is hired that does not meet the highly qualified, the school will 
provide professional development that will assure they meet the highly qualified status. The 
administration follows the TESS model to monitor the learning environment so that each child 
receives a high quality level of instruction. Our school district also employs a curriculum 
coordinator who oversees the instruction and who monitors the curriculum as well as the ongoing 
professional development of each staff member. 
 
 
2. Hold parent-teacher conferences semiannually during which this compact will be discussed 
as it relates to the individual child’s achievement. Specifically, those conferences will be held 
on each campus on September 13, 2016 and February 16, 2017. 
 
3. Provide parents with frequent reports on their children’s progress. Parents and guardians are 
encouraged to look at student’s grades online at the Home Access Center otherwise known as 
HAC. For log in information and access, contact your school’s secretary. 
 
4. Provide parents reasonable access to staff. All staff are allotted a specific time in which they 
may meet with a parent/guardian. DCS requires the parents or guardians to allow a minimum of 
24 hour notice to meet with the teachers about any issue so that the teacher may plan accordingly 
and that they might be able to give their full and undivided attention to the matter at hand. 
 
5. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class and to 
observe classroom activities, as follows: 
A. Volunteer to read or talk to a class about their career or a topic of interest. 
B. Chaperone class field trips, field days, or special events. 
C. Come observe a classroom or activity. (Please allow a 24 hour notice) 
D. Come read, research, or visit our library resources especially created for parents. 
E. Volunteer for special duty. (A background check may be required prior to some types of 
duty.) 
F. Come use our computers to look up your student’s grades on HAC. 
G. Eat with your student. 
H. Follow your child throughout a day of his or her school life. (Please allow 24 hours 
for us to set up an appointment for you.) 
 
Parent Responsibilities 
 
We, as parents, will support our children’s learning in the following ways: 
 
. Monitoring attendance. 
. Ensuring that homework is completed. 
. Monitoring outside activities so that the students are rested and ready for school each morning. 
. Volunteering in child’s classroom. 
. Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my child’s education. 
. Promoting positive use of my child’s extracurricular time. 
. Staying informed about my child’s education and communicating with the school by promptly 
reading all notices from the school or the school district either received by my child or by mail 
and responding, as appropriate. 
. Serving, to the extent possible, on policy advisory groups, such as being the Title I, Part A parent 
representative on the school’s School Improvement Team, the Title I Policy Advisory Committee, 
the District-wide Policy Advisory Council, the State’s Committee of Practitioners, the School 
Support Team or other school advisory or policy groups. 

 
 
Student Responsibilities 
We, as students, will share the responsibility to improve our academic achievement and achieve the 
state’s high standards. Specifically, we will: 
 
. Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need it. 
. Get plenty of rest and come prepared to learn every day. 
. Read every day outside of school time. 
. 
 
 
 
. Give my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices and information 
received by me from my school every day. 
. I will follow all the classroom and school rules. 
. I will respect myself, my fellow students, and all adults who work at Drew Central. 
 
 __________ 
School Date 
 
 
 __________ 
Parent Date 
 
 
 __________ 
Student Date 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 Drew Central School District Parental Involvement Plan 
 
 
July 20, 2016 
 
Drew Central School District 
250 University Drive 
Monticello, AR 71655 
 
Superintendent: Billy Williams 
 
School Improvement Status: Needs Improvement 
 
Parent Involvement Committee Members: 
 
Name 
Postition 
Kimbraly Barnes 
Director of Instruction 
Barbie Eubanks 
DCHS Parent Facilitator 
Sheila Gardner 
DCMS Parent Facilitator 
Brandie Everett 
DCES Parent Facilitator 
Anna Jones 
DC Parent Coordinator 
Tiffany Berryman 
Parent 
Dr. Donna Hunnicutt 
Parent 
Kim Williams 
Parent 
Kim Lattimore 
Parent 
Alicia Ratliff 
Parent 
Brandy Hampton 
Parent 

 
Goal 1: How will the LEA foster effective parental involvement strategies and support partnerships among 
school, parents, and the community to improve student achievement? 
 
Action 
Person Responsible 
Develop and disseminate district parental involvement policy. 
Kim Barnes 
The Title I Annual District Meeting will be October 8, 2015 
Kim Barnes 
Conduct an annual meeting in the spring to update policy for next year’s Title I, 
Part A program. The Title I Spring Meeting will be held on March 10, 2016 
Kim Barnes 
Coordinate parental involvement activities with other programs. Drew Central 
has a Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) which 
currently services 50 students, 3 ABC Pre-School Classrooms, and 1 CCDBG 
Pre-School Classroom that has a total of 80 students with a waiting list. 
Anna Jones 
Establish parental involvement contact person at each of the Title I, Part A 
schools. Our Drew Central High School Parental Involvement contact people are 
Barbie Eubanks and Elaine Tipton. The Drew Central Middle School contact 
people are Sheila Gardner and Anna Jones. The Drew Central Elementary 
contact people are Brandie Collier and Liz McRae. The Drew Central District 
contact person is Kimbraly Barnes. An annual review of the effectiveness of the 
parental involvement policy will be held on February 16, 2016 at each school 
and at the district level. 
Brandie Collier 
Sheila Gardner 
Barbie Eubanks 
Kim Barnes 


Develop district parental involvement committee to create a parental 
involvement policy and implement parental involvement activities as well as 
disseminate information to the community to promote parental involvement in 
the Title I, Part A schools. The district parental involvement committee will be 
composed of the facilitators from each of the campuses and an outside parent 
representative to make a 50/50 board. The names of the committee are listed 
above in this document. The district will disseminate information on October 8, 
2015, to parents and the community regarding the parental involvement policy of 
the 2015-2016 school year. 
Kim Barnes 
Involve parents in the process of school review and improvement under Section 
1116 of NCLB. Parents were allowed the opportunity to review the school and 
district plans. The elementary and middle school parents will have a Parents 
Right to know meeting and review of the plan on October 1, 2015. The high 
school parents had a parents’ right to know meeting October 8, 2015. 
Sheila Gardner 
Barbie Eubanks 
Kim Barnes 
Anna Jones 
4. District and school websites and social media keep the parents and community 
5. informed of events at the school. Our school APP is also used to keep parents 
6. up-to-date of happenings as well as the text APP, Remind 101. Our district sets 
7. on one campus – three buildings and one parking lot. A large portion of our 
8. students and parents have to travel thirty minutes to one hour one way to our 
9. campus. We will notify our parents repeatedly through the school year at 
10. various events of the Parents Right To Know Meetings. Parents will remain in 
11. town or drive to town after work for other events such as grade level Parent 
12. Nights, band and choir recitals, book fairs, breakfast before school hours, 
13. Scholarship meetings, and PTO nights. Therefore, we are going to promote 
14. Parental Involvement when we can and when we have parents. We know our 
15. community, families, and we try to reach them as many ways possible. 
Sheila Gardner 
Barbie Eubanks 
Kim Barnes 
Anna Jones 

 
Goal 2: How will the district provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist 
participating schools in planning and implementing effective parental involvement? 
 
Action 
Person Responsible 
Conduct ongoing site visits to observe parental involvement practices. We are 
very fortunate to be on one campus so the district personnel can be seen at parent 
meetings and parental involvement activities. We have the opportunity to attend 
the book fair nights, bingo nights, parent math/.literacy nights, CAP meetings, 
Cookies with Santa, tailgating parties, booster club meetings, HIPPY meetings, 
and other times when parents are involved on campus. 
Kim Barnes 
Billy Williams 
All certified staff members and administrators receive the required Professional 
Development hours for Parental Involvement. Our HQT Para Pros in the DCE 
receive the PI training as well. Documents are printed in both Spanish and 
English to accommodate parents when necessary. Our Home Language Surveys 
currently show that 99% of our families speak English at least part of the time in 
their homes. 
Kim Barnes 
Meredith Shirey 
Trudy Jackson 
Melissia Vincent 
Patti Smith 
Monitoring of each Title I, Part A schools is ensured by the district Parent 
Involvement Coordinator/Federal Programs Coordinator working with the school 
Parent Involvement Facilitators to make sure the following tasks are completed. 
Develop parental involvement policy - all schools are conducting fall meetings 
with parents to review the Parent Involvement Plans and Parent Right to Know 
information. Sign-in sheets, agendas, and notes of the meeting are the proof to 
the district office of the meetings taking place. 
Kim Barnes 
Offer flexible meeting times - the elementary and middle school parents were 
also given the time for the high school meeting. While this may appear to be too 
wide of a grade span, due to the low turn-out of parents and our schools all being 
located on one campus, it is a workable option to answer specific questions and 
explain topics addressing the issues at each grade level span. 
Kim Barnes 
Parents are provided information about the program at the fall meetings and 
given an opportunity to participate in decisions about the parental involvement at 
ACSIP Committee meetings and at handbook committee meetings held in the 
spring. Sign-in sheets, agendas, and notes from meetings serve as evidence. 
Kim Barnes 
Trudy Jackson 
Patti Smith 
Melissia Vincent 


Develop and use the School-Parent Compact is annually reviewed when parents 
meet with school personnel during handbook reviews and updates. Sign-in sheets 
are kept of these meetings. 
Kim Barnes 
Trudy Jackson 
Patti Smith 
Melissia Vincent 
Parents are provided information by letter and at parent/.teacher conferences on 
how they use the HAC/TAC system to check their children's grades. He or she 
may also call the school at any time and visit with someone about password 
problems and other issues with the system. Parents are given a variety of 
opportunities to math and literacy night, 
Common Core Nights, grade level meeting nights, CAP Conferences, Open 
House, PTO events with speakers, to learn how to work with their children on a 
variety of content areas and learning strategies as well. Sign-in sheets are 
provided and kept for these events. 
Kim Barnes 
Trudy Jackson 
Pattie Smith 
Melissia Vincent 

 
Goal 3: How will the district build the school's capacity for strong parental involvement? 
 
Action 
Person Responsible 
Provide information to participating parents in such areas as national, state, and 
local education goals, including parents' rights as defined in Title I, Part A. 
Parents are given the information regarding the rights at the fall meetings, 
September 8, October 1, and October 8, 2015 . Parents are given information 
about education goals through math and literacy nights, Common Core Parent 
and Community presentations, grade level meetings, Parent-Teacher conferences 
held twice a year, CAP conferences, and information given at PTO meetings. 
Sign in sheets and agendas serve as documentation. 
Barbie Eubanks 
Sheila Gardner 
Kim Barnes 
A very active PTO is established at our elementary and middle schools. The high 
school promoted the establishment of a PTO two years ago with a media blitz 
using our web site, community online newspaper, Facebook, twitter, school 
marquee, reminders home, and posters on the campus. The committee had door 
prizes, food, information for parents but only one additional parent came to the 
meeting. The high school has successfully operated an athletic booster club that 
has expanded to being a booster club for other organizations. The choir and band 
have started separate booster clubs so the parents participate in a different way 
but are still actively participating in their children's lives here at school. 
Sheila Gardner 
Barbie Eubanks 
Kim Barnes 
Parents are sent an annual survey to improve school effectiveness in the 
beginning of the year in the parent packet. Because they are overwhelmed with 
paperwork, we are concerned the surveys are not being returned. This year we 
are placing surveys at the offices for parents to complete when they pick up 
students if they have not already completed one. We are also planning to use 
electronic surveys in the future. The high school surveyed parents at the annual 
Red/White basketball game. Samples of surveys are evidence. 
Barbie Eubanks 
The district provides reasonable support for parental involvement for all of our 
participating Title I, Part A schools by providing a para pro that oversees the 
Parent Center during school hours, coordinates Parental Involvement events, 
provides opportunities for our Parent Involvement facilitators to attend trainings, 
and the materials necessary to educate parents about current topics in education. 
The Parent Center Para Pro Time Sheet, sign-in sheets, conference agendas, mail 
outs to parents are all evidence. 
Sheila Gardner 
Kim Barnes 

 
Goal 4: How will the district conduct, with the involvement of parents, ongoing evaluation of the content and 
effectiveness of the parental involvement policy as it relates to strategies for increasing parental participation 
and identifying barriers to greater participation? 
 
Action 
Person Responsible 
Parent surveys regarding parental involvement will go out annually from the 
schools to ask them to provide feedback regarding barriers to parents being 
involved in the schools. The surveys will be given out at the February 11, 2016 
Parent Teacher Conference Day (Spring conference day) The information will be 
reviewed and compiled by the Parental Involvement Committees at each school. 
The results will be shared at the district Parental Involvement Committee 
Sheila Gardner 


meeting. Sign-in sheets of meetings and copies of the surveys and compiled 
results will be evidence. Provide an opportunity for the parents to assist in the 
development of the evaluation procedures, including analysis of data collected. 
Parents are members of the school and district Parental Involvement Committees 
and will evaluate and analyze the data collected when the committees meet in the 
spring to plan for next year. Sign-In sheets are evidence of parent participation. 
From the evaluation process the district committee will: 
-Make recommendations to each participating school for parental involvement 
policy revision. 
-Provide suggestions for designing school improvement policies, as they relate to 
parental involvement. 
-Evidence of this will be sign-in sheets and notes from the district Parental 
Involvement meeting in spring, 2016. (by April 19, 2016) 
 
Kim Barnes 
Each school has a Parental Involvement Plan that reports the annual parent 
activity which is shared with parents, staff and the community at the Parental 
Involvement Plan reviews and upon request. The Parental Involvement Plans are 
available on each of the schools' websites and included in the school ACSIP 
plans which are also on the website. Parents may view the Parental Involvement 
plans on the websites of each school and district. 
Cindy Luper, DCMS 
Sara Watson, DCMS 
Barbie Eubanks, DCHS 
Meredith Shirey, DC 

 
Goal 5: How will the district involve parents in the joint development of the district Title I Application under 
section 1112 (ACSIP)? 
 
Action 
Person Responsible 
The district committee has parents that are not teachers to serve on the 
committee. The parents may also serve on the school committees but that allows 
for some continuity across the district with planning. Committee lists serve as 
evidence. Kim Barnes is responsible for recruiting parents to serve on the District 
Parental Involvement Committee. 
 
Kim Barnes 

 
July 20, 2016